Inhaler for diabetes

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fantom889
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 28
   Posted 11/30/2005 7:16 AM (GMT -7)   
Does anyone know about the insulin inhalers being developed for T1 and T2? I did a google search and found a lot of old articles.
fantom889@hotmail.com


Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 11/30/2005 8:24 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi fantom,
 
Almost every major drug manufactuer is going after the inhaled insulin market.  The closest at this time is Pfizer who's "EXUBERA" inhaled insulin product is in Phase III clinical trials.
 
Inhalers are typically for type 1's and they have a problem.  The problem is dose control.  Compared to insulin pumps or even syringes, using an inhaler is like using a sledge hammer for dosing control.  Imagine the variables that smoking, pnemonia, asthma, etc present when trying to effectively use an inhaler.  Ahhh but thats what Phase III trials are all about, getting the kinks out.  I would imagine by the time this product is ready, sometime late next year, these and other problems will have been ironed out. Hope this helps.
 
scool  Warren
 
What it looks like
 

Post Edited (Warren) : 11/30/2005 9:12:01 AM (GMT-7)


fantom889
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 28
   Posted 12/1/2005 12:57 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for the info and the photo. The articles I found were fairly old i.e. dated 1999-2003. You have a valid point about dosage control. I also read that insulin inhaler requires a different application process than the typical asthma inhaler. The photo proves it. That isn't anything I would expect anyone to carry in their pocket or even a purse. Still, it gives hope for a less invasive method of control. I read in one of the articles the dosage was controlled (interpret "fixed") so the subjects had to fit a very specific criteria.
fantom889@hotmail.com


Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 12/1/2005 10:01 AM (GMT -7)   

The inhaler was really developed for the diabetic that just can't cope with needles.  It is NOT a better method of delivery than by needle, but as you say, just a less invasive method.  My method of coping with the needles as Im as big a baby about giving myself shots as anyone, is I use very very small needles (BD 33g 3/16's of an inch).

The new inhaler has been developed to use blister packs of insulin in powder form, equivalent to 9 unit or 3 unit doses.

As I metioned earlier, a major problem with the inhaled  approach at this point is its inability to deliver more precise insulin doses. Three units of Regular insulin would make it difficult for many to achieve excellent control which is the real goal of insulin delivery. Using the 1800 Rule for Regular insulin, someone on 50 units of insulin per day would drop 90 points (5 mmol) in their blood sugar per 3 unit pack, while someone on 30 units a day would drop 180 points (10 mmol) per pack. Precise control flies out the window with this sledge hammer approach, especially compared to insulin pumps capable of delivering tenths of a unit with precision.

In my opinion its a bit of a Rube Goldberg device but if it gets people that are needle shy to start taking insulin, so much the better.  For the majority of us, its simply not the answer.

scool Warren

fantom889
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 28
   Posted 12/2/2005 12:22 AM (GMT -7)   
Nice post. Thanks, seriously. I am very new to all this. It's for my 8 year old son (type 1). Precision is the key to stability so it virtually eliminates inhalers as an option, especially for a young child. I am using a 30 unit (cc) syringe. Is there a smaller one? His doses are still only 1+4 1/2 a.m. and 1+1 p.m. I admit to hoping for needle precision and inhaler convenience....oh well...still Warren that was a great post..thanks.
fantom889@hotmail.com


Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 12/2/2005 8:19 AM (GMT -7)   
Yeah!! Kidlets should definately use tiny needles.  The company BD makes 31g needles. These are really very very tiny. I use them in a 3/16's inch length but you should ask your doctor about that length as sometimes the shorter needle will deliver insulin faster (it will react faster).  In any event BD makes the 31g needles in a variety of lengths and barrel capacites so you can get just what you need.
 
I was so needle shy when I first had to use Lantus insulin. I looked a the needles in the hospital they were giving me the insulin with and said YIKES!!!  These are sooooo tiny about 85% of the time I can't even feel them go in.  I just rest the needle against the pinched skin and with just a whisper of pressure it slides in.  These needles have some sort of a micro fine coating as a lube the makes them slide soooo easy they are virtually pain free.
 
scool  Warren
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