Good Chart: Differences between t1 and t2

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Sunday
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 59
   Posted 5/11/2006 10:50 AM (GMT -7)   
Post removed

desertdiabetic
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 115
   Posted 5/11/2006 11:31 AM (GMT -7)   
Sorry, your chart is so filled with groos errors to make it usable.

Look close - on the left side it give faces about type 1

Now look on the right and it state opinons.

For example:

Prevention for type 2 is partially preventable - you the people who contracted it becaue of genetics that they control their genes. yes, lifestyle is probable the main reason, though nobody is saying how much yet.

Management - type 1 is difficult to manage(I don't doubt this) type 2 "The condition is relatively easy to manage." - I guess they have not meet many type to diabetics these days. I personally find it easy at this point - so many others find it impossible to treat.

Treatment - except for the insulin the description fits type 2's and in some cases type 2's are insulin dependant. Dietary and lifestyle changes; in some cases oral medication or insulin. The condition is relatively easy to manage. They are now saying that some(and only some) can treat only with diet and exercise - medications are the standard - insulin is very common.

Impact: This one is what got me. On the type 1 side they state facts - and terrible facts at that. On the type 2 side they state opinon how to prevent the facts that are very similar to type 1's. Fact on one side and opinon on the other side.

Somebody needs to educate who wront this chart to the real world of both types.

I know people myself with both types = the type 2's I have known for years are going or have gone blind and have many of the complications we all fear - Yes, they could have probably prevented some or all of these - but, you know something, it is not that easy just to say that they could have had they been better educated - it is far more complex than that.
type 2 - dx 12/04
metformin 500mg 3x - avandia 2mg 2x


Sunday
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 59
   Posted 5/11/2006 11:49 AM (GMT -7)   
It's not "my" chart. Did you note the publisher? The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

desertdiabetic
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 115
   Posted 5/11/2006 12:04 PM (GMT -7)   
First off - I do not attack anyone here..... I know it is not your personal chart... I did not mean that it was. It would be "my" chart had I posted it.

As far as who posted it what difference does it make? Using facts on one side and opinion on the other is apples and oranges. I would like to koow what percentage of type 2's have complicatons.

If anyone can find a chart that treats both sides in the same manner than there wouid be something to talk about.

Actually this chart(I almost said "your" again) just points out how they are so similar, but just not stating the facts that would show this.
type 2 - dx 12/04
metformin 500mg 3x - avandia 2mg 2x


Sunday
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 59
   Posted 5/11/2006 12:27 PM (GMT -7)   
I didn't think you were trying to attack anyone desertdiabetic I merely wanted to point out that you were accusing the JDRF -- not me -- of publishing "gross errors".

There's a great outlook for t2s that the chart depicts. T2s have much more control over their health than do t1s. (Another difference). Why is that something to be defensive about? I would think its a cause for celebration.

desertdiabetic
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 115
   Posted 5/11/2006 1:01 PM (GMT -7)   
It is a cause for celebration - but again not such a diference where we cannot help each other. I believe they dispict the type 2 situation incorrectly - I am afraid the outlook is not as rosey as they say. I would say it can be for a certain group of type 2's. Those diagnosed early enough to control it and those capable of knowing what has to be done. You will read on these forums so many times where the doctor did not explain anything to the person, my case included. To this day my doctor has not discussed possible complications or exercise(other than saying it helps to change diet and to exercise)

Not so much gross erros as a very poor way of comparing the two. It is common for people to make an arguement for their side with facts and state the other side with opinon. That is what they are doing. It looks more like had to lay out the differences without even knowing the differences - where are the facts about complications that plague type 2's - all it says is If people with type 2 diabetes maintain a healthy weight, eat sensibly and exercise regularly they can greatly reduce the likelihood of complications. That is true, but where are the numbers? This only says in the perfect world type 2's can head off complications. Type 1's cannot head them off by the same methods? I believe they can. Very gloomy outlook for type 1's - and I don't believe accurate.
type 2 - dx 12/04
metformin 500mg 3x - avandia 2mg 2x


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 5/11/2006 1:39 PM (GMT -7)   
Sunday and Dessert,

This chart is simplistic and flawed. (For example, there is a tribe of Native Americans that we learned about in class that are almost 100% diabetic by adulthood if they eat normal grocery store food. How the heck are they supposed to 'prevent' getting diabetes? And on the other hand it paints a terrible picture of Type 1's prognosis. In both cases early diagnosis, correct treatment, correct diet and healthy living will prolong life and avert complications to some degree.)

Maybe we could work together to come up with out own chart?
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


Sunday
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 59
   Posted 5/11/2006 2:06 PM (GMT -7)   
I agree and think its doing more harm than good so if you can delete it, I think you should. I completely disagree with the comments about long-term t1 outlook for complications and the AACE (American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists) conference two weeks ago here in Chicago didn't (as I've been told) present anything to counter previous data on the subject. The outlook isn't pleasant -- and that's reality. I maintain an optimistic outlook but one that's not afraid of confronting the data. I can postpone many things I cannot altogether avoid while wanting to live a long life with a decent level of quality as a nearly life-long t1 who wants to live to be 84 or so. Them's the facts. Would I trade conditions with you? darn right I would. Does that make me somehow more of a victim than you? Probably. Is that a highly controversial thing to say? Sure it is.

PS I worked with a tribe in Lummi Island, Washington for a few years and my father is Cherokee. (I'm Cherokee, Swedish, and Irish -- what a combo, eh?) Anyway, a genetic predisposition + normal grocery food + sedentary life styles (many indian tribes are not engaged in the traditionally physical lifestyles and are actually quite sedentary as a culture) equals 100% risk factor for T2 in some people. It's possible that had that tribe been raised in an asian country eating an asian diet and physically active -- there would be a different outcome. Alcoholism is another genetic threat to the American Indian and avoidance is becoming a public health mandate. The risk of alcohol consumption, like sugar and processed food for some people, is very high.

desertdiabetic
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 115
   Posted 5/11/2006 2:32 PM (GMT -7)   
The information that makes up any chart like this is being changed all the time. More and more is being learned about type 2. I don't know that is necessarily true about type 1 though. Yes, there are a lot of things that are being promised down the road that sound like a cure, but don't get your hopes up yet. A cure has been in the works for who knows how long.

Type 2 this is different. New drugs are there and they are reporting more and more about reversing it when caught early enough. The sad part is that for type 2 it is in the education you get and the lifestyle you have to live. I say have to live because so many people just cannot change their diet and exercise because it is a good idea. There are so many different living situations that are against them. A bigger problem is the time it takes to diagnose type 2. Type 1 gets diagnosed fairly quickly - well, diagnose it soon or die. That surely is a difference in the two. Some and possible many type 2 never get diagnosed. They throw around up to 10 years a lot before being diagnosed, a lot can happen to a person in that time.

I can see why you(Sunday) would say that you would trade conditions - Look closer and you will see that wuold not always be a good trade. Myself, sure you could control easily and probably live as long as you normally would as a non-diabetic. Many type 2's would be a bad trade - too late to reverse the complications - and they are bad just like type 1's face.
type 2 - dx 12/04
metformin 500mg 3x - avandia 2mg 2x

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