Tim Tam writes about meal ideas:

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

Lanie G
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5920
   Posted 5/1/2017 6:29 PM (GMT -6)   
He posted: "OK, what if I wanted to eat a can of carb-free soup, such as tomato, cream of chicken, celery soup, brocculi cheese soup, pea soup, etc., at the same or the next lunch?

And what do you think of cottage cheese with cut tomato (not fruit which has fruitous, or fruit sugar)?

Also, I've heard that many low fat products have added sugar, to make up for less taste in the low fat items. As a diabetic, why do I want more sugar in a low fat product?

Do you believe you should always get low fat items?
"

Lanie G
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5920
   Posted 5/1/2017 6:38 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi again. Tim Tam, I felt we needed to take this to a brand new thread rather than add onto the new member's post.

Anyway, sure, soup is fine and if it's in a can, make sure you read the nutrition label. Very often there is added sugar or flour to these soups. And watch the sodium levels. Canned soups are notorious for high sodium levels.

I am not a fan of cottage cheese. Read the label on the container and see what the carb content is. That will be your guide as to how much you should eat. If it's acceptable, then add a tomato!

The problem with all packaged food is that sugar, salt, flour and other extra ingredients are added which are not helping anyone's health. You're right about low-fat products have added sugar sometimes to make up for lost flavor. Also, added salt. This is a problem with packaged food.

No, I don't think you should get low fat items. But I also don't think you should be eating a lot of packaged food anyway! turn
Lanie

diabetes moderator
diabetes type 2 controlled by diet and exercise and
metformin
very low carb way of eating

Check out the following site for more info on blood sugar:
www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/

Tim Tam
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2016
Total Posts : 1021
   Posted 5/2/2017 11:55 AM (GMT -6)   
Lanie,

Thanks for the information.

Do you make your own soup? Do you home cook all your own food? Are you on a mission?

Pork and beans, and canned fruit, I can wash out the sugar by opening the can 9/10ths of the way, putting the can under the tap water, letting it fill up and draining it out a couple of times, by holding the top down.

How do you drain the sugar out of cottage cheese and soup cans?

The same way?

Lanie G
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5920
   Posted 5/2/2017 12:53 PM (GMT -6)   
If we eat soup, I do make my own soup, yes. I've nearly always made our meals from scratch. It's not a mission. It's just that my husband and I prefer more natural food without additives and now that I have to watch my blood sugar, it's an added benefit.

I don't eat beans but my husband does and he drains the can of beans in a colander in the sink and runs cold water over them. He likes cold bean salad. Neither of us eat canned fruit.

I doubt you can or even try to rinse sugar out of cottage cheese or canned soup. How on earth could you do that? If you eat cottage cheese, just eat an amount that doesn't have tons of carbs. I don't eat cottage cheese so I don't even know what the carb content is. And as I previously wrote, if you eat canned soup, just read the labels for sodium and carb contents, choosing wisely.
Lanie

diabetes moderator
diabetes type 2 controlled by diet and exercise and
metformin
very low carb way of eating

Check out the following site for more info on blood sugar:
www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/

Tim Tam
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2016
Total Posts : 1021
   Posted 5/2/2017 5:59 PM (GMT -6)   
Took Lanie's advice and went carb free today for breakfast and for lunch.

Took blood sugar reading about 2 1/2 hours after both meals, I think you said it should be 2 hours after a meal, and both times had a reading of 107.

I was impressed, with 111-125 being pre-diabetic, I read in my notes.

Now, for supper, my health care person has brought me a free meal that has carbs.

2nd issue is, I'm about to fall on the floor from no carbs, and the lower calories from that. So, I'm going to have to break down and eat the free meal, I guess.

(Although, I know I'm now capable of eating another carb free meal. Don't know if I could make it without my usual carb snack of cold cereal and fruit.)

But I have shown myself that I can get below diabetic, by following Lanie's advice.

You said you were on a low carb diet. Can I have the first two meals of the day with no carbs, and then have a supper which has carbs?

Also, for lunch, I needed something else to eat, so I put some Cottage Cheese (not the low fat kind which has added sugar for taste, I'm thinking) in a food container which has a top.

I filled the container with water, put the top 9/10ths on, then poured out the water, without pouring out the cottage cheese. Did this 2 or 3 times.

I was satisfied that it had gotten out the 6 grams of sugar, or reduced the sugar level to 1 or 2 grams, and ate the cottage cheese, with some tomato (not with fruit, which has fruit sugar, or fructose).

I found at lunch, I need the extra food type like cottage cheese to fill up, but I also found I can rinse out most of the sugar by putting a portion of it under the tap water.

I got through the lunch meal, without fainting, by taking Lanie's advice of cutting celery in advance and putting it in a plastic bag, so all of that work is done before lunch starts.

Then, I put pimento cheese on the celery and ate a couple of stalks.

I still wasn't filled enough, so Lanie said it was OK to eat peanut butter (although it has high cholesterol, and I have high colestoral), and just eating the peanut butter by itself.

Without that, I would have fainted.

Concerning putting fruit on cottage cheese or cereal, I've read on the net where blackberries and strawberries (both 7 grams per helping) and raspberries (with only 5 grams) are the lowest in fruit sugar.

Bananas, pineapple, pears and blueberries (at about 17 grams each), are the highest in fruit sugar.

Raisins are the absolute worst, with 86 grams of sugar. I ate bananas and raisins on my cereal for years without noticing on the back of the box, that it had 86 grams of sugar, while bananas had one of the highest counts of 17 grams.

It was like eating maple syrup. But since it was fruit sugar, it was OK. No it wasn't.

So I don't have t to have any fruit on my cottage cheese, tomatoes are great, but if I do, I can have a lower fructose one like raspberries (5 grams) or blackberries or strawberries (7 grams each). But not bananas, or other higher ones listed above.

I've done this so far by using Lanie's advice above, and in her advice to "mscoleman4" and myself on 4-30-2017, which is now just above this post.

Post Edited (Tim Tam) : 5/2/2017 6:11:13 PM (GMT-6)


Lanie G
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5920
   Posted 5/2/2017 6:46 PM (GMT -6)   
Tim Tam, please excuse me but I don't remember if you said you were diagnosed as being diabetic. Do you have diabetes? And do you take any medication for diabetes? The advice I give here works for all diabetics and those who identify as "pre-diabetic" or insulin resistant but please know that I am not a doctor. If you are instructed to eat a certain way by your doctor, please discuss what you read here with him/her. My advice here is not a substitute for your doctor's advice.

Remember that a man probably might need to eat more than a woman if the man is larger (taller and heavier), so if you are hungry after eating what I'm recommending, please eat enough that you feel satisfied but not over stuffed.

Be smart and logical about what you eat. Sometimes it's better to eat smaller but more frequent meals if you can do that during the day rather than three. This practice also helps keep blood sugar more level.

Actually, I don't understand the feeling that you would fall down on the floor if you didn't eat carbs. Eating a variety of vegetables will give you carbs but the carbs will not be the high carbs found in bread products or potatoes or food with sugar.

Yes, fruit has fructose - fruit sugar - and eating melons, bananas, mangoes, pears, etc. will raise blood sugar. All the nutrients in fruit can be found in vegetables so you will not miss any nutrients if you don't eat fruit. The best fruit, the lowest on the glycemic scale, are raspberries, strawberries and blackberries. Portion out a few a day if you want. Mix a few with unsweetened yogurt if you want.

Keeping a journal of exactly what you eat, the time and your blood sugar right before you eat and about two hours after you eat will tell you how your blood sugar reacts to the food you are eating. This is a very good way to figure out what to eat.
Lanie

diabetes moderator
diabetes type 2 controlled by diet and exercise and
metformin
very low carb way of eating

Check out the following site for more info on blood sugar:
www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/

Tim Tam
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2016
Total Posts : 1021
   Posted 5/3/2017 11:31 AM (GMT -6)   
Lanie: I am diabetic, but not on insulin, but controlled with diet.

I ate the carb supper last night, after eating carb-free the 1st two meals of the day.

One of the amazing things was, after going carb free the 1st 2 meals yesterday, when I went to eat supper last night, I had reduced appetite. It was macaroni and cheese, with a veggie, not very tasty to begin with.

I ate about 2/3 of a meal of macaroni, and I didn't want to eat any more. So I figured I would eat my regular 2 snacks. I had no appetite e for either of my two usual snacks.

I went to bed thinking, yeah, I'm going to wake up at 2 a.m. staving, because the supper was so small. I didn't wake up hungry.

I've heard carbs make you more hungry. I'm wondering if having no carbs the first two meals of yesterday, made me less hungry for supper?

My blood sugar fasting this a.m. was 116, and the reading 2 1/2 hours after carb free breakfast today was 124.

Do you find eating less carbs reduces your appetite?

Could a low-carb diet, like you say you're on, include no carbs 1st 2 meals, then a carb supper?

Or, also a no-carb supper, but carb snack like cereal and fruit?

Lanie G
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5920
   Posted 5/3/2017 1:15 PM (GMT -6)   
I really don't know, Tim Tam. Since everyone is different, you have to test and keep your journal and then see what is best for you.
Lanie

diabetes moderator
diabetes type 2 controlled by diet and exercise and
metformin
very low carb way of eating

Check out the following site for more info on blood sugar:
www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/

Tim Tam
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2016
Total Posts : 1021
   Posted 5/3/2017 7:22 PM (GMT -6)   
I had said that I was not on insulin, but was supposed to be controlling my diabetes with diet.

Yet, in a way, I've never actually ever done anything to change my diet. In a way I have, in that I had already cut out sugar because of another health problem.

But I was trying to reduce that sugar intake even more. But I didn't really know what to do about really controlling the diabetes with diet.

But when you kept talking about a no or low-carb diet, and there was that suggestion for meals that you gave on this and the post to myself and "mscoleman4" on her post for 4-30-2017
I thought I would give that no or low-carb diet a try.

Also, your suggestion to take readings after various meals, carb and no-carb, etc., to see what effect those meals are having on your blood sugar count, was a great help.

When I could see on my b/s tests that a couple of no-carb meals in a row really brought my b/s down, and also reduced my appetite, it really had a reinforcing effect on me.

I had never put all of that together.

So, I do thank you for that. I would like to put some of what you said in a post, to see if others may benefit from that.

I do appreciate your knowledge and your generous spirit.

Lanie G
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5920
   Posted 5/3/2017 8:30 PM (GMT -6)   
Thank you for the kind words, Tim Tam. I am surprised that your doctor hasn't given you more information about how food (and what food) affects your blood sugar. However, to tell you the truth, sometimes medical professionals don't understand food and blood sugar. I know this from two Registered Dietitians who instructed me to eat up to 200 grams of carbs a day. If I did that, I'd been on two medications to bring down my blood sugar, not metformin.

The whole point here is controlling our blood sugar and that means to bring it to as normal levels as possible. And testing. We need to know how the food we eat affects our blood sugar. Living with high blood sugar over time can cause heart, kidney, circulation and eye problems.

So, that's my mission! Avoiding complications! And I hope you do, too!


yeah
Lanie

diabetes moderator
diabetes type 2 controlled by diet and exercise and
metformin
very low carb way of eating

Check out the following site for more info on blood sugar:
www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/

Tim Tam
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2016
Total Posts : 1021
   Posted 5/3/2017 10:15 PM (GMT -6)   
Lanie, I don't learn from reading. I've heard that some people learn from their eyes, some people learn through their ears.

I learn through my ears, but not sitting in a classroom. I learn from one on one, where I can ask questions. I might also learn through my senses, where I sense the person is not only knowledgeable but also compassionate.

I also have a learning disability.

I also learn from brevity. Don't tell me the history of the world. Tell me specifically what I need to do.

I onced asked you a week or two ago what would be good meals for no or low carb diet. You said, read the literature on this forum.

I looked at it but so much I couldn't formulate a plan from all of that information.

But I kept coming back to you.

I read what you told "mscoleman4" on the post by her name on 4-30-2017 or so, it was your first response to her first question, something about meals. You responded:

"We need to have a food plan and also do some sort of exercise on a regular basis. Food with carbohydrates will raise our blood sugar. The more bread, potatoes, rice, food made with flour and sugar that we eat, the higher our blood sugar will go. You will know this because if you test your blood sugar right before you eat and then about two hours after you finish, you will see how your blood sugar rises when you eat any of that food.

"What can you eat? Meat, chicken, fish, vegetables (but not potatoes or corn), lettuce and other leafy greens, peanut butter, eggs, milk products with no sugar added, cheese, nuts. Corn is a grain and has a lot of carbs."

"Chicken salad or tuna salad wrapped in a couple of lettuce leaves can be lunch."

So, in two paragraphs, you've told what takes some people 150 pages.

That was what got me interested, into realizing I could do this, also. I could do, chicken and lima beans for one supper, and then take my blood sugar two hours later and see what my numbers are.

I could do pork and string beans for another supper, then two hours later take a reading. I could do fish and peas the next night, and then take a reading two hours later.

From that tip, the next morning from reading that, you had flipped me to trying a non-carb meal, starting with breakfast. Then lunch, no carbs, two meals in a row, and 2 hours later, like you said, I took a reading. 107.

Whoa, some instant feedback. All of that in 3 paragraphs of data, not 150 pages.

Then lunch: "Chicken salad or tuna salad wrapped in a couple of lettuce leaves can be lunch."

Breakfast: An egg, bacon or sausage or balony or spam. A tomato. To fill up, some nuts, and wing it until lunch.

That's what flipped me: that simple 2 or 3 paragraph answer to "mscoleman4" about, what can you eat for typical meals for low or no carp meals.

You say, "I am surprised that your doctor hasn't given you more information about how food (and what food) affects your blood sugar."

My doctor did give me a few pages on lowering blood sugar. I lose it after the 3rd paragraph of blather.

And a piece of paper is not a warm human being. And a teacher standing in front of 10 or 20 students is not the same thing as communicating one on one with a compassionate, knowledgeable person.

You said, "So, that's my mission! Avoiding complications! And I hope you do, too!

I knew you were on a mission. It shows.

And with me, it's mission accomplished.

Lanie G
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5920
   Posted 5/4/2017 7:32 AM (GMT -6)   
Ok, I understand. It's great that you're making this your mission then! Your blood sugar control is so important for your health. And I'll try to make my responses less complicated for your questions.

smile
Lanie

diabetes moderator
diabetes type 2 controlled by diet and exercise and
metformin
very low carb way of eating

Check out the following site for more info on blood sugar:
www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/

Tim Tam
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2016
Total Posts : 1021
   Posted 5/4/2017 5:38 PM (GMT -6)   
Well, I just hit the wall, as predicted.

I've always said I do very well on a diet for one or two days, and then I have to eat the house down.

I can only do two pieces of lettuce for so long.

After yesterday I think going no carbs for breakfast and lunch, I tested my blood sugar 2 1/2 hours after lunch. It was 107. I had conquered the world. Maybe.

Today, the dreaded day 2 of the no or low carb diet, I hit the wall.

My body two hours after my first lunch said, you're either going to eat something, or you're going to fall on the floor. So, I started out with my favorite meal: peanut butter sandwich dipped in tomato soup.

That was for starters. Then I followed up with my favorite snack: popcorn, which you said drives you blood sugar sky high.

Hey, forget the blood sugar, we're trying to survive here.

I'm pretty sure I already know what it is. A shaking attack, from, low blood sugar.

107 is low blood sugar. Hello. My wife called them, shaking attacks, where your body begins to shake if you don't get some carbs, sugar preferably.

I rem. my mind going almost blank from low sugar to the point where I couldn't make a decision, and standing in the kitchen and asking my wife what I should eat, because I can think or make a decision. She probably suggested orange juice.

We had a service person over here one time, and she started showing sings of low blood sugar, and said something like, "What should I do?" and we suggested let us get you some orange juice, which we got for her, she drank it, and the shaking attacks stopped.

My now deceased wife's mother was shopping with my wife one time, started having a shaking attack in a drug store, and just started unwrapping and eating candy.

I've heard of diabetics being cautioned to take candy with them in case they start having a shaking attack.

So, low blood sugar and shaking attack seem to go together, and to me it's understandable. You need sugar/carbs, or you can have a low blood sugar situation and go into a coma.

Isn't that why they give some diabetics insulan? It raises their blood sugar, it lowers it, I don't know what it does. Maybe it balances their blood sugar, and doesn't let it get too high or too low.

Too high and they can black out, too low and they can go into a coma. I don't know.

But maybe the answer for me is to moderate, as you say you're doing with a low carb diet. Maybe I should be having some carbs with every meal, every other meal.

One meal a day for me, supper, with carbs, didn't do it for me. This second day of my low carb diet, I crashed after my first lunch, when I took a walk, came back, and I was weak as pond water.

I didn't have any mental or physical energy, which think carbs provide. I guess I'm going to have to start eating some carbs, some fruit, bread, with every meal, to keep my carb level, like insulan, to a certain level.

I think I'm going to have to settle for not a low of 107 b/s count on no carb meals, but around 115 or 120, better than 140.

Lanie G
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5920
   Posted 5/4/2017 5:58 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi and sorry you're having problems. Remember, I did tell you to eat more if you think you are hungry. It might be better for you to eat smaller meals every few hours.

However, 107 is not low blood sugar! That would be fine for after eating. However, if a person has been living with very high blood sugar like in the high 100's (or even higher) and then his blood sugar gets down to what normal levels are, then he might have jittery feelings and feel odd. This happens a lot to people who find out they have had uncontrolled diabetes for years and then with medication, their blood sugar is brought down to normal levels.

I have given you the best advice to keep your blood sugar near normal levels, lists of food you can eat and told you to eat more and more often. Have you read through the link in my signature? I know you said you have trouble understanding sometimes and it's better if it's more simplified, so I've tried to explain this as best I can.

I think it's best to not eat as extreme as you've been doing, then, if you feel you can't. However, I hope you can make more moderate choices without overloading on carbs and making your blood sugar swing too high.
Lanie

diabetes moderator
diabetes type 2 controlled by diet and exercise and
metformin
very low carb way of eating

Check out the following site for more info on blood sugar:
www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Friday, October 20, 2017 6:57 AM (GMT -6)
There are a total of 2,884,638 posts in 316,511 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 157631 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, TC3120.
297 Guest(s), 10 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
Alcie, Chapelle, TotesMagotes, fragilant, tickbite666, 142, auntkay, RobLee, k07, sdfsdfdsfdf09


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2017 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer