diabetes and skin problems?

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SarahBarah
New Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 5/20/2006 1:24 AM (GMT -7)   
i'm sure people have already posted about this but i'm new and haven't poked around that much...but i was wondering whether anyone could give me some info on diabetes and skin problems? i'm 19 and have had type for 9 years now, and i've developed skin issues over the past few years that are ruining my self esteem. my a1c is very good, but i'm still developing stretch marks all over, i've got cellulite, and my skin is very dry. i feel disgusting and i'm desperate to make it better...what about diabetes makes these things happen, and what can i do to have normal skin again? thanks!

Hoping2BWell
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 537
   Posted 5/20/2006 5:36 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi SarahBarah,

I am sorry that you are plagued with skin problems. We diabetics inheirit a slew of other medical problems. I came across this info and thought you might be interested:

"How can diabetes hurt my skin?

VIEW IMAGE
Drinking fluids helps keep your skin moist and healthy.

Diabetes can hurt your skin in two ways:

  1. If your blood glucose is high, your body loses fluid. With less fluid in your body, your skin can get dry. Dry skin can be itchy, causing you to scratch and make it sore. Also, dry skin can crack. Cracks allow germs to enter and cause infection. If your blood glucose is high, it feeds germs and makes infections worse. Skin can get dry on your legs, feet, elbows, and other places on your body.

  2. Nerve damage can decrease the amount you sweat. Sweating helps keep your skin soft and moist. Decreased sweating in your feet and legs can cause dry skin.

What can I do to take care of my skin?

  • After you wash with a mild soap, make sure you rinse and dry yourself well. Check places where water can hide, such as under the arms, under the breasts, between the legs, and between the toes.
    VIEW IMAGE
    Keep your skin moist by washing with a mild soap and using lotion or cream after you wash.


  • Keep your skin moist by using a lotion or cream after you wash. Ask your doctor to suggest one.

  • Drink lots of fluids, such as water, to keep your skin moist and healthy.

  • Wear all-cotton underwear. Cotton allows air to move around your body better.

  • Check your skin after you wash. Make sure you have no dry, red, or sore spots that might lead to an infection.

  • Tell your doctor about any skin problems."

The American Diabetes Association put this info out:

"Skin Care


Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including the skin. As many as one third of people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time in their lives. In fact, such problems are sometimes the first sign that a person has diabetes. Luckily, most skin conditions can be prevented or easily treated if caught early.

Good Skin Care


 

There are several things you can do to head off skin problems:

  • Keep your diabetes well managed. People with high glucose levels tend to have dry skin and less ability to fend off harmful bacteria. Both conditions increase the risk of infection.

  • Keep skin clean and dry. Use talcum powder in areas where skin touches skin, such as armpits and groin.

  • Avoid very hot baths and showers. If your skin is dry, don't use bubble baths. Moisturizing soaps, such as Dove or Basis, may help. Afterward, use an oil-in-water skin cream, such as Lubriderm or Alpha-Keri. But don't put lotions between toes. The extra moisture there can encourage fungus to grow.

  • Prevent dry skin. Scratching dry or itchy skin can open it up and allow infection to set in. Moisturize your skin to prevent chapping, especially in cold or windy weather.

  • Treat cuts right away. Wash minor cuts with soap and water. Do not use Mercurochrome antiseptic, alcohol, or iodine to clean skin because they are too harsh. Only use an antibiotic cream or ointment if your doctor says it's okay. Cover minor cuts with sterile gauze. See a doctor right away if you get a major cut, burn, or infection.

  • During cold, dry months, keep your home more humid. Bathe less during this weather, if possible.

  • Use mild shampoos. Do not use feminine hygiene sprays.

  • See a dermatologist (skin doctor) about skin problems if you are not able to solve them yourself."

I hope this is what you need. If it does not cover all of what you would like to know, e-mail me and I'll see what else I can come up with.

God bless and stay well,

Madelyn


I am in my 50s. Crohn's Disease (since childhood), pancreatitis, diabetes, neuropathy, arthritis, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, asthma, Rosecea. I have had 4 surgeries including pancreas/sphincterplasty, duodenum, resection, proctectomy with sigmoid colonectomy. I have a permanent colostomy.___________________                 ____________________
There's nowhere I can hide that God can't find me, nowhere I can go that God can't help me.


Hoping2BWell
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 537
   Posted 5/20/2006 6:22 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi again SarahBarah,

In searching through my "stuff", I found this:

"Dry Skin Treatment for Diabetics

 January 11th 2006

Skin problems and diabetes are so closely associated that diabetes is often first diagnosed by dermatologists. Several changes to the skin, including boils, blisters called 'diabetic bullae', skin tags, dark skin around the neck and fingers, and dry skin, indicate the possibility of diabetes.

What is diabetes and how does it cause skin problems? Many think diabetes is the result of eating too much sugar. In fact it is a problem with the immune system. In a healthy body, specialized cells (called beta cells) manufacture insulin in the pancreas. Insulin is a hormone responsible for transporting glucose to the cells. The body then burns the glucose, creating carbon dioxide, water and energy. The body cannot maintain a healthy condition without this process. In type one diabetes, the immune system attacks beta cells – mistaking them for invaders. In type two diabetes, insulin is still manufactured, but in quantities below the needs of the body.

Diabetes causes damage to several organs, and to blood vessels and small nerves. This, in turn, promotes dry skin. In diabetics it is vital to take care of dry skin as it can lead to serious infections and ulceration.

Although discovering that one has diabetes can be frightening, it is often manageable by maintaining proper weight, eating a good diet, and exercising. Also, although there is no proven cure as yet, research in the area has progressed and scientists are hopeful that there may be a cure in the near future.

Until that time, diabetics need to take care of their skin. Doctors always include a daily skin care routine in their recommendations. Dry skin treatment for a diabetic starts with controlling environmental factors such as keeping the temperature as low as is comfortable, increasing humidity, wearing gloves when using any kind of solvent, avoiding extremely hot baths and showers, and wearing clothes made of natural fibers.

Keeping the skin moist is also very important. However, most moisturizers contain ingredients that cause the skin to produce less moisture. A good
shielding lotion has been found to be most effective as a dry skin treatment."

Check with your doctor or pharmacist for the best lotion for you tongue !
 
God bless and stay well,
 
Madelyn



I am in my 50s. Crohn's Disease (since childhood), pancreatitis, diabetes, neuropathy, arthritis, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, asthma, Rosecea. I have had 4 surgeries including pancreas/sphincterplasty, duodenum, resection, proctectomy with sigmoid colonectomy. I have a permanent colostomy.___________________                 ____________________
There's nowhere I can hide that God can't find me, nowhere I can go that God can't help me.

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