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Prayerful
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Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 222
   Posted 11/18/2005 4:55 PM (GMT -6)   

The other day I posted a question about aspartame. Someone suggested using Stevia instead. I went to GNC today and the person there gave me a box of 100 packets of "NuNaturals NuStevia (White Stevia Powder). I asked her if this 'NuStevia' was the same as 'Stevia' and she said "Yes."

The Supplement Facts on back of box read: "Other ingredients: Maltodextrin and natural flavors. Suggested use: Add 1 packet directly to food or beverage. NuNaturals uses our special, highly concentrated Stevia EXTRACT, NuStevia, from which the bitterness of the EXTRACT has been removed. Be assured that this is a true Stevia EXTRACT, consistent in the quality that you expect from NuNaturals. Maltodextrin is a carbohydrate derived from corn, added to make measuring easier. NuNaturals uses plant-based natural flavors that help to make our Stevia products the best-tasting ones available. NuStevia is a natural plant EXTRACT. Contains no soy, yeast, gluten, wheat, milk, synthetics, artificial colors or flavors, preservatives, saccharin, aspartame, sucralose, or artificial sweeteners."

#1- What I am questioning is - is ths box that I bought, NuNaturals NuStevia (White Stevia Powder), the same as the Stevia that was recommended to me to use in place of the Equal? Is there a difference between the "Stevia" recommended to me the other day and the box I bought today of "NuStevia?"

On the side of the box it mentions: "NuStevia White Stevia Pure EXTRACT Powder and Quick Dissolve Tabs both without maltodextrin.'

The box I bought of NuStevia (White Stevia Powder) states that it DOES contain Maltodextrin.

#2- Does this make a difference? That the NuStevia White Pure EXTRACT Powder does not contain maltodextrin and that the NuStevia (White Stevia Powder) that I bought, does contain maltodextrin?

Do I have to return the box I bought? Thank you.


diamond911
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 66
   Posted 11/21/2005 5:27 AM (GMT -6)   
Maltodextran is a carb and might have an effect on your blood sugar. Some of those, like splenda, which is maltodextran, are fine for some and raise the blood sugars for others. Some feel that maltodextran is as bad for you as aspartame. I couldn't tell ya.

I use both. Pure stevia is ok for tea, but its difficult to measure properly. Too much and it tastes bitter. I use splenda for baking.

Prayerful
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 222
   Posted 11/21/2005 3:59 PM (GMT -6)   

Thank you for your response. I decided to return the NuStevia for a refund. I was using one packet of Equal with my Quaker Puffed Rice cereal and one packet of Equal with my coffee. I am now using 1/2 teaspoon of Splenda in my All Bran and 1/2 teaspoon of Splenda in my coffee (which I have about 2-3 times a week).

It is so hard trying to find a suitable sugar substitute (they all say approved for Diabetics). I just noticed that the Ricola throat drops I like also contain aspartane.

Someone told me that it is not unusual to get a BG reading of 180 if you test too soon after a meal. Does that sound right?


Warren
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Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 11/21/2005 5:09 PM (GMT -6)   
Absolutely!  Especially if you have any appreciable carbs in your meal they can spike your BS right up there in fairly short order.  If you are skeptical try eating a really ripe banana and then 20 mins later taking your BS reading!!
 
A few of the members have writen in other places in this forum about the "glycemic" index and briefly how it works.  This is something you might be interested in.  It shows a "value" for different foods and represents how fast they will convert and be absorbed as sugar in your blood.
 
In any event, my Docs have consistantly told me that 160 or less 2 hours after eating is a normal thing.  Typically you would like to keep your spikes under 200 and see your postprandials (that 2 hour after thingy) below that 160 mark. (and realize that most of us don't know what our spikes are in that we only measure for that 2hr after reading).
 
scool  Warren

Prayerful
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 222
   Posted 11/21/2005 6:09 PM (GMT -6)   

Warren - Thank you for your reply. I have been looking at a few glycemic index lists on the web. As a matter of fact, that is why I stopped using Quaker Puffed Rice and switched to All Bran. Also, I stopped using one packet of Equal in the Quaker Puffed Rice (now All Bran) and use 1/2 teaspoon of Splenda. Also have given up the one packet of Equal in coffee (which I have about 2-3 times a week) and substituted 1/2 teaspoon of Splenda.

I know now about waiting 2 hours after eating to do a test, but how long should one wait after walking, say, 2 1/2 miles? Should you wait 2 hours also? No food involved, just the walking! Would you or someone else know? Thanks.

Sunday I had fairly large lunch at 12 noon and then went to a movie, got out about 2:15 pm and then went for a 2 mile walk. At about 3:30 pm I did BG test and it was 105. (As I said in previous posts, I consider myself pre-diabetic and want to do things now to possibly prevent onset of II or I.)

Bob

 

 

Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 11/27/2005 7:57 PM (GMT -6)   

For anyone considering using Stevia, there are lottsa different places to buy or order the stuff.  However, the thing to remember is DON't get the chrystaline version that looks like sugar, all the good stuff has been processed out of it and you've picked up the bad stuff in the processing.

That leaves the liquid form.  In this form there is the clear variety and the dark molasass colored variety.  Go for the dark, thats the good stuff.  Its soooooo concentrated that usually only one or two drops in coffee is all you need.

scool Warren

Prayerful
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 222
   Posted 11/28/2005 5:10 PM (GMT -6)   
Warren -
Thanks for the info. I have sent for "Stevia Liquid Concentrate @ 4.84 Dark 1 fl oz from" and intend to use it in my coffee. (Practically everything else I look at has aspartane in it.)
Any suggestions as what to use with All Bran cereal (besides 1/2 teaspoon of Splenda), or should I make a seperate post for this question?
Bob

Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 11/29/2005 9:38 AM (GMT -6)   

As long as you have the liquid stevia use that.  I'm assuming you put milk on your cereal, so simply add the stevia to the milk like you would to your coffee and Voila!

scool Warren

Prayerful
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 222
   Posted 11/29/2005 5:14 PM (GMT -6)   

Thank you very much. I will try it with my All Bran (yes, I use 'Lactose Free - Fat Free' milk. I read the post by the person who tried the Stevia and said it taste "horrible." I guess it might be an acquired taste, but I am very willing to give it a try.

Bob


sandbranch
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2005
Total Posts : 8
   Posted 11/30/2005 11:10 AM (GMT -6)   
i have use stevia for a long time and also some Splenda but i think stevia best because it is an herb. Maybe nothing is completely safe. I find lots of places to get stevia, some of it is a green leaf, which i dont like,it is ok for teas, really sweet, but i use the powder and it takes very little to sweeten. Til i find out better i will use it

Chutsman
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2005
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 12/2/2005 8:23 PM (GMT -6)   
Robert2 said...
Warren -
Thanks for the info. I have sent for "Stevia Liquid Concentrate @ 4.84 Dark 1 fl oz from" and intend to use it in my coffee. (Practically everything else I look at has aspartane in it.)
Any suggestions as what to use with All Bran cereal (besides 1/2 teaspoon of Splenda), or should I make a seperate post for this question?
Bob
Hi Robert, would you mind sharing your source for Stevia Liquid?  Thanks.
The short form for "you are" is "you're", NOT "your".


Prayerful
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 222
   Posted 12/2/2005 8:26 PM (GMT -6)   
I believe you might be asking where I ordered the Stevia. I don't believe this board will allow us to post any links to 'money-making' sites. If I am wrong, the moderators will let me know and I'll supply the link. You might try a google search for stevia liquid dark....

Chutsman
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2005
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 12/2/2005 8:45 PM (GMT -6)   
Right after I posted that, I thought that what you said might be the case. I did try a google search but could not come up with the price you quoted. Would you send me email with the info? My email has been enabled.
The short form for "you are" is "you're", NOT "your".


Chutsman
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2005
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 12/3/2005 8:57 AM (GMT -6)   
Thanks, Robert ... got it.
The short form for "you are" is "you're", NOT "your".


desertdiabetic
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 115
   Posted 12/9/2005 11:38 PM (GMT -6)   
I have to jump in here. Stevia has made it possible for my to maintain good control of my bg. I use the powdered version. I have not heard anything about it being bad for you. I will have to look into that. about the liquid vesion. I think if I had to use it I would find something else - just my own opinion though.

The moderator mentioned mild with cereal. Read the label. Mild contains lots of sugar. I have found one soy mild that contains only 1gram in the portion. I follow Bernstein and do very well with my bg numbers. I know it is believed that bg numbers of 150 to 190 are okay after you eat. Especially if you take them right away. I test one hour after eating to get the peak number. And 120 means I over did it. The theory of small numbers Bernstein talks about works. Don't over drive your system and you don't have to correct so much. I am type 2 and don't 'correct' at all, just live with my mistakes - small numbers keep my numbers down to a mininum....

Read those labels very closely... the food industry will tell you out front that it is sugar free and then add sugar by other names, and in quanitity.

nunaturals
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 12/26/2005 1:03 PM (GMT -6)   
I came across this forum doing an internet search on NuStevia, which is our company’s product. The Stevia in NuStevia White Stevia Powder is Stevia that is extracted in a natural process. During the extraction, the parts of the plant that cause the bitter taste are removed.

Why does NuNaturals need a flowing agent in the White Stevia Powder? NuNaturals Stevia Extract is so extremely concentrated that 1/32 tsp. is equal to 1 serving. We add maltodextrin to help the Stevia flow smoothly into and out of the packet. Maltodextrin also allows the Stevia to be more easily measured. We do have products that contain no fillers or different types of fillers.

There is about .04% sugar in maltodextrin. How much sugar is .04%? The .04% sugar in maltodextrin is equivalent to 32 milligrams (mg).
How many milligrams (mg) of sugar are in 2 teaspoons white table sugar? There are 8,000 mgs of sugar in 2 tsp. of white table sugar (250 times more sugar!).

Is maltodextrin bad for you. My opinion is no. Dr. Allen of the Glycemic Research Institute is one of the leading researchers in this field. In March of 2005, we met with her at the west coast trade show. We ask the question that we did 5 years earlier. Will 1-2 grams of maltodextrin have any noticeable effect on blood sugar levels. Her answer again was no. If you consume 15-20 grams in a serving, this may start to have a noticeable effect on your blood sugar level.

The naturals flavor in our product is an herb extract. There is only .25% used. This is a very, very small amount, but it does help improve the overall taste of the product.

Even though my company sells Stevia, my intent here to try to present facts about some of the ingredients in our product and not to sell anyone. Do your own research as to what is the best alternative for you.

Warren Sablosky,
President, NuNaturals, Inc.

desertdiabetic
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 115
   Posted 12/26/2005 1:41 PM (GMT -6)   
I use Stevia all the time. I am a true follower of Stevia. I do not use your product - most likely because it is not on the shelf where we purchase our Stevia.

I do have to add that if it were on the shelf we would still not purchase it becasue of the maltodextrin. The main reason being that the food industry(your industry also) does not say on the package how much is inside(maybe your product is different). I think I can say without any qualifications that both industries lie so much about what is in their products that we the consumer have to read into everything much beyond the label. Believe me, this is nothing towards your product or you personally. I don't know your particular product or you and would never across the board include any one particular product in my statement. The problem is that we the consumer have nothing to go by except the label and what is said on the packaging. You know that the label of most products is very misleading and you cannot believe "sugar free" unless you read the detailed label in great detail. I have been burned so many times by labels. Our health and lives depend on consuming the right products - this is not a matte of taste or just preferences - it is out eyesight,heart and overall health that we are protecting.

Is Maltodextrin bad for you? I don't know, I do know that in the fight to buy products that work for me Maltodrexrtrin is not one that I find acceptable. It is what it is made from that makes it unacceptable to for me. However, there are times when I do p;urlchase Maltrodextrin in products - that is when I can determine that the levels are truly low as you say that your product contains.

Please don't take what I say personal - it is not meant that way at all. If your(industry) would put the actual amounts on the label we could make a better decision.

Post Edited (desertdiabetic) : 12/26/2005 11:56:58 AM (GMT-7)


nunaturals
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 12/26/2005 3:51 PM (GMT -6)   
We searched and are still researching and looking for an alternative to maltodextrin that would

1. Keep the cost to the consumer affordable
2. Dissolve well
3. Not add empty calories or carbohydrates to the diet (or as few as possible and still have a product that functions well)

So far maltodextrin was the best choice for our Stevia products that need to have a filler. We hope that in the future, a filler will be developed that is natural and has only all the positives and none of the negatives. Til then maltodextrin is the only choice we really have. FOS (inulin) has it's positive and negative characteristics as a filler. We feel that for this particular application and in the small amounts that we use (920 mg), that maltodextrin still is the best choice for most people.

I hope this helps from a manufacturer's point of view and information.

Be Well,
Warren

Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 12/29/2005 1:44 PM (GMT -6)   
A few notes on malodextrin. Maltodextrin is made from corn. Basically it is starch that has been broken down into smaller molecules, so it is pretty easy to digest. Maltodextrin does not contain malt. Maltodextrin is used as an added ingredient in foods to enhance flavors and texture. It is also found in a lot of nutritional supplements. Maltodextrin doesn't contain any gluten and should be safe for gluten free diets.
 
HOWEVER, Maltodextrin's glycemic index should be considered metabolically equivalent to glucose (dextrose).   With this as a postcript, if you are using the GI index for your diet, you should exercise appropriate caution when using maltodextrin.
 
scool  Warren

nunaturals
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 12/31/2005 12:34 PM (GMT -6)   
I absolutely agree. Warren-NuNaturals(I just released there are 2 Warrens here!)

Prayerful
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 222
   Posted 1/3/2006 6:29 PM (GMT -6)   

 

Robert2 said: Someone told me that it is not unusual to get a BG reading of 180 if you test too soon after a meal. Does that sound right?    Posted 11/21/2005 3:59 PM (GMT -5)   
Warren said: Absolutely!  Especially if you have any appreciable carbs in your meal they can spike your BS right up there in fairly short order.  If you are skeptical try eating a really ripe banana and then 20 mins later taking your BS reading!!
A few of the members have writen in other places in this forum about the "glycemic" index and briefly how it works.  This is something you might be interested in.  It shows a "value" for different foods and represents how fast they will convert and be absorbed as sugar in your blood.
In any event, my Docs have consistantly told me that 160 or less 2 hours after eating is a normal thing.  Typically you would like to keep your spikes under 200 and see your postprandials (that 2 hour after thingy) below that 160 mark. (and realize that most of us don't know what our spikes are in that we only measure for that 2hr after reading).   Posted 11/21/2005 5:09 PM (GMT -5)
This afternoon I was talking with the wife of a friend of mine (he has T1 for many, many years) and she happened to mention that: "in a non-diabetic person, 2 hour postprandial BG levels are usually <120 and rarely >140. She said that a non-diabetic could eat a pound of sugar with little or no effect on their BS."
That got me thinking about my original question on 11/21/05 (above) and I looked on the internet and saw this posting ""Normal (non-diabetic) people can go up to 180 depending on the food intake, how well they are and also what they are doing. The main thing is how fast it comes down again. A non-diabetic will usually return to normal within 1/2 to 1 hour - depending on circumstances."
Can a non-diabetic ever have a reading of 180? Would someone please clarify?
 
( I believe my original question should have read "Someone told me that it is not unusual for a non-diabetic to get a BG reading of 180 if they test 90 minutes after a meal, depending on what was eaten. Does that sound right? Posted 11/21/2005 3:59 PM")

Post Edited (Robert2) : 1/3/2006 8:00:52 PM (GMT-7)


sharer
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 76
   Posted 1/3/2006 7:39 PM (GMT -6)   
Dear Warren,
Has the U.S. FDA approved Stevia as a sweetening agent?
Mind is a myth,thought is your enemy,no way out!


Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 1/4/2006 9:24 AM (GMT -6)   

Hi Sharer (Im not sure which Warren you were addressing so I'll answer this)

FDA Consumer Magazine said...
Another product, stevia, is derived from a South American shrub. Though it can impart a sweet taste to foods, it cannot be sold as a sweetener because FDA considers it an unapproved food additive. "The safety of stevia has been questioned by published studies," says Martha Peiperl, a consumer safety officer in FDA's Office of Premarket Approval. "And no one has ever provided FDA with adequate evidence that the substance is safe." Under provisions of 1994 legislation, however, stevia can be sold as a "dietary supplement," though it cannot be promoted as a sweetener.

This is taken directly from the official FDA consumer magazine as of December 2004.  I haven't heard anything about any type of approval in 2005.

scool Warren

sharer
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 76
   Posted 1/4/2006 9:32 AM (GMT -6)   
Dear Warren,
Whenever i say warren it's addressed to you,since you are the forum Moderator.I did not know that another warren is in the forum.sorry for the confusion caused!
Sharer
Mind is a myth,thought is your enemy,no way out!


sharer
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 76
   Posted 1/4/2006 11:18 AM (GMT -6)   
Dear Robert2,
regarding your last post about a non-diabetic reaching 180mgs%,there are two things involved here.One is what type of food the person has eaten and second ,when is the blood glucose measured.
One hour after a meal the spike peaks.It's been found that at 2 hours after the meal the value returns to near-fasting value.Even at one hour the peak rarely crosses 160mgs% when a person is given 75 gms glucose.So,your friend's wife may not be right afterall and the usual advise to people reaching 180mgs%,2 hours after a meal is to go for an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test to rule out "pre-diabetes"
sharer
Mind is a myth,thought is your enemy,no way out!

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