More comfortable finger sticks

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Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 3/20/2006 8:48 PM (GMT -7)   
FINGER STICKS.... we all do them for our blood sugar testing.  I've always, for as long as I can remember, used the "One touch Ultra fine" lancets.  These seemed a lot less abusive that the regular lancets that seemed to leave a crater in my finger. 
 
Soooo....I was cruising the drug store and low and behold, I found these things called "B&D Microfine 31g" lancets.  WOW!!  they are half the thickness of my Onetouch Ultrafines and really really almost completely painless.  EXTREMELY small stick.  I find if I take a finger stick right after I get up in the morning...just out of bed, there is a lot of blood in my fingers, and a tiny little stick will give me a decent drop of blood.  Soooooo...if you run out of lancets, try these.  Again they are the B&D 31g microfine lancets!  and they should work in most pen type lancet devices.
 
scool  Warren
It's not that some people have willpower and some don't. It's that some people are ready to change and others are not. - James Gordon, M.D.
What some call health, if purchased by perpetual anxiety about diet, isn't much better than tedious disease. - George Dennison Prentice

I can only please one person per day, today is not your day...tomorrow doesn't look good either.


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 3/21/2006 8:09 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks Warren for yet another great idea! I still like your insulin syringe or byetta pen under the armpit the best. It's awesome! Keep thinking up new stuff. You make diabetes easier to handle.
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: they sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


Sunday
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 59
   Posted 3/21/2006 2:17 PM (GMT -7)   
I've been testing 2-10x/day for over 40 years (although when I started we used a tablet dissolved in urine or a litmus paper test strip both of which would only tell us if our urine contained sugar and if so, that it was between 100 and 200; 200 and 300; 300 and 400; or over 400) and in my experience, it's much less painful to use the lancet by itself. Those trigger guns/lancet devices are what makes it hurt. When nurses pull those lancet devices out, I insist on doing it myself and I use the lancet alone. It's faster, too. My fingers don't have marks on them, I don't have any neuropathy and I can feel things very easily in my fingertips. Without the gun and the trigger action, You get to control the speed and the force of the lancet yourself. Much easier and less painful! My daughter (14) had it done in a nurse's office and squeeled a bit. At home she tried the lancet without a device and completely agreed with me that the lancet alone is a much better technique. I'm going to look for that BD 31g lancet. Sounds great!

Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 3/21/2006 4:02 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi sunday,

A couple things about the lancet devices.  They are VERY VERY different than the ones used in the Dr.'s offices.  They looke like pens and have an adjustable depth control.  You push a button and the lancet comes out the end for a fraction of a second and then disappears back into the penlet device.  I use my penlet on the shallowest or second to shallowest setting and it is a very tiny stick.  The other thing is, do not test on the ends of your fingers.  This is where all the nerves are concentrated.  Test on the sides of your fingers as you will still get a good drop of blood but without invoking nearly the sensitivity as a fingertip stick.  Dr's finger sticks have improved vastly over the last couple of years, but the nurses are still pretty agressive as they want to get a good drop of blood the FIRST time without having to squeeze your finger so they really stick you.  I just find the penlet device takes the guess work and reticence out of the finger stick for me.  One button push and VOILA, its over and done with and I hardly feel it at all.

scool Warren
It's not that some people have willpower and some don't. It's that some people are ready to change and others are not. - James Gordon, M.D.
What some call health, if purchased by perpetual anxiety about diet, isn't much better than tedious disease. - George Dennison Prentice

I can only please one person per day, today is not your day...tomorrow doesn't look good either.


Sunday
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 59
   Posted 3/21/2006 4:59 PM (GMT -7)   

My fingers have never hurt because of finger pricks.  Never.  And I've used a wide variety of lancets without an automated trigger device since home glucose monitoring using blood first became available.  I don't have any marks or bruises on my fingertips either, so the site is immaterial.    :-)   For me, lancet delivery devices are a waste of money.  As I mentioned though, I'm interested in trying those BD lancets you found.  I re-use mine (endos and PCP say it's fine to do so -- only the manufacturers recommend against it for obvious reasons) so the thinner and sharper, the better!  Thanks for the info. 


devine007
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2005
Total Posts : 76
   Posted 3/21/2006 10:24 PM (GMT -7)   
I too re use my lancets, I'll use one lancet for the whole day and I use the bd ultra fine 33. They are supposed to be the thinnest on the market, and they are awesome!

Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 3/22/2006 2:52 PM (GMT -7)   
Another help if you are having problems getting a drop of blood is to make a mini tourniquet out of a thick rubber band and put it on your finger. You will always be able to get a nice big drop of blood for your readings.
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: they sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


steven k
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2005
Total Posts : 58
   Posted 3/23/2006 7:08 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks Warren, I use the One Touch Ultra Soft lancets. I called and found out they are 28 gauge. They don't make a 31 gauge. The higher the gauge the thinner. They said they don't make it becaue they feel it won't give enough blood My insurance company suppli all my diabetic supplies. I think I might look into those lancets and see if they'll work in my lancing device. or maybe buy them myself. I sometime use 1 lancet 10-15 times. I just forget to change them. I've got hundreds' of them. I'm definitly going to look into it. Thank you kindly. Steve Kreloff

steven k
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2005
Total Posts : 58
   Posted 3/23/2006 7:13 PM (GMT -7)   
I use that rubber band technique. You are right. You can get alot of blood Thanks Jennie. Steve

steven k
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2005
Total Posts : 58
   Posted 3/31/2006 10:34 PM (GMT -7)   
To Warren, I called becton ****son Company at 1888 232 2737 They sent me 10-33 gauge lancets and lancet device to try. Theydo feel alot better than my 28 gauge 1 touch ultra soft. there was no charge . Ijust asked them if I could have a sample 33 gauge lancet. They sent me 10 and the lancing device. 33 gauge is the thinnest made. I believe they are the only company that makes them. Their meter also used .3 microleter of blood compared to 1.0 for one touch. I;m swithcing to the free style that uses .3 microleter of blood. My insurance company supplies me with strips Between the lancets and the different meter.it will be a little easier. Just wanted to pass this info on to you and others. Free Style meter and BD meter use the least amount of blood

Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 4/3/2006 7:43 AM (GMT -7)   
Steven,

I'm so jealous of your insurance! tongue I buy my own supplies and that's why I use the Prestige IQ meter. Cheap! Big! Uses regular batteries! But it needs big drops of blood so that's why I'm stuck using the rubberband tournequet. Glad to see you posting again. Hope you're doing well with your program. With your awesome food knowledge and the meds you're on you should be getting awesome readings! I hope so. Anyway, don't be a stranger! Your knowlege of the disease, especially your before and after experiences with insulin (or is it byetta?) are invaluable for sharing with our newbies.

You have actually become a sort of "poster child" of going thru the diabetes experience for me. You have gone thru everything from denial to being ready to be a teacher to newcomers! It's great to see someone doing so well! Take care.
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: they sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


steven k
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2005
Total Posts : 58
   Posted 4/8/2006 1:48 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks Jennie. I have U.S. Healthcare. Aetna. I. work for the Commonwealth Of Penna. I do pay attention to very meticulous, minute, details. Every carb, every 1/4 pound, every ounce of food that I eat. I check blood 4-6 times a day. I'm taking 50-50 Humalog and regular humalog for adjustments. Saw my Endo last week , she told me to use regular Humalog for undershooting insulin. Humalog is not like lantus. This insulin thing is hardly an exact science. i'm 5ft 7 inches ,145 pounds. a little goes along way. See this is not just a disease, it almost has to be a hobby if you want to keep it under control. My next A1C IS 5/1 from my primary doctor. I'm thinking if it is not 6.0 or less than maybe lantus as my Basil insulin, and regular Humalog as my bolus insulin. Thank you for kind words. I just finished reading Think like a Pancreas by Gary Scheiner MS, CDE,very good book, gained alot of insight. I'm going to the free style meter because of less blood needed.around 6/5.I get my supplies. Ijust feel we are all biochemically locked in and we have to live on a specific amount of food every day of our lives, that amount maybe different for all of us, bu that is the beginning of the story and the end of the story and we have to figure out the rest. Twice I've escaped Diabetic disaster . When first diagnosed, blurred visions, great weight loss, tingeling in toes, an terrible thirst,and about 8 months ago with A1C of 7.8. Got my wake up call. The threat is very real and very dangerous You appear to doing pretty good with this. I think this is even harder for woman because of the slower metabolic rate. I'm really glad I have insulin as one of my helpers. I just feel more confident with it. There is only 1 thing that matters and that is avoiding diabetic complications. I'm not into the game can you top this. Don't mean to sound morbid or so blunt, for me to give up . It would be like committing suicide. It would take my life 1 piece at a time. tried the egyptian river thing, you know denial, that did not work, I tried being. mad at my Doctor ,that did not work. Took my head out of the sand and that seems to be working. May all of us here try to stay very attenative and very motivated just do what we have to do. Take care, stay well -Steve Kreloff This thing is just an ongoing never ending learning experience and you have to figure alot out as you go along. You know those cakes where you just add a little water and maybe 1 egg and put it in the oven or microwave, I wish this disease was that simple, but it's not

Post Edited (steven k) : 4/8/2006 3:13:21 AM (GMT-6)

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