Ever been denied a job?

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different_seasons
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2005
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 11/24/2005 7:30 AM (GMT -7)   
Me? Yes. I had a class 1 CDL and lost that when I was diagnosed. I can understand it though. My current job is a boiler engineer and I was hired right off. After meeting with the company nurse they acted, well, not so happy to see me, as if they regretted it. But what I don't understand is the USPS. They have been giving me a hard time, I've been hired already but it seems to be a big pain. First I filled out a medical questionare just like everyone else. Then the physical with my doctor. Then a statement from my doctor stating that I'm fit for the job. Then a call from a USPS nurse rep. wanting more info. Now I have to forward my last two A1Cs and then a follow-up call pertaining to those results and then another physical. I was hired two months ago, and I'm still waiting. It's kind of discouraging, going through all this crap. I wish ebay had health insurance. :-)   Thanks for listening.

wa5ekh
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2005
Total Posts : 68
   Posted 11/24/2005 8:59 AM (GMT -7)   
It makes you a higher insurance risk and more expensive. It's really that simple. It doesn't see, fair.....but it seems to be standard business(my company fired every other diabetic that I knew of...but they hide!). I have been worried about this for years, but my skill set is very hard to replace at 2x my salary...so I guess I am working cheap..? My strategy is work cheap, increase my value, and keep looking for the next job(where you are more valuable to that operation). Doesn't sound like diabetic advice....but I am type 2 in control(that helps too) not on diabetic meds(that helps!) and since I was diagnosed I lost 60-80# and almost never get sick anymore(that probably helps!).

devine007
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2005
Total Posts : 76
   Posted 11/24/2005 9:45 AM (GMT -7)   
Maybe it's different in Canada, but I have absolutely never had a problem getting a job with diabetes. I did however have to go on medical leave during my pregnancy because they were short staffed and I wasn't able to take proper breaks (especially when I was low), but even then my boss was very understanding and cooperative. Aren't there laws or something that mean companies can't be like that?

Pin Cushion
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 442
   Posted 11/24/2005 1:31 PM (GMT -7)   
It is different with every employer. Most can be understanding, or they have a better then average knowlege of what diabetes is.
Yes it is alomost impossable to keep a class 1 cdl (commercial divers licence) because they require a tight control and require updates from your doctor about your hba1c tests. I have a friend that is a long haul and fights to keep his hba1c in the required range.
But remember you are protected under the Disablities act if you want to fight for it.
And yes some will do anything they can to avoid a person with any cronic disease because of the higher insurance costs. It isn't fair but some get away with it.
I have a great doctor that would write a letter in a heartbeat, that a person with tight control usuallys stays in btter health then the average joe because of it.
Sigmoid Colostomy / Crohns / Type 1 Diabetic / Ostioarthritus / Fibromyalgia / Asthma / High Blood Pressure / High Colesterol / Migraines. Ain't life a joy?



* I think it may be time for a colorful metaphor*


wa5ekh
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2005
Total Posts : 68
   Posted 11/24/2005 8:26 PM (GMT -7)   
THIS BRING US TO A TOPIC OF MY CHOISE!!! scool I believe diabetics have the rare capacity to know what their blood sugar is (if they aren't medicated....I really believe medication is initially used as immediate damage control but complicate control in the long run...for type 2! only!)

But the point is that "diabetics in tight control" have understanding of a few more vital signs (mainly one-Blood Glucose level). Glucose is our bodies gasoline, right? Insulin the carburator? I constantly notice Non-diabetics have generally and widely no clue how important this is.

If industry understood this they might be anxious to hire "tight control diabetics"(??)......sure....ok ....a little too optimistic I guess.....

(since I found the formula for tight control my absentee-ism is zero. Dr. visit s almost zero ...almost no virus/colds/infections for 3 years......wait but this is bad for large corps selling self-insurance and meds.....you know the old company store tricks....)

but what about higher efficiency arguments......too advanced for HR....(sorry HR guys...)

devine007
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2005
Total Posts : 76
   Posted 11/25/2005 10:06 AM (GMT -7)   
I agree with you about the tight control thing. I know my body better than most other people probably because of my diabetes. ( I am type 1) The other thing that really gets me is driver's licenses. They let people who have been in accidents or drunk driving keep driving, but me in perfect health (i have diabetes but am in better health than a lot of non diabetics) and no accidents or tickets still have to get a driver's medical every single year. Those things aren't cheap. It's ridiculous! Anyways thanks for letting me get that out lol. Robyn

different_seasons
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2005
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 11/25/2005 10:11 AM (GMT -7)   
I just talked to the USPS nurse, she said the cutoff A1C was 8.5 so I'm ok. It's still frustrating.

Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 11/27/2005 9:30 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi,

Well, I hate the attitude that hiring anyone with a chronic disease is bad news but c'est la vie.  In the case of diabetics, what pushes the insurance rates so high is that even if you are under tight control, the insurance company has NO idea what silent damage you did to yourself when you weren't under tight control or even before you were diagnosed.  Remember, diabetes is a major source of stroke and heart problems besides reduced ability to heal; and these become REALLY expensive hospitalizations. 

I'm a type two under really good control, but I haven't a clue what I did to myself when I wasn't.  I'm 5'11 - 180 lbs. and normal everything except I need meds to keep my blood sugar in the normal range.  I live a normal life so I really get steamed when someone tells me I can't have a certain job because of this disease.  BUT, being in NYC, I've found that if you work for large corporation, you fall through the cracks with no problem.  I think this is probably because their insurance plans are so big, you don't move the policy one way or another.

 

scool Warren

Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 11/27/2005 5:37 PM (GMT -7)   
My hubby was let go from his job right after he had to fill out a company 'medical survey' asking about family illness and we had to list all of my medications. The thing that really burns my bisquits is that they are so short sighted about medical treatment... So if I just ignored my symptoms and went blind or needed an amputation, that might be a lot more expensive in the long run but at least I'd save the company money on its insurance today! If you treat your disease you are punished for trying to take care of yourself! Makes no sense at all!

Now we are without insurance, without his job and trying to keep it all together. Makes you bonkers!
~ Jeannie

"As one goes through life one learns if you don't paddle your own canoe you don't move."
-Katherine Hepburn


"Madness takes its toll.
Please have exact change."


wa5ekh
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2005
Total Posts : 68
   Posted 11/28/2005 7:53 AM (GMT -7)   
When I was industrial sales, I ran on to many cases of this, mostly these people ended up finding a job and not telling the employer. That might be difficult with a larger employer who has a large HR department and resource$. And even with smaller business their Insurance companies are huge and have enormous information date banks and links, you know!
So I had some experience with these employees trying to start their own companies(too expensive!) and others going to work for small employers who would make financial contributions in lieu of Insurance (to be fair) ....and even then workman's comp insurance was a problem frequently for both groups.
I struggled to figure this out. I assume I could be in this condition any day, out of tight control, or some other less controllable issue.

For now I can only imagine much focused self employment, very profitable and self insurance, and luck. What did we do before insurance? Seems like we buy a lot of Blue Sky(insurance promise of security) out of fear.

Skeeter_Bug
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2005
Total Posts : 86
   Posted 11/29/2005 7:11 AM (GMT -7)   
[quote]
But remember you are protected under the Disablities act if you want to fight for it.[/quote]
 
Diabetes is no longer covered by the Americans Disabilities act. the law says that diabetes is considred controlable. The reason I know this in 1999 my husband was discriminated against by Wal-mart corp because they fired him because he is a diabetic he sued them which took 3 years to get to court and on the very last day of the trial in federal court the ADA changed the law as Diabetes is not a  disability because it can be controled with insulin,/pills. and the fed law looks at diabetes in it's controled state even if the employer caused it to be out of control you still cannot do anything nono all that damm work went down the toilet. While my husband was at Wal-Mart they would work him 9 hours without a lunch break or even a 15 min break and he almost died because of this and he even had doctors note and they still did not follow it

Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 11/29/2005 1:32 PM (GMT -7)   

As a postscript to these posts, there was a piece on the nightly national news about the growing population that was not on insurance.  One of the examples they showed was a husband and wife, both diabetic where he was fired from his job (so they both lost their health insurance) because he was diabetic.  I work for a huge corp so I haven't felt this discrimination, but nevertheless it burns me up mad   

So, I would suggest that each and everyone of you that feels strongly about this send a letter to your State senator and even your congressman.  Make it a PAPER letter, they command much more attention than emails.  If enough people write, at least some aide will be assigned to see if its legislation that should be written. 

Comeon, it takes 20 mins out of your day to find your Senator's address, write a letter and stick a stamp on it.

scool  Warren

(Follow-up.......I just sent letters to my two state senators. Lets see what responses I get. I'll post what they say when the responses come in.)

Post Edited (Warren) : 11/30/2005 10:16:19 AM (GMT-7)

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