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VegasHill
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2006
Total Posts : 23
   Posted 6/15/2006 8:48 AM (GMT -7)   
I was wondering...I know that alcohol has alot of sugar and unfortunately, I loke the fru-fru drinks...I hate hate hate beer...what can I drink?
Hilary
 
 
"The dirtiest book of all is the expurgated book"
         -Walt Whitman


nannarungodo
New Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 18
   Posted 6/15/2006 9:49 AM (GMT -7)   

My personal feelings are that you must be careful of alcohol.  It can interact with other medications for diabetes.  I don't use alcohol because I chose to make a healthy choices in my life style - because I have enough trouble keeping my blood sugars under control without throwing a monkey wrench into the mix. I am not preaching - just saying it isn't a good choice for a diabetic to make. You really should ask your doctor perhaps he/she can give you some ideas on how to subsitute the sugar in your alcoholic beverages. 

Teresa


gallyndur
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2005
Total Posts : 43
   Posted 6/15/2006 10:29 AM (GMT -7)   
Does anyone know where you can look up just how much sugar is in different types of alcoholic beverages? Nutrirtional information isn't printed on the label, which makes it really hard to know just how bad a drink is. I particularly like Bailey's and the like but have no clue how much sugar is in that stuff.

Thanks,
Heather

Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 6/15/2006 11:42 AM (GMT -7)   

Alcohol puts a huge burden on your liver and guess where glucose synthethesis occurs that you need to keep your blood sugar under control!!  You guessed it; in your liver.  Liver disease associated with diabetes is usually insidious, asymptomatic and goes undetected until a severe condition, such as liver cancer, occurs. It is a well known fact that diabetes can damage your liver. Now couple this with the added pressure that your meds are putting on your kidneys and liver . . . drinking for someone that has diabetic tendencies is just plain stupid.

scool Warren


It's not that some people have willpower and some don't. It's that some people are ready to change and others are not. - James Gordon, M.D.
What some call health, if purchased by perpetual anxiety about diet, isn't much better than tedious disease. - George Dennison Prentice

I can only please one person per day, today is not your day...tomorrow doesn't look good either.

Post Edited (Warren) : 6/15/2006 2:23:08 PM (GMT-6)


Jaclyn1
New Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 8
   Posted 6/15/2006 12:01 PM (GMT -7)   
I pretty much quit drinking when I got D but IF I drink itll be vodka and sprite zero, both have no carbs and no sugar. I have never gotten a rise in sugars drinking those but again thats like once a month. I too want to be healty but a nice drink before bed is good too.
Type 2
Metformin 500g 2x daily
March 4, 2006 A1c 11.0
May 5, 2006 A1c 7.9


nannarungodo
New Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 18
   Posted 6/15/2006 12:26 PM (GMT -7)   
I agree with Warren 100%- but I was afraid to put it so strong. Diabetes is such a scary disease when you really educate yourself on what could happen if you don't take care of yourself, AND your heart, AND your kidneys,AND your liver,AND your eyes. I am just a granny woman from the South and don't understand anyone risking their health for a drink. I myself want to see my babies and babie's babies grow up and grow old. I do declare I was floored when I saw the question this is a very serious issue and should not be taken lightly.

desertdiabetic
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 115
   Posted 6/15/2006 1:37 PM (GMT -7)   
I don't drink so I speak from that perspective.

Warren is correct that the liver is worked more with alcohol. I don't think a little bit of the right alcohol stresses it too much. The key is limited amounts. Apparently the sugar in alcohol beverages does not convert the same as in soft drinks - there is a difference. Even Bernstein says small amounts of dry wine is okay - the key again is if you have control limit the amount. Some alcohol can actually lower you blood glucose levels some - for insulin injecting diabetics this takes on a different concern. It is too easy to just say refrain from all uses - for people like myself who can do without it even socially it is easy - the real world is not that easy sometimes.
type 2 - dx 12/04
metformin 500mg 3x - avandia 2mg 2x


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 6/15/2006 8:25 PM (GMT -7)   
If you want to know about alcohol and diabetes just talk to a pharmacist... They will make Warren look like a kitty cat! Metformin, avandia, glucotrol and all the rest of the diabetic meds should come with "Do Not Drink Alcohol with this Medication" stickers on them. If your pill bottles don't have those stickers.. get a new drugstore!

Drinking with diabetes will lead to cirrhosis of the liver, a progressive disease that is fatal. Unfortunately by the time the jaundice and yellow eyes show up it's too late to save you without a liver transplant. But we digress...

Vegas, you wanted to know what to drink... I choose not to drink alcohol and instead have water with lemon or lime, diet soda, mint sun tea, or crystal light. It's difficult when you first find out that you can't drink at all... I sometimes felt a little left out with our friends when everyone was tying one on.. But I have come to grips with my disease and choose to try to hang on to my liver. Bartenders can goof up regular vs. diet sodas but they can't screw up water with lemon!
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


desertdiabetic
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 115
   Posted 6/16/2006 11:41 AM (GMT -7)   
Of course, it seems, I don't necessarily agree. I did google both Metformin and Avandia. On Avandia's own site they don't even mention alcohol use. I do find that they say limit its use because it lowers blood glucose numbers and might drive you hypo. Avandia says to consult with your MD if you do consume, in limited quantities, any alcohol.

Metformin says refrain from excessive use of alcohol. Well, duh!

I only mention this because placing an absolute restriction on something that does not require it only make diabetes even worse, for some people. I could be told that and it would not bother me at all. There are too many times and situations where one drink could be 'acceptable' for those who find it so. I don't believe in drawing a line in the sand(desertdiabetic you know) just because some people cannot follow the limited amount rule. If you cannot control to a very limited on special occasion then you should totaly refrain from any use.
type 2 - dx 12/04
metformin 500mg 3x - avandia 2mg 2x


Chutsman
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2005
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 6/17/2006 7:00 PM (GMT -7)   

I too was under the impression that alcohol was bad for diabetics, but I recently found out that it was not for the reasons I thought.  I was sitting in the doctors office a few months ago and was reading a health magazine and there in black and white it said that alcohol LOWERS blood sugar level.  That's right it LOWERS it.  When I went in to the doctor he verified it.  So that is the reason one should not take alcohol with the BS meds - your bs level might go too low!!!

So I'm happily drinking my glass of red wine with dinner. yeah yeah    Other than that, though, I do not drink alcohol.


The short form for "you are" is "you're", NOT "your".


Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 6/18/2006 6:48 AM (GMT -7)   

::sighs:: Yes, the warning labels on many diabetic meds are there to keep you from drinking Alcohol and suffering a bout of hypoglycemia. HOWEVER, many of the new meds, REQUIRE the doctor to do a liver panel once every 60 to 90 days to make sure the drugs are not causing liver damage. Without going into boring technical detail, there are a whole host of diabetes drugs that put a lot of "pressure" on your liver to do more than it has been doing.  Add Alcohol to the mix and its a silent long term recipe for disaster.  Can one drink a night hurt you?  Dunno.  Do I want to risk it?  Nope!  I can live without it.  Its bad enough that I have to take meds with a horrible track record for kidney and liver damage to begin with!

scool Warren
It's not that some people have willpower and some don't. It's that some people are ready to change and others are not. - James Gordon, M.D.
What some call health, if purchased by perpetual anxiety about diet, isn't much better than tedious disease. - George Dennison Prentice

I can only please one person per day, today is not your day...tomorrow doesn't look good either.


desertdiabetic
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 115
   Posted 6/18/2006 7:18 AM (GMT -7)   
Warren, you bring up an interesting point - one of my "reasons for hating the medical profession." Drug companies say that you should be tested every so often for possible liver diamage. In the 18 or so months I have been on these meds, my doctor has not once told me to rescehedule for any testing. I on my own picked 3 months fo rthe first year and then 6 months. Even then he dose not automatically do the tests - I have to ask him to run them.

I take care of my wifes 88 year old aunt, with her. She has been on these meds for years and has never been tested again for liver damage. Oh, maybe she has when she has gone in for some other problem and they run a blood test, who knows. They don't say. That retest for ppssible liver damage really is a "CYA" for the drug companies and the doctors don't really seem to care.

Change doctors, you say? Not practical, considering the insurance we both have. Besides, i dont really think it is an isolated case.

Off topic a little.....
type 2 - dx 12/04
metformin 500mg 3x - avandia 2mg 2x

Post Edited (desertdiabetic) : 6/18/2006 9:18:47 AM (GMT-6)


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 6/19/2006 6:40 AM (GMT -7)   
I have no insurance and have to pay for my own testing but I get it done. It is worth it to know that my kidneys and liver are 'happy' as my doc says. For anyone who's interested you can have the labs send you a copy of your results and look up the values on the internet. Most forms have a box or blank in the upper right corner that say "Copy to: _____" Just fill in 'patient' and you'll get a copy in the mail. It's very reassuring to get the confirmation on paper that all your hard work is getting results or that maybe it's time to eat more vegetables and less red meat or whatever. It's also nice to have those numbers in hand for your next doctor visit and be able to ask questions about meds, lifestyle and such and how to fix stuff. My doctor is very pleased to partner in my health care rather than have to bear the entire responsibility of how I manage my diabetes. I get to go to her for healthy suggestions rather than reprimands because I can see my own results and know ahead of time what I'm doing right or wrong.
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


desertdiabetic
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 115
   Posted 6/19/2006 6:48 AM (GMT -7)   
Jeannie,

I get my test done at my doctors office. I have to wait 2 weeks for result, which is probably typical. Their policy is to have the doctor see me before giving me the results. I am not charged for this visit but it sure is a pain. I have got them once without seeing the doctor - one result was out of range and I wanted to know why. That was the time the doctor(not my doctor) told me that I was cured. A wasted visit for sure.

When I see the doctor they don't tell me the results. They only tell me that they are "Ok" or they are "In range." For some reason they don't think the numbers would mean anything to me. Even to this day he acts surpirsed when I ask for a copy. Having the printed results in front of me makes a big difference later when my memory has failed me. Besides, he does not tell me where in range I am, and that does make a difference.
type 2 - dx 12/04
metformin 500mg 3x - avandia 2mg 2x


spooky
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 101
   Posted 6/20/2006 5:58 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi everybody,

                   I quote"

Alcohol production in the body

However, it is inevitable that humans intake some moderate amount of alcohol, even if they never drink in their lives. This is because many of the bacteria in our intestines use alcohol fermentation as a form of respiration. This metabolic method produces alcohol as a waste product, in the same way that our metabolism results in the formation of carbon dioxide and water. Thus, we always intake some quantity of alcohol, which is produced by these benign bacteria. In fact, if we eat enough carbohydrates (a few pieces of bread, for instance), the alcohol levels in our bowels can soar to the equivalent of a few ounces of wine, some quantity of which will inevitably be absorbed by the intestinal wall, and thus circulated throughout our bloodstream. In nature, the quantity of alcohol necessary to prevent heart disease is mostly produced by these microorganisms."unquote.

                                                           hope all ya teetotallers find this interesting!

 


spooky
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 101
   Posted 6/20/2006 6:15 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi there,

              the point is well taken that in diabetics with below par liver function and those on medicines (eg:Avandia) that can harm the liver,alcohol is a definite NO-NO.

              I again quote"Doll et al. (2005) published the results of a 23-year prospective study of 12,000 male British physicians aged 48-78, finding that overall mortality was significantly lower in the group consuming an average of 2-3 "units" (standard alcoholic drinks) per day than in the non-alcohol-drinking group (relative risk 0.81, confidence interval 0.76-0.87, P = 0.001).[5] The authors noted that the causes of death that are already known to be augmentable by alcohol accounted for only 5% of the deaths (1% liver disease, 2% cancer of the mouth, pharynx, larynx, or oesophagus, and 2% external causes of death) and were significantly elevated only among men consuming >2 units/day"THIS STUDY IS CALLED THE "PHYSICIANS HEALTH STUDY".

Quote"

In a 1996 American Heart Association scientific statement, Thomas A. Pearson, MD, Ph.D noted, "A large number of observational studies have consistently demonstrated a J-shaped relation between alcohol consumption and total mortality. This relation appears to hold in men and women who are middle aged or older. The lowest mortality occurs in those who consume one or two drinks per day. In teetotalers or occasional drinkers, the rates are higher than in those consuming one or two drinks per day. In persons who consume three or more drinks per day, total mortality climbs rapidly with increasing numbers of drinks per day."

                                             I hope this adds some spice to the on-going discussion!

 


desertdiabetic
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 115
   Posted 6/20/2006 6:22 AM (GMT -7)   
You are making an argument for even less alcohol? The fact that the body produces is some form alcohol does not mean we should add more. I know, just above I said it was ok to have small amounts, and I still feel that. I don't think it is good for us, but somewhere there is a 'real life' factor that comes in. There are many chemicals we try to avoid that are in fact already present in our body, already produced by our body. Being there is not a reason to add more. I think the teetotalleres can still stand on principle here and not worry. The question is can the diabetic justify even small amounts of alcohol intake without harming or possibly harming their liver? As you can see by the above comments some say yes and some say no. Thet is typical about just about everything when it comes to what a diabetic thinks about what they can consume.

NOTE: I was writing this as your second post came on. I am talking about the first post and comments prior.....
type 2 - dx 12/04
metformin 500mg 3x - avandia 2mg 2x

Post Edited (desertdiabetic) : 6/20/2006 7:25:50 AM (GMT-6)

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