DIABETIC FOODS Good info for all!

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
40 posts in this thread.
Viewing Page :
 1  2 
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

Pin Cushion
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 442
   Posted 8/4/2006 10:01 PM (GMT -7)   
THIS IS A REPOST OF A REAL GOOD ONE FROM A WHILE AGO THAT NEEDS TO BE SHARED AGAIN:
 
 
DIABETIC FOODS And Shopping For Them: My Experiences Living With A Diabetic:

For the most part, diabetic foods usually consist of several key ingredients that must be considered.
"Checking ALL the labels" every time will help to make the best choices.
Moderation and quantity are also key to keeping blood glucose levels down to exceptable parameters.
 
Always remember this:
 
1. Low or No Sugar.
2. Low or No Trans Fats.
3. Lowest possible Saturated Fats in combination (Total Fats including Trans Fats).
4. Low or No Carb.
5. Low or No Cholesterol.
6. Low Quantities at mealtimes, all the time!
 
When shopping for diabetic foods, be sure to "check the label" information of every single item.
This takes a lot of time to do this when your in the store, but the results are well worth it.
You CAN NOT ESCAPE totally from sugar, fat, carbs, and cholesterol!!!
Generic brands are just as good as major brand names and, for the most part, will usually taste just as good if not better! This is a plus when dealing with the limited availability of diabetic foods on a very limited, fixed income food budget.
Also, there are ton's of diabetic recipe's online, such as diabetic main course meals and desserts...even diabetic chocolate Fudge!      Yes, I said Fudge!
 
Foods To Look For:
 
Bare in mind when shopping for diabetic foods that the brands and their contents vary greatly. "Checking each and every label" is essential when shopping for a diabetic person.
You'll soon learn, like I did, that the amounts of sugar, saturated fats, carbs, and cholesterol in food items now a days can be massive!  I never realized just how much until I actually started looking!
Common sense will result in a good variety of meals that don't have to taste bad or bland.
Experiment with different brands for taste and content and let your diabetic patient be the judge of what she or he wants. Choices and variety of meals for diabetics are always welcomed.
Even Non-Diabetic people may like some, if not all, of the items listed here too...I know I do.

Cereals-  Walmart's brand (Great Value) is just as good as the brand name. Great Value Rice Crispies are good as are the Rice & Corn Cheks style and Raisin Bran type. All of these are Great Value Brand.
Cheerios is also very low in sugars and fats plus it's whole grain too.
Try to avoid the "kiddies" cereals. They are loaded with Sugar and Fat. Check the labels and you'll see what I mean.
Diabetic children will also benefit from purchasing these types of food.
 
Breads- Sara Lee now has a White Wheat Bread that is quite tasty with lower sugar.
Also, I have seen a Sugar Free Bread out now too, but name eludes me at this time so, Check the Label! Other whole grain brands of bread out there may be just as good so long as the sugar and fat levels are exceptable.
 
Milk- Hood Carb Countdown Fat Free brand milk is very low in sugar and saturated fats. Also comes in Chocolate too!
Hood used to make an Orange Juice too, but I am no longer able to find it here.
However, Minutemade Light is a good substitute if you use a little less of it.
For creaming of coffee and tea, Walmart's Great Value Non-Dairy Creamer has no sugar and the low price makes for a good choice for diabetics on a fixed income.
 
Yogarts- Most Diabetic people can eat yogart too. Dannon Light' n Fit Carb Control is very low in sugar and has very little fat. Also comes in a Fiber style with multiple flavors.
 
Oatmeal- Quaker Oats Low Sugar Instant Oatmeal brand comes in flavors and is low in Sugar. Tasty too!
Walmart's Great Value Quick Oats are a good choice for plain oatmeal to eat or bake with.
 
Non-Sugar Sugar- For coffee and tea, Walmart Great Value sweetner is the best and has no aftertaste. Comes in individual measured packets. Can be used for baking if you can find larger containers of it. I can no longer find larger packages of it here though.
 
Non-Sugar Sugar- For baking, Splenda, Splenda For Baking, and Splenda Brown Sugar is best. Splenda for Baking is half sugar or less in it, but cuts down on just straight sugar by approximately 50% or more.
 
Pancakes and Syrup- Hungry Jack Light & Fluffy is best and has lower sugar.
The "Add Water Only" type is best for ease of cooking.
Mrs. Butterworths Sugar Free syrup tastes the best and Log Cabin Sugar Free is also available.
 
Ice Cream- Bryers Heart Smart is low in sugar and fat and tastes good too. Healthy Choice brands of ice creams are lower in sugar, but the taste is not as good.
 
Canned Fruits- Walmart's Great Value-No Sugar Added canned fruit is very low in sugar and tastes ok too. Also, Walmart's Great Value Apple Sauce with Splenda is lower in sugar.
Other brands of No Sugar Added Fruits may be comparable. Check the Label.
 
Jelly- Smuckers Sugar Free Jelly is by far the best out there. Tastes really good with several flavors.(Strawberry is the favorite here!). This is just plain good!
 
Peanut Butter- The best tasting peanut butter we have found is Skippy's Low Carb. Sugar levels are low as are saturated fats.
Another peanut butter that is good is Walmart's Great Value. It is low in sugar, but has a higher saturated fat content, but a cheaper price.
 
cookies- Voortman's Sugar Free Chocolate Waffer cookies and Murphy's Sugar Free cookies (any flavor) are very good. Also, Archway has now come out with sugar free flavors too. Make sure to check the labels for fat content and cholesterol levels.
 
Meats- Beef and Pork-  When buying meats of any kind for a diabetic, sugar is not too much of an issue.
Fats in and on the meats ARE a concern though.
As a former butcher, I have learned to trim as much fat off of the meats as possible. Use a very sharpe knife to do this and use caution! All remaining fat must be removed after cooking too.
Ask the local butcher for the leanest possible cuts and let them know that it IS for a diabetic person.
 
Poultry- Chicken and Turkey always have fat under the skin. Also, the skin should be removed every time anyway for diabetics, so just remove all skin and fat just to be sure.
Boneless Breast portions of chicken and turkey are the leanest parts of the bird. Check the portions for any fat and remove it. Also, a good washing is necessary and pat dry it afterwards prior to cooking.
 
Duck- Try to avoid Duck meat! Duck is very greasy and is very high in saturated fats.
 
Venison- If you are a hunter with diabeties, Venison is very lean almost to the point of being dry.
Baking of Venison Roasts works best in a baking bag with veggies and will stay relatively moist.
If you make your own Venison Burger, adding fat can be done but use as little as possible. Diabetic Persons should have no worries with this meat in careful moderation only.
 
Butter and Butter Substitues-  For the most part, regular butter is a no-no!
As much as we all love butter, the saturated fats, cholesterol, carbs and sugars in butter are very bad for diabetic people.
However, Butter Substitues such as "I Can't Believe It's Not Butter Light" are much better to use.
It has no Trans Fats, No Cholesterol, No Carbs, and No Sugar. It does have a little Saturated Fat, but not enough to worry about in moderation.
It comes in spread or spray and tastes pretty good too!
 
Popcorn-  The best popcorn we have found is the Orville Redenbacher Smart Pop.(I think that's the name).  It has lower sugar and saturated fat then regular brands of popcorn. You can also use the "I Can't Believe It Not Butter Light" Spray too, if you like butter on your popcorn.
 
Potato Chips-  Don't even think about it!
Unless the new baked chips are ok. Check the label.
We have not tried the baked chips yet, but I'll have to look at them next time around.
 
Candy-  Sugar Free candy is becoming more and more popular and available.
The brand we eat at our house is Russell Stover's Sugar Free. It comes in multiple flavors and it's  pretty good too. Like anything else though, moderation is key for a diabetic person.
Whitman's Sugar Free Sampler is also very good and makes nice gifts for diabetic people.
 
Pasta's-  If you want to make pasta for a diabetic, most of the brands are ok. Muellers and Creamette brand pasta's are very low in fat, sugar and usually have no or low cholesterol.
Mostly, it's what you put on it that makes or breaks the meal.
After a lot label checking, I found that the Paul Newman Brand of sauce is low in sugar and fat and tastes best to us. There are Low Carb brands of sauce out there too, but the taste leaves something to be desired.
Always check the labels before you buy.
Spaghetti sauces, like Paul Newman's, do have some sugar and some fat but the quantity the diabetic person eats, like any other food, will dictate their glucose readings.
Eating any heavy, winter type foods must be done with caution and moderation by anyone who's a diabetic.
 
Rices- Most rice is usually ok to eat for diabetics. For ease of use, Uncle Ben's 90 Second Microwave Rice is good. Just be careful of what you put on it.
Minute Rice is also a good choice too.
Once again, quantity should be limited.
Any rices, potato's, pasta, etc. are pure starch. Starch is converted to sugar by the body so be careful.
 
Soups- For the most part, soups in general are fairly low in sugar and fat... some more then others though.
Good Old Campbell's Chicken Noodle soup is low in sugar, fat, and cholesterol plus it tastes good too.
Other Campbell's soups can be low in sugar, fat, and cholesterol but be sure to check the labels every time.
A better choice is "Maruchan Ramen Noodle" Soup. These soups are mostly noodles, but are very filling and usually have less then 1 gram of sugar. Ramen Soups are also very cheap! You can buy a whole box of them for next to nothing, which is handy for fixed income diabetic folks.
Adding some lean baked chicken breast to the chicken flavored soup makes a real hardy meal. They also have beef, pork, and shrimp flavors too.
Other soups, like Progresso or similar, are much higher in sugar, saturated fats and cholesterol. Although good, they are not a good choice for a diabetic person.
One more note on soups: Making your own homemade soup is better in the long run. Make sure the ingredients you add are low or no sugar, fats, etc.
Soup starters such as Wyler's Soup Starter and Noir Soup Starter with fat-trimmed meats added are better tasting and are probably just as low in sugar and fat as commercially made soups.
 
Diabetic Desserts-  As mentioned earlier, there are plenty of recipe's online and in cookbooks for diabetic people.
As far as shopping for items to make these desserts, you do have some choices.
 
Cakes & Stuff- Although hard to find now, the CarbSense Foods brands are/were good.
I used to buy the Chocolate Cake MiniCarb Mixes made by CarbSense.

For baking homemade cakes, muffins, etc. Splenda, Splenda For Baking, & Splenda Brown Sugar will be very helpful.
For other items you can buy from the store, Jello Instant Sugar Free Fat Free Puddings and Jello Instant Sugar Free Gellatins are a real winner for diabetic people. Adding a little No Sugar Added fruit to them makes for a better dessert.
Also, a real God-Send for diabetic people is Cool Whip! It is known as "Free Food" for diabetics and is bought in great quantities at our house!
Mixing it with Jello Sugar Free Puddings makes for a tasty treat.
A "glob" of Cool Whip on Jello Sugar Free Gellatin is a plus for diabetic folks too!
Both the Puddings and Gellatins come in multiple, sugar free, fat free flavors and are a mainstay at our house.
 
Diabetic Pies-  As with any type of baking, Splenda, Splenda For Baking, and Splenda Brown Sugar are the best choices.
Walmart's Great Value No Sugar Added Pie Fillings have "lower" sugar and fat and seem the best tasting, plus the price is better then the brand names.
For pie crusts, Walmart's Great Value pre-made pie crusts are a little "lower" in sugar and fat then most as well as a low price.
We try to keep several of these on hand at any given time...just in case.
 
Cough Drops-  What if your diabetic patient has a cold or the flu?
Hall's Cough Drops DO come in sugar free flavors such as Black Cherry & Mountain Menthol.
Not sure about cough syrup's though. I have not looked for any of those yet.
Check with your doctor about perscription sugar free cough syrups too.
The Chicken Soup items mentioned above will also come in handy.
 
Cola's- (Pop if your from the North)  Once again, Walmart's Diet Soda is a good choice for fixed income diabetic folks. You sure can't beat the price either. The two liter bottles are 2 for $1.00! Walmart also makes a "fizzy" flavored water that has no sugar or much of anything else, but really tastes good! Grape flavor is the favorite here and it is also very inexpensive too!
 
These have been "some" of my experiences shopping for and feeding of a diabetic person.
I still continue to search for items every time I go to the store and seem to find more and more items that are compatable to a diabetic's mealplan.
For me, shopping for and feeding a Diabetic/Chocoholic has been a real challenge to say the least, but it gets a little easier ever time I shop now.
With practice, you can do this too if you remember to do one thing:  CHECK THE LABELS!!!!.
 TMCD

Sigmoid Colostomy / Crohns / Type 1 Diabetic / Ostioarthritus / Fibromyalgia / Asthma / High Blood Pressure / High Colesterol / Migraines. Ain't life a joy?



* I think it may be time for a colorful metaphor*


spooky
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 101
   Posted 8/5/2006 8:47 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi there,
i read this post when this was posted and thanks to pin cushion for bringing it back.It's one heck of a post and my bump for it!

wmnak
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1123
   Posted 8/5/2006 12:57 PM (GMT -7)   

Great post - thanks for bumping it up for us newbies.

I'm using a lot of the products you mention: Hood milk, Smucker's s/f orange marmalade, R/Stover choc truffles, etc, etc.  Taking care of my high fiber colostomy needs, along with my diabetic diet, is somewhat of a challenge.  Check out the frozen dinners, too - some are surprisingly appropriate for us.

:-)   Martha

ilovecats94
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 190
   Posted 8/5/2006 3:48 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for that info, Pin Cushion. :-) I use the fat free Smart Beat Smart Squeeze as I have lactose intolerance.

Hugs,
Faye =^..^=
Hypothyroidism (1953), Diabetes type 2 (1976), High cholesterol (1989), Gastroparesis (1990), FMS (1995), and GERD (2006).


fergusc
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 230
   Posted 8/5/2006 3:59 PM (GMT -7)   
I've got to admit that's a strong contender for the biggest post of all time. I've also got to admit a lot of the logic escapes me!
Of course low sugar goes without saying but what about all the refined starch in these products? White bread, microwave rice, Cheerios, pancakes, cookies, popcorn? You may as well have the sugar for all the difference it'll make to your blood glucose levels.
And another thing - dietary fat is not the enemy for diabetics. Not only does it have a negligable effect on blood sugar, it also slows the absorbtion of sugars from other sources and needs to be retained as much as possible in a diabetic diet. A high cholestorol level also has very little to do with dietary fat - it's a by-product made by the liver in response to an excess of sugar and starch in the diet.
Less sugar and starch, more protein and fat is the recipe for normal blood sugars and good health.
 
fergusc

spooky
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 101
   Posted 8/6/2006 1:50 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi there,
one correction!One fraction of cholesterol"triglycerides"are influenced by the amount of fat,especially saturated fat in the food we eat.
My serum triglycerides used to be above normal(>150mgs%),until i started taking the intestinal fat absorption inhibitor"ORLISTAT".Now my triglycerides are hovering around 50 mgs%.

I do agree that the glycemic load of white bread is very high,but as the post said ,moderation is the key.
Same is the case with rice where the major portion converts to glucose,but not as fast or as high as white bread.In Asia where white rice is the staple meals,diabetics are advised to continue taking rice,but small portions.
Fat does convert to glucose!High fat in the diet may delay absorption of glucose,but consider the downside.More fat in the diet,more weight gain,more insulin resistance and ultimately poor control of blood glucose.No more than 20% of the diet should contain fat is a well accepted and adopted practice

Post Edited (spooky) : 8/6/2006 8:24:42 AM (GMT-6)


Lonna
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2006
Total Posts : 77
   Posted 8/6/2006 7:44 AM (GMT -7)   
OK you guys I knew the diet was very tricky but I didn't know just how confusing, difficult or specific it has to be. When and if I get a diagnosis I will take advantage of all the classes so I can get it right until then I'm eating my normal diet except just not eating anything with sugar. I had my last bowl of frosted shredded wheat for breakfast this morning. It's been very interesting and informative to read on this site. Thanks to all, Lonna
DX: lupus, headaches, hairloss, lipoatrophy, high blood pressure, allergies, chemical sensitivities, neuropathy in both hands and both feet
 
Meds: placquenil 200mg, prednisone 7mg, cozaar 100mg for high blood pressure, effexor 75mg antidepressant, trazodone 100mg & lunesta for sleep,vicodin for pain, imitrex nasal for migraines, nasonex and astelin for allergies.


fergusc
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 230
   Posted 8/6/2006 4:04 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi Spooky,

Great to have an informed debate on the subject of diet - let's keep it going!

I've been Type 1 for 25 years and my triglycerides and cholestrol levels also dropped significantly around 5 years ago. No meds required. Instead I changed from high carb, low fat to low carb with more fat and protein. Not only have I lost 4 stone in weight, but my bloods are so much better too. Cholestorol 5.1, HDL 3.0, LDL 1.8, triglycerides 0.6 (sorry, these are UK measurements and I don't know how they would convert into US figures). The factors which influence triglyceride levels are heredity, excercise levels, blood sugar levels, diet, ratio of abdominal fat to lean body mass and most especially recent consumption of carbohydrate. After a high carb meal, excess blood sugar is converted to fat with direct consequences on cholestorol levels.

Dietary fat can't be converted to blood sugar - it's a myth! My own experience has convinced me that the low fat approach is not only counterproductive, but actually harmful. Is it purely coincidental that the spectacular rise in diabetes and obesity levels coincides so closely with the rise of the low fat paradigm?


spooky
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 101
   Posted 8/6/2006 8:59 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi there Fergusc,

                      Let the dialogue continue!

                      If you notice,in my first sentence i mentioned "saturated"fat.I have nothing against mono and poly-unsaturated fats.In fact exchanging mono and the poly-unsaturated fats for carbohydrates reduces the "bad" cholesterol(LDL)and triglycerides and increases the "GOOD"cholesterol(HDL)

                     In epidemiological studies it was found that higher intake of saturated and "trans-fats" increases the risk of Coronary Heart Disease.Low fat,high carbohydrate diets can exacerbate diabetic dyslipidemias by RAISING triglycerides and LOWERING HDL.

                     I accept that diets rich in mono and poly-unsaturated fats are o.k,with the proviso that the total caloric intake is controlled!

                      Dietary cholesterol:Due to the abnormal cholesterol transport in diabetics due to decreased levels of apoE,higher intake of dietary cholesterol,for example egg yolk,has been proven to have detrimental effects on the serum cholesterol profile.There is also an association between high dietary cholesterol and hyperglycemia.It's universally recommended that foods rich in saturated fatty acids(EG:egg yolk) should be restricted in diabetics.

                     I mentioned Trans-fats being as bad as saturated fat.They are formed when vegetable oils are partially hardened by hydrogenation.Rich sources of trans-fats are stick margarine,commercially available baked products and MOST IMPORTANTLY DEEP-FRIED FAST FOODS TO WHICH THE BABY BOOMERS AND THE PRESENT GENERATION ARE SO USED TO CONSUMING.In the Nurse's Health Study intake of trans-fatty acids was positively associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes in a 14 year follow-up!Trans-fats also increase Triglycerides,LDL and reduce HDL.

                    In humans,there is little "de-novo"synthesis of fatty acids from glucose within the adipocytes and most of the triglycerides are derived from esterification of NEFA's(Non-Esterified Fatty Acids),ultimately derived mostly from the diet taken and a small portion via synthesis in the liver.THIS IS THE EXACT REASON WHY BLOOD CHOLESTEROL TESTS ARE DONE IN A TRUE FASTING STATE!


Claire-Bear
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 242
   Posted 8/7/2006 6:20 AM (GMT -7)   
Also, this post is probably aimed at type 2s more than type 1s - as a type 1 my diet should be the same as a normal, healthy diet.  Everything is allowed but in moderation.  So, we are allowed fatty foods, sweet foods etc but in MODERATION.  I'm not so sure about type 2s but us type 1s have more freedom.  If we decide to have more carbs than normal (i.e. a dessert after a meal) then we can have some extra insulin to cover it.  The things to avoid are sugary drinks (unless, of course you're having a hypo) and things that raise your blood sugar really quickly (please look up glycemic index on the net).  I had marmalade (normal, not low sugar) on wholegrain toast this morning, for instance, and my blood sugar levels were fine.  It's just about finding a balance.
 
Claire x

spooky
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 101
   Posted 8/7/2006 7:30 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi there claire,

The effect of saturated fats and trans-fats in the diet are the same for all of us,because of the abnormal cholesterol transport and the deleterious effect, dyslipidemia has, on our heart,brain and the peripheral nerves.The difference is you use rapid acting insulins,especially the analogues which start their action within 10 minutes of s/c injection,so you can play around with the dose;Even that is dangerous as you have to accurately match the carb load and the insulin dosage!Possibly,you have more experience than us type 2's

Claire-Bear
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 242
   Posted 8/7/2006 7:52 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi Spooky,

You're probably right there, but I was just commenting on the very first post of this thread.  The very first post says things like not to even have potato chips etc, which I don't personally agree with for type 1s.  I've been diabetic for close on to 15 years, have eaten a pretty 'normal' diet and have no complications that I'm aware of.  I've had a few scares with the insulin (i.e. once or twice accidentally giving myself too much) but it's all through trial and error that we learn how much insulin we should be giving ourselves.  It's not so dangerous as you'd expect by giving yourself 1 or 2 units too much insulin - as long as you are still getting symptoms of hypos and keeping a close eye on things.  Part of having these quick acting insulins is to give us diabetics a bit more freedom with our food and eating.  I hope it doesn't sound like I'm having a go at you or anything, but I seriously think that t1s at least have a lot more freedom with food than this post implies. 

Claire xx


Lonna
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2006
Total Posts : 77
   Posted 8/8/2006 7:25 AM (GMT -7)   
I'll admit I was shocked as to the strictness of the diet mentioned in the first post as my experience is with my adult daughter who has type 1 and an insulin pump. She is a healthy eater but can and does eat everything including birthday cake and frosting on occasion. I've been happy for her that her diet doesn't seem that restrictive. At my age if I am found to have diabetes it will probably be type 2 and that scares me. Lonna
DX: lupus, headaches, hairloss, lipoatrophy, high blood pressure, allergies, chemical sensitivities, neuropathy in both hands and both feet
 
Meds: placquenil 200mg, prednisone 7mg, cozaar 100mg for high blood pressure, effexor 75mg antidepressant, trazodone 100mg & lunesta for sleep,vicodin for pain, imitrex nasal for migraines, nasonex and astelin for allergies.


fergusc
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 230
   Posted 8/8/2006 4:20 PM (GMT -7)   

Hello again Spooky,

I agree with you 100% on the subject of trans-fats. They have no dietary benefit whatsoever and the research I have read suggests our bodies have no way of dealing with them effectively. They're highly beneficial to the profit margins of processed food manufacturers of course. Call me a cynic. I've made a habit of ensuring none of that stuff gets into my shopping trolley.

I don't think research supports a mistrust of saturated fat however. I know we diabetics have been conditioned to fear it but really, where's the evidence? My lipid profiles have improved immensely with an increased use of bacon, butter, cream and cheese. Woohoo! My conclusion is that high lipid profiles are a syptom of high blood sugars, not excess dietary fat.

Now, I also try to exercise quite a bit - I completed the Edinburgh Marathon back in June this year. Some have told me this is skewing my results but then I also exercised back when my lipids weren't good. The difference? - I've cut back on the carbs, my blood sugars are near normal and my lipids have followed suit.

Anyhow, I'm delighted we can have an informed debate about it. Blood tests coming up for me later this week and I'll keep you posted.

fergusc


spooky
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 101
   Posted 8/8/2006 9:43 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi there,

             evidence regarding saturated fats and TRANS-fats in the diet come from the nurses health study.The conclusion of the study states that saturated fats in the diet increase coronary heart disease,though the focus is more on trans-fats.

            The following para,i teased out from an article from the Harvard school of public health:

Saturated fats are mainly animal fats. They are found in meat, seafood, whole-milk dairy products (cheese, milk, and ice cream), poultry skin, and egg yolks. Some plant foods are also high in saturated fats, including coconut and coconut oil, palm oil, and palm kernel oil. Saturated fats raise total blood cholesterol levels more than dietary cholesterol because they tend to boost both good HDL and bad LDL cholesterol. The net effect is negative, meaning it's important to limit saturated fats.


fergusc
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 230
   Posted 8/9/2006 4:49 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi Spooky,

All interesting stuff, but still far from conclusive.

The conventional wisdom that dietary fat should be strictly limited is in fact relatively recent. I understand that the average American diet around 30 years ago derived around 40% of total calories from fat. Not something you would expect to see recommended these days and yet the reduction in fat from the diet in the intervening years apparently mirrors the increase in obesity and diabetes.

Gary Taubes wrote an article on the subject in Science dated March 30 2001 which is well worth reading.

He produced a graph which still sticks in my memory today. It illustrated a 25% reduction in dietary calories consumed as fat between 1960 and 1990 which directly correlated to the number of overweight Americans increasing by almost 50%. Clearly there are also other issues at work here, but the demonising of dietary fat seems a little illogical.

I like Dr Bernstein's take on the issue. "The fallacy that eating fat will make you fat is about as scientifically logical as saying that eating tomatoes will turn you red."

I wonder how many members of the forum are pursuing a low-fat strategy?

fergusc


spooky
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 101
   Posted 8/9/2006 11:23 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi there Fergusc,

                       let me try this tack!Weight loss or gain depends on the total calorie intake and expenditure.Those people who maintain a negative balance over a period of time lose weight.Gram for gram, fat in the diet contains twice as many calories as carb's or protein;Hence restricting the intake of fat is beneficial.Iam sending you an article below.please go through it.

http://health.msn.com/dietfitness/articlepage.aspx?cp-documentid=100125401

This comes from Mayo clinic,Rochester.Don't discount it!

                       One wise man said"all conversation is violence,as all the time you are trying to forcibly convert the other to your point of view"!How correct!


Claire-Bear
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 242
   Posted 8/10/2006 1:24 AM (GMT -7)   

I have to say I think you are both right here and have good points.  

The percentage of the average Ameican's diet being made up of fat has fallen, but the portion sizes have gone up considerably in the past few years, so you can probably say the amount of fat eaten has gone up even though percentage wise it's gone down - you have to be careful when reading statistics.  The average person no longer eats an appropriate portion size now.  It's true to say that British friends who have visited the US were gobsmacked at how huge the portions are over there (and even here they are usually too big).  So, again I say that balance is the key.  Anything in excess is bad for you, and we all need some fat in our diets.   So, I think you should both settle that you both have great points and that you can never make someone totally agree with you (world would be boring if we could).  I think there are too many factors in the food we eat to totally blame illnesses on the fat we eat.  A lot of meat, for example, contains hormones etc and that can't be helping our health for a start! 

Claire xx


fergusc
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 230
   Posted 8/10/2006 3:49 PM (GMT -7)   

Thanks for the link Spooky. I'm always interested to read the wide range of opinions on the subject.

I'd hate to reinforce the stereotype of a miserably fatty Scottish diet because times have changed here. And you're right of course Claire, moderation in all things. Personally my diet is mostly low gi vegetables with protein and fat to keep them company. Seems to work pretty well for me. I had my blood tests today and my consultant tells me the lipid profiles and hbA1c are better than any of the non-diabetic staff there!

My point was that I was finding it hard to grasp the logic of a diabetic diet that contained a lot of starchy food and strictly limited dietary fat when the starch sends blood glucose skyward and the fat doesn't. Its normal blood sugars we all aspire to after all. Each to their own though.

fergusc


Claire-Bear
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 242
   Posted 8/11/2006 3:06 AM (GMT -7)   

Fergusc,

You have a point there - also, lower carb means (for type 1 at least) lower insulin doses and therefore less of a chance of having a hypo.  I think this is all Dr Bernstein stuff, but I'm not sure just how reliable his work is.

I found that lately I've reduced the amounts of carb I have with meals as a whole, so have replaced about 50% of the carbs on my plate for veg and salad and this seems to be helping to stablise my blood sugars more.  Slowly but surely levels are all coming down. 

There's a good argument to say that diabetics should keep their carb intake limited...


fergusc
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 230
   Posted 8/11/2006 1:54 PM (GMT -7)   

Claire,

Glad you're having some success with this approach too.

I stumbled across the Bernstein stuff a couple of years ago, some time after I'd stumbled across the low carb approach myself by trial, error and a fair bit of research. I found his book very reassuring in the face of a great deal of scepticism from the so called experts pedalling the established starchy carbohydrate paradigm.

The logic is pretty compelling I think. Low carb for me has resulted in lower insulin doses, lower weight, lower lipids, lower blood sugars. None of these things had been possible before with a low fat regimen. To be honest, I don't know why there hasn't been a more widespread conversion yet, but perhaps in time...

fergusc x


Phishbowl
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 547
   Posted 8/14/2006 4:16 PM (GMT -7)   
G'Day All,
Just have to say that I'm glad for this kind of opinion-sharing on the subject of foods. You all bring up some great points and I appreciate that no one is trying to convince anyone of their own stance but rather, openly sharing opinion and experience. Love it ! :-)

I personally don't believe in any one diet but rather in the approach that: everything in moderation (the key being understanding what constitutes moderation), eating foods in their original state as much as possible and avoiding the prepackaged food isles, cook using methods like steaming, broiling, grilling, and roasting, including as many varied fresh vegetables as possible, avoiding anything that says 'low carb', 'low cholesterol', 'no sugar added', etc. (sorry - just not convinced that 10 ingredients to replace one natural one is healthier), and choose rather those products that have as few ingredients listed as possible and ones I can actually pronounce. I'd rather have a bit of real cream and sugar ice cream than a low-calorie/low fat one with propalyne glycol, and 15 other ingredients I can't pronounce (or spell :-)

I do things like, instead of jam, I'll take 2 strawberries and smash 'em flat with a fork and put 'em on my whole grain toast with natural PB (just peanuts-no oil, no salt, no sugar). I don't drink so, I marinade things in red wine, mustard and herbs and such instead of using sauces. I eat chocolate occasionally, but always dark and always in small amounts after a well-balanced meal. I deprive myself of nothing but I'm careful and conscientious with how I go about it.

Hope the discussion continues.....
Cheers,
- Phishbowl (Type 1 since Jan'05 - Levemir, NovoRapid)

"What's Not Measured Is Not Managed"


spooky
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 101
   Posted 8/14/2006 6:06 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi there,

               The Nurses Health Study is a landmark trial.More than 80,000 nurses were studied over a period of 14 years.The conclusion was that for every 5% increase in dietary fat,there was a corresponding 17% increase in risk of coronary heart disease.To date this is the largest trial showing this relationship.Please see this link :http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/short/337/21/1491 


Claire-Bear
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 242
   Posted 8/15/2006 1:16 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi Phishbowl,

I totally agree with you there about the natural ingredients - we diabetics often get so many sugar substitutes but I've been reading up recently about them and they seem to be quite harmful and also do affect blood sugar levels anyway!  I like the idea about just squishing some fruit rather than using jam...yum! 

Spooky, thanks for the link - I have to admit I haven't properly read it yet, but I'm presuming it's about dietry fats such as those derived from animals rather than those like olive oil?  I think that mediterranean diets for instance, with high levels of olive and fish oils, are very healthy though.  It's scary to think that only a small percentage rise in dietry fat can cause such significantly larger percentage rise in risk of coronary illness!

But there is this quote from the link though...

Conclusions Our findings suggest that replacing saturated and trans unsaturated fats with unhydrogenated monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats is more effective in preventing coronary heart disease in women than reducing overall fat intake.

Claire x


spooky
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 101
   Posted 8/15/2006 6:02 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi there Claire-Bear,

                              I should have mentioned that for every 5% increase in intake of"SATURATED"fat,the CAD risk increases by 17%.

                              There is no controversy regarding mono-and poly unsaturated fats in the diet being beneficial!

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
40 posts in this thread.
Viewing Page :
 1  2 
Forum Information
Currently it is Friday, December 02, 2016 11:06 AM (GMT -7)
There are a total of 2,731,689 posts in 300,951 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 151123 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, Joyce Apuzzo.
310 Guest(s), 14 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
Purple Tulip, tennisplayer, Utah1981, mtm3461, Scaredy Cat, Girlie, Starlight*, maria2016, ChickenArise, Traveler, Bik31, straydog, Graytech, iPoop


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2016 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer