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Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 11/2/2005 8:08 PM (GMT -7)   
Welcome to the diabetes forum if you haven't received a formal welcome before this. We are glad you found HealingWell and hope we can help you with the way you handle your disease. We also would like to learn from you about what you do to keep your sugars in control, shortcuts for following your food program and other health issues that affect us all. We have found that if we pool our knowlege we can all benefit from our shared experience. Some of us are very enthusiastic about our treatment plan of action and sometimes we defend our opinions a bit fiercely nono but we are all here to help each other.

Read back in the posts and find out what you can from others in how they handle their diet and medication needs. Some of our members use alternative health food or herbal therapies with some great results. Some of us are strictly 'medicine from the doctor' people. I am somewhere in the middle. I use medication along with some different food styles and nutritional supplements to help keep my sugars in line. REMEMBER!!! Regardless of how you cope with the disease the bottom line is blood sugar control! Don't get sidetracked by 'cures' and super diets and other stuff. Every day, every day, you want to keep the sugars under 150 maximum any time more than 2 hours after a meal.(If you're an American... Canadians and others use a different counting system that I'm not totally familiar with.) If your doctor has given you a different set of numbers to work with, fine.. just keep on getting those sugars in line.

Diabetic education is a must. If your insurance covers a meeting or class with a dietician GO FOR IT! They know their stuff and will help a lot. If you have food, exercise or medication questions you can ask on this forum and we can usually help out. No question is too dumb. confused Ask anything you like and if it's something that you don't want to discuss on an open forum you may email any of us. Clicking on any of the mods names will take you to our personal page with our email address. Just remember, none of us can substitute for your doctor. That is the person you are entrusting your health care to, so consult with the person with the diploma on the wall in all things important. We can only help educate and offer moral support.

Don't be surprized if you go through a period of mourning before you finally get a handle on this disease. I have found that most of us go through the grief process before we finally get to the point of accepting and living with our diabetes. There is a website about coping with a new health concern that I found especially helpful. I understood a lot about my diabetes, had been educated in nursing school, took nutrition classes and 'learned' a lot of stuff about the disease. It wasn't until I started on insulin and had to get a medic alert bracelet for my own safety sad that the whole thing came home to roost in my brain. I wear the bracelet 24/7 and it's a constant reminder to keep myself in line.

One of the mods, Warren, has found some excellent web info on new diabetes studies and results out of Harvard. Check out his post here and see if you don't learn something very useful about how we aquire diabetes and some new treatments that may be in the future.

Diabetes is a bit scarey at first so read all you can here and get some books at the library as well. Come back and share often so we can learn from each other. Sometimes diabetes is a pain in the patootie but by making some new friends who understand your feelings and thoughts maybe it won't be as tough as all that. Take care!
~ Jeannie

"As one goes through life one learns if you don't paddle your own canoe you don't move."
-Katherine Hepburn


"Madness takes its toll.
Please have exact change."

Post Edited (Jeannie143) : 1/10/2006 11:02:49 AM (GMT-7)


different_seasons
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2005
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 11/19/2005 11:25 AM (GMT -7)   
So, is this a good place to introduce myself? Consider it done. 32 yr old male in Maine. Type 1 for 5 years, all good! Just been looking around for some diabetes forums and this looks like a good place. Hello!

Annielaurie
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2005
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 11/26/2005 2:26 PM (GMT -7)   
Hello - also a newcomer in all respects! Diagnosed 3 weeks ago as having type 2. Have been looking at so many sites that I'm suffering from information overload!!! It's nice to get information from 'old hands'. Am a Londoner aged 52.

kmc76
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2005
Total Posts : 8
   Posted 11/27/2005 12:46 AM (GMT -7)   
Hello. I've been a diabetic Type1 for 26 years now and for the past 19 years it hasnt been in control. I thought I would try to find some support online because where I live there are no support groups for diabetics. I have a family who cares but they just don't understand the frustrations and emptiness one with this disease feels. I have no one else to talk to that can help me get in control.

tammysh
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2005
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 11/27/2005 3:18 PM (GMT -7)   
Hey, I'm Tammy 37 years old type 2 insulin dependent. Just started Byetta 4 weeks ago. My sugar is now going to low and i am sick. But I have read alot that says it will pass. So I am happy about that. I have also been on the wieght watchers diet and am losing fast. The doctor seems to think that if I lose the weight I can come off everything. It is really hard to lose and even harder when you are a good cook and you like to eat, but the Byetta has taken my desire for food away.

sharer
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 76
   Posted 1/5/2006 12:14 AM (GMT -7)   
DearAnnielaurie,
welcome to the forum.Iam much interested to know what took you to the doc and what he has planned for you! we are all here to learn and share a bit of our experience with you! feel free to share.
sharer
Mind is a myth,thought is your enemy,no way out!


2day
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 25
   Posted 1/17/2006 2:08 PM (GMT -7)   

how do you really know short of the doc that exercise and diet is no longer working to control the diabetes.

all my food  is making me sick again. if i manage to keep it down then for at least 2hrs i'm nauseous, dizzy, crazier headache, the  shakes and  sometime the sweats,disoriented. i have fm, ibs and a host of other things so at first this didn't phase me. but these are not my normal fm symptoms.its getting so i don't want to eat just to avoid the above but skipping the meal has it own effects as well.

because the diabetes doesn't has not been squeeking like the other stuff i have not paid much attention to it. I was told i needed to test after eating and exercise and watch diet intake. 


Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 1/17/2006 9:49 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi imhere2day

The easiest, quickest, most direct way to tell how your diabetes is doing is to buy a blood glucose meter at the drugstore or online and start checking your blood sugar.  Read through the forum and you'll find lots of tips from what meters are good to how to take your readings.  Oh and yes theres even a few threads on what numbers are a good range and what numbers are not; so get that meter and read down a little farther into the forum!!

scool  Warren

PS - when you stick your finger to get that drop of blood to test, stick it on the SIDE not on the finger tip (thats where all the nerves are and it hurts more).


It's not that some people have willpower and some don't. It's that some people are ready to change and others are not. - James Gordon, M.D.
What some call health, if purchased by perpetual anxiety about diet, isn't much better than tedious disease. - George Dennison Prentice


2day
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 25
   Posted 1/18/2006 11:53 AM (GMT -7)   

hi Warren,

thanks for your response. I went back into the threads to find out some meter information and about the numbers you spoke of. The numbers are very confusing I'll have to do alot of research to understand.

can't believe i let this go for so long I told my husband i thought the new symptoms were  diabetes related and then we realized i hadn't even said i had it. could have sworn i did but i stay in a fog most of the time besides thought he was there when the doc told us. glad i didn't say anything about the blackouts, that's what really got my attention. I was losing time. after more thought I realized my diet and exercise has changed greatly in the past couple of months. I'm glad God still watches over fools!

thanks again


Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 1/18/2006 3:21 PM (GMT -7)   

A quick guide on Blood sugar numbers.  A normal person is going to stay between 70 and 120 regardless of whether they eat or fast.  But those of us with diabetes are looking to have our fasting blood sugars in the morning at 120 or less and 2 hours after a meal (like dinner) at 160 or lower. 

160 isn't ideal but its at least managble for a 2 hour number for a diabetic.  If you can shoot for or do better than that, thats a good thing.

scool Warren
It's not that some people have willpower and some don't. It's that some people are ready to change and others are not. - James Gordon, M.D.
What some call health, if purchased by perpetual anxiety about diet, isn't much better than tedious disease. - George Dennison Prentice


dolphin_lover
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2005
Total Posts : 51
   Posted 1/20/2006 7:33 AM (GMT -7)   
Welcome all new people on healingwell ...i wasn't on for awhile my computer was broken and now it is fix i am so happy ....i miss this place u get alot of input and helps alot ....i am type 2 and i am doing better since i change doctor but by no mean i goof up too but i start again the next day ....so we can help each other with different stuff so good luck to everyone and hope to hear fro u all ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,dolphin_lover(Fran)
................Take Care All....GOD BLESS and KEEP you WELL...................Franny


N17
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 87
   Posted 1/21/2006 2:48 AM (GMT -7)   
And for those of you who have mmol/L readings for your blood sugar, here is a quick rundown:
4 to 8 is normal.
Less than 3.5 and you are heading for hypoglycemia.
3.5 - 6 before meals and up to 8 two hours after meals is ideal.
6 - 7 before meals and up to 10  two hours after is satisfactory.
Over 7 before and over 10 after meals is undesirable.
Don't be horrified if your glucose tolerance test comes back with a massive number.  Mine was about 21 but I have heard people scoring over 40.  Ouch!  The main thing is to get the sugars down by any means necessary.  I am still in the early stages (diagnosed only 4 months ago, type 2), but realising what this bloody (!) disease can do to you scared me into action. It's going to be a long slog for all of us, but good management, good support and a very good forum such as this can help immeasurably.  A special hello to any UK and Australian newbies.  You might recognise the numbers above!
And on a personal note, I'd like to say that I am a bit of an optimist.  I think that within a couple of decades, many of us will be downing Coke, doughnuts, death-by-chocolate desserts and having three sugars in our coffee (in moderation!) because the boffins will have cracked it.
 
Cheers
 
Brian
"I love Italian.......and so do you"
"Yes"


Gracie06
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2006
Total Posts : 20
   Posted 2/16/2006 2:29 PM (GMT -7)   
Ha!
 
I'm not sure how I missed this post I was pretty sure i read everyone that related to me up to now. ANYWAYS!
 
I'm 26 and I was diagnosed with type 1 at 11. So 15 years.  Of that I think I actually tried to control it for maybe 1. We'll say about 5 years of vague control and that leaves 11 years in which the only thing I "managed" was not killing myself.  (with sugar, I am on the right board) (had a couple of really morbidly humourous ideas for what my epitaph could have said)
 
So this has been my year to face up to some stuff and get my act together.  I have an appointment with a dr. which is something I haven't done in a year and it was (Jesus, just counted it in my head) 7 years before I went to that appointment.  They ran all the tests on me at that time and at that point there didn't seem to be any complications anywhere.  (I had some neurpoathy in my eyes but not anywhere near my vision).  
 
I was really grateful for the tone this board seems to have, I really appreciated that it's other diabetics offering advice.  My biggest reason for avoiding dr.'s is I felt I was wasting their time, I figured they couldn't really help me if I wasn't going to do what they told me. And I just was never really able to do that. 
 
I recently joined a support group for over eaters and it's been wonderful so I started looking for a diabetic one and I found this instead, which is good cause it's twenty four hours a day. I think until recently I had basically written myself off. I figured I would end up blind and I couldn't have kids. SO somehow eating all the sugar I wanted, getting skinnnier and complimented, and dying young was going to be the alternative.
 
And then I met someone.  And he's wonderful, and we're getting married.  He knows everything I've done and all the health risks I may have set myself up for and bless him he loves me anyway.  but he got me thinking and I did some research (if research is googling every diabetic topic under the sun) and it actually made me hopeful and that maybe I could have kids.  And the eye stuff if it's caught early can be stalled, Again more hope.  (for all the years I skipped dr.'s appt's I never missed an eye one..)
 
So now I'm dealing with everything and testing my blood sugar. Last week I had my first day ever (in 15 years) of blood sugars all under 5 (not quite intentional and a bit lower then it should have been) but the fact is, my body is brilliant, if I treat it well everything still works the way it should and everything is very predictable. My battle and it's what it's always been, is all in my head.
 
So that's my background.  I'd love to hear from others who strayed as much as I have from the  "low" road. :)
 
I've never really known any other diabetics so this has been like coming home.  Never knew how much I needed this.
 
Gracie
 

LOLA'S MOM
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 3/8/2006 7:49 PM (GMT -7)   

My MD told me today that she seels I have Type II diabetes probably related to chronic prednisone use for my asthma.  My HbAc1 was 138, I started checking, my sugars today and it was 160 which surprised me. My MD gaave me a presription of Metformin 500mg 1xday.  I am skeptical schocked at this diagnosis. I  have been chronically ill for the lasts 6 months fatique respriatory infections slow healing of tooth extracion. My plan rith now is to monitor my glucose multiple times a day to try and convince myself that it is real.  I don't know I guess I think I have to have blood sugars in the 200's to be diabetic.

I read people don't feel good with diabetes and of course that makes sense but what does it realy feel like to be hyperglycemisc, I really don't know of anyone with the disease to talk with them about it.

Is what I'm going through common, of course I LOVE Sugar!

Thanks


Claire-Bear
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 242
   Posted 3/9/2006 3:32 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi Gracie,

I've only just read your message here - we sound so very similar it's scary!  I'm not new here anymore but thought I'd add here...

I am 26, was diagnosed when I was 11.  I was very strict at first, mostly because of my parents, but then during my teens I let go of my control and carried that on into my 20's.  I was very scared at what I was doing to myself and so I just chose to ignore it.  I didn't go to the hospital for check ups for a good few years (probably at least 5).  An eating disorder didn't help matters much!!

I've been making more and more efforts lately to look after myself and after the last trip to the hospital a week ago it just clicked in my head - all the battling I've done to try to get this under control is with myself and NOT the disease.  I'm closer to getting control of myself than ever before but I'm struggling a little with the eating disorder which has come back to bite me recently.  I think that with diabetes we focus so much on food that it's pretty easy to let food become too important.  Sure, we need to watch what we eat and to know what it does to us but it's become a bit of a fixation for me!

I'm lucky that I, too, don't seem to have any complications (even though for the past 10 or so years I've not looked after myself so I'm a bit worried something will creep up on me eventually) but so far so good.

Like you, too, I've recently gotten engaged!

It's great how much support you can get from this forum, but for me what's even better is offering others support and advice. 

One more thing - I've heard a lot of diabetics develop eating disorders - can anyone tell me whether there's any truth in this?

Claire x


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 3/31/2006 11:09 AM (GMT -7)   
bump for the newbies
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: they sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


zach's granny
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 16
   Posted 4/2/2006 4:20 AM (GMT -7)   

Hello , I am new here .I came looking for answers on how to deal with the fact that my 14 year old grandson has just been diagnosed with type 1. He also was diagnosed with aplastic anemia when he was 4. The doctors saved his life then. And now he has this. The news was devastating.I guess I am just looking for some one who can help me find a miricle cure. But I guess I know there is not one. I read about something called  "Diabeticione .Does anyone know if this works? You see I believe that god put something on this earth to cure anything. We just have to find the right thing. I would also rather take natural meds than the chemical ones if possible. I guess I am just grasping at straws but I am so terrified of what this is going to do to my Zach I am having a hard time coping. You see he is my heart. Can anyone help me? sad


Sunday
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 59
   Posted 4/2/2006 9:21 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi Zach's Granny,

A few random thoughts.  Firstly, your grandson is very lucky to have you in his life.  That said, because you two are so close, you have a very big responsibility ahead of you -- and how you handle it can make a life-long difference in Zach's life.

I'm 48 and have been Type 1 since childhood.  My grandfather was my best friend my whole life.  More than anyone else's reaction to my diagnosis, I remember his.  I overhead him saying to my mother:  "She is a brave little trooper and she's not going to let this get her down.  She's figuring it out and I'm more proud of her than anyone I've ever known in my whole life."

I knew from then on that "figuring it out" was exactly what I would do!  I played softball in high school, worked over twenty years as an executive in the software industry and gave birth to a healthy daughter.

Would I wish this on my worst enemy?  No.  It's a life-long, day-to-day challenge of enormous proportion.

But part of how Zach will process this in the first few years of his experience with it will depend on you and his immediate family members.  He needs support, understanding, and encouragement -- always.  He doesn't need to feel pitied.  His future can be as bright as anyone's.

One of the many things you can do for him is to make certain that you fully understand his disease.  Make absolutely sure that you and his extended family members understand that Juvenile-Onset (J-O) Type 1 is an entirely different disease than Type 2.   Nothing can be more frustrating for an adolescent Type 1 than to hear a bunch of misinformation from well-meaning people about how Aunt Myrtle cured herself from diabetes by loosing forty pounds and giving up Dunkin Donuts.  There are millions of Type 2's and very few J-O type 1s.   

90% of the headlines you will read, the media reports you will hear, and the book titles you will see, with the word diabetes in them will have nothing to do with Zach's disease.

Nothing Zach did or didn't do -- nor ate or didn't eat -- had anything to do with his being a Type 1 diabetic. There is no "natural" nor "chemical" products that will cure his disease.  There is no cure yet.  Cures have been on the horizon my whole life and even islet-cell transplants are a long way off.  Will there by a cure in Zach's lifetime?  I hope so.  But for now,  it's all about his ability to inject the right amount of insulin at the right time in order to metabolize the food he consumes in accordance with what's happening to his body's needs (factoring exercise, stress, etc.)

This is probably longer than it should be.  The main thing I wanted to share with you is that a grandparent who is close to Zach can make a magical difference in his life.  I know my Grandfather was (and is through his memory) the magic in mine!   

 

  

 

 


zach's granny
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 16
   Posted 4/2/2006 12:04 PM (GMT -7)   
Thank you Sunday for your input. I definately will be there for Zach. Like I said he is my heart. All the horror stories about kidney failure, amputations, blindness and so forth has us terrified for him. We are aonly a week into this and I am just not accepting of it yet. I am for him what he needs me to be ,but whn he is not here I am so heartbroken I can hardly stand it. If there is anyone who has tried any of the natural things to help keep down his insulin I would gladly try it.

Sunday
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 59
   Posted 4/2/2006 2:13 PM (GMT -7)   
Zach's endocrinologist will want to know about any and all supplements (assuming that's what you mean by "natural things") Zach consumes. It's important to keep in mind that a Type 1's pancreas, unlike a type 2's, does not produce any natural insulin. It's not a matter of increasing his own insulin production (beyond the typical remission period) through some natural products or remedies. Also, "keeping down his insulin" is not what's important. That would be not be a good notion for him to get in his head. The idea is to manage his blood sugars while avoiding insulin shock. Teenagers who try to do what you're suggesting ("keeping down his insulin") end up with complications earlier in life. I had friends who did that. I'm 48 and my eyes, kidneys, and heart are functioning normally!!!! Avoid the whole concept of using something to keep his insulin down!!!! Insulin is a diabetics best friend! Testing regularly is his/her lifeline! Getting his blood sugars down and stabilized while avoiding insulin reactions is the primary goal for any new Type 1. It's not taking enough insulin often enough that leads to kidney disease, retinopathy, neuropathy, and heart disease. The more near-term risk on a daily basis is insulin shock. Those are the two things you need to know and learn more about right now.
Looking for natural remedies is not in his best interest. A good friend of mine is a Naturopath and he would be much more assertive than I have just been in saying the exact same thing.

zach's granny
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 16
   Posted 4/2/2006 5:16 PM (GMT -7)   
Hello again Sunday, I really just meant that if possible I would like for him not to be so insulin dependant I certainly will not do anything to harm him. And I will certainly do everything I need to do to keep his sugar down. We are only a week into this and we are just learning about dibetes. And by the way Zach is definately encouraged to eat what he is supposed to and to check his blood and take his shots. He has no Idea that I am even thinking of trying to find alternative meds. Don't worry I would always ask his Dr. first anyway.
Thanks again

Claire-Bear
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 242
   Posted 4/3/2006 3:30 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi Zachs Granny,

It's really nice to see someone who cares so much.  I'd just like to say, though, that Zach is going to be dependent on insulin for life.  There isn't anything that he can take that will mean he won't be taking insulin unless there's a cure.  Everyone is insulin dependent as everybody needs it but diabetics have to inject it that's all.  It's not a scary drug, it's a hormone which our body needs so please don't be worried about him having to inject forvever.  I was diagnosed as t1 diabetic when I was 12 and let me tell you that the injection really is nothing to me now.  People will say that's it's just second nature after a while and it is so very true.  I even get to the point where in the back of my head for a split second I almost ask if my friends have taken their insulin even though they are not diabetic!  It's just the norm now. 

This is going to be a lifelong learning process for Zach - I've been diabetic since 1991 and am still learning something new all the time.  It's the scariest thing realising your own mortality and having to deal with that, but please don't listen to all the scare stories.  There are people who've had t1 for decades and are still healthy!

Maybe get Zach to look at sites like this as he can ask all the questions he wants?

Claire x


Sunday
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 59
   Posted 4/3/2006 9:27 AM (GMT -7)   
Until there is a site exclusively for --and about--Type 1 diabetes I wouldn't recommend that a newly diagnosed adolscent spend much time on diabetes message boards for a number of reasons. Firstly, most of what they read will not be about their disease. It will be about Type 2.

The pediatric endocrinologist I saw until very recently (there is a shortage of endocrinologists in our area so he sees adult Type 1s as well) recommends to his newly diagnosed young patients that they join a support group (local hospitals or endo clinics often have them) rather than use message boards and websites that cover diabetes as an all-encompassing single disease, which it isn't. The reason for this is that it's very easy for young Type 1s to gather the wrong information, i.e., info relating only to Type 2 which can be problemmatic.

Ten years ago there was a movement (within the JDF, I believe) to convince the medical establishment to re-name Type 1 so as to make it easier to separate information. I'm not sure what happened to that initiative, (I think it got mixed up with the changes to "types" from juvenile vs. adult) but I'm sorry it didn't take off. It would have made life easier for all of us.

Sunday
48 years old
T1 for 40 years

zach's granny
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 16
   Posted 4/3/2006 4:00 PM (GMT -7)   
I think right now I agree with Sunday about Zach checking out message boards on his own. Right now he trusts us to tell him what to do because he knows how much we love him and that we won't steer him wrong. As I said before, he had aplastic anemia when he was 4 We thought we would loose him then But thank God we didn't. He is a very brave and determined little boy. I
want to thank everyone for there input and support. And Sunday, even though I can't even begin to know how it has been for you having it for so long But I think you are the kind of person that will handle anything that's thrown your way. I hope Zach can be as strong and positive as you are. If I can ever be of any help to any of you just let me know.

Sunday
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 59
   Posted 4/3/2006 4:29 PM (GMT -7)   

I know it's tough early-on for you to deal with Zach's diagnosis.  It's a tough disease and takes a lot of work to manage, as you are ever-so-diligently finding out through your own research.  I suspect from what you've written, he's going to be the kind of young man who can step up to the challenge, and one whom has a family full of loving support.  (Not to mention a Grandmother who's already the President of his fan club!)

One of my daughter's closest friends is a fifteen year old Type 1 named Rachael.  Rachael has been diabetic since the age of 2.  She wore an insulin pump for a year, but has since opted for traditional shots.  Anyway--Rachael is a beautiful, active, funny, bright, and hugely popular young girl.   For the homecoming dance her mother found a gorgeous dress that would accomodate wearing her pump easily.  For the Turn-about dance a few weeks ago, she didn't have the pump, but she had a cute little purse just big enough for her supplies.  Her friends all carried purses the exact same size.  They all know about her condition.  She doesn't hide anything.  She tells them when she's not feeling great and they know what to do and how support her.  She's amazing.  She misses out on nothing by sharing the information her friends need to know, and by taking good care of herself.  

I bet Zach is going to handle himself the same way.   yeah  

Sunday
48 years old
T1 for 40   

 

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