A Cause of Diabetes???

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kim123
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1201
   Posted 8/16/2006 6:34 PM (GMT -7)   
Hello,
I am a user in the UC forum. Happened to see a TV health show today that mentioned a scientific report coming out that suggests that that diabetes has an "infectious" cause. I think it is in  "Medical News Today", July 17, 2006. Anyway,I am interested in all new research as I have been trying for 13 years to get well from UC. Then I came across this website of an interview with a researcher who has found the same conclusion. I am only posting it here for your perusal. I mean nothing by it, take it as you will. I myself like to be informed before I form any opinions. Forgive me if I overstepped my boundaries. Just thought it was thought provoking.
 
 
Best to all,
Kim

spooky
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 101
   Posted 8/16/2006 10:07 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi there,

           I have posted a topic with the heading"gene variant-a powerful predictor of type 2 diabetes".Please look it up.

 

           I also would request you to read about a trial concluded in 2001 called the"Diabetes Prevention Program(DPP)"where it was shown that life-style modification and Metformin prevented or delayed the risk of developing type 2 Diabetes by upto 58%.The study was stopped one year ahead of schedule due to the overwhelming evidence.

 

          After the genome mapping program ended recently,mutations in many candidate genes were identified to cause diabetes.The classical case in point is the MODY(Maturity Onset Diabetes in the Young).

 

           In situations where a single etiological factor cannot be identified as causative,hypotheses and theories rush in to fill the gap,as in the case like diabetes.

 

           Evidence in the form of a double blind,cross over trial in enough subjects is essential to prove or disprove the "fungal etiology"of type 2 diabetes.Until then it is hard to accept the fungal theory.


jccglutenfree
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 8/16/2006 10:20 PM (GMT -7)   
Have you heard about the role gluten/casein sensitivity may play in type 1 diabetes? The research is early, but check it out!

http://jccglutenfree.googlepages.com/diabetes


Hope some may find this interesting!

Cara

kim123
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1201
   Posted 8/17/2006 3:31 AM (GMT -7)   
A couple of thiings I thought about as I read the above mentioned googlepages links...First, it is interesting that one has to inject mice with something (e. grains) to bring the onset of diabetes, thereby infering that diabetes is not necessarily "genetic"? They aren't "born" with it, it was brought on by something they ate...and also, it is interesting to note that mice fed a "wheat containing" diet had a higher incidence of diabetes. As the JAMA (Journal of American Medicine) Jan. 2002, has indicated that grains are commonly contaminated with mold(fungus), I wonder if it is this that actually triggers the diabetes, instead of the "gluten". I feel more research should be done in this field before making conclusive findings. Here's to more research :)

jccglutenfree
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 8/17/2006 7:42 AM (GMT -7)   

Yes, the research is early, but moving rapidly. They start with animals, but are moving on to humans.  Both genetic predisposition and enviromental influences (in this case, gluten/casein)play a role. Celiac Disease, the only autoimmune disease with a KNOWN cause (dietary gluten (wheat, rye, barley), carries a very strong genetic predisposition. 95% of all celiacs have one of two genetic types, but it takes ingestion of dietary gluten to set the disease in motion. And while 30% of the population has the genetic predisposition, only 1% of the population has Celiac Disease, although estimates of gluten sensitivity are suspected to be as high as 30% by some researchers.

Did you see the information on zonulin, a regulator of the intestinal and blood/brain barrier? People with celiac disease, MS, and diabetes have higher than normal levels of zonulin, and gluten ingestion does seem to trigger higher production of zonulin in some people. 

There is a zonulin blocking drug in clinical phases, being fast tracked. IF there is a drug to be developed, the research moves quickly! If the research is limited to dietary changes, it doesn't move as quickly...although there was a clinical trial for removing casein from the diets of children predisposed to type 1 diabetes. It is very difficult to have controlled studies involving dietary regulation because it is almost impossible to monitor compliance (and funding is limited if there isn't a potential drug to be developed). However, there are many studies which show gluten (and casein (milk) sensitivity) in those with autoimmune disease. Association does not prove cause...but the research keeps moving forward. Much more research on gluten than casein.

Anyway, there is a huge amount of research looking this direction~ with intestinal permeability setting the stage for the development of food sensitivity, and when those food proteins escape the gut...they trigger 'autoimmune' diseases such as diabetes, MS, gluten ataxia, and others. Again, this is PROVEN in Celiac Disease, and they are just starting to question whether food sensitivity might play a role in other autoimmune disease.  I have been following this research for the past five years since finding my daughters are gluten sensitive. We have a family history of lots of autoimmune thyroid disease, and my father is insulin dependent diabetic.  I never would have guessed that food sensitivity might be the culprit, but the evidence keeps coming in.

On zonulin and diabetes~

http://www.celiac.com/st_prod.html?p_prodid=1120&p_catid=&p_print=y&sid=91hH9H1V02fM9PL-38106403124.68

 

 
While there are no reports of Type 1 Diabetes reversing on a gluten free diet, there are some  reports of other autoimmune disease improving on a gluten free diet (sometimes casein free, too). 

However, in some cases, the damage is done and cannot be reversed. This seems to be the case for Diabetes. Time will tell if the zonulin blocker can actually prevent diabetes if at risk patients are identified before it is too late.

Food for thought!

Cara


Post Edited (jccglutenfree) : 8/24/2006 1:55:43 PM (GMT-6)


kim123
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1201
   Posted 8/18/2006 8:00 AM (GMT -7)   
Cara, Thank you for the above info. Very interesting. Not having diabetes, or having it in my family, it is great to learn new things. What would you say is the biggest change one can make to their lifestyle to reduce the chances of getting diabetes, or what would be the best change for a person to do that is diagnosed with diabetes? Once you are diagnosed, can you do something to reduce/eliminate your symptoms (ie.high blood sugar)? Should you eliminate certain foods? Just wondering. I always like to learn new information.
Kim

jccglutenfree
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 8/18/2006 9:05 AM (GMT -7)   
Kim,

I don't have diabetes, either, although my father does have insulin dependent diabetes. This info sort of came my way through the door with the discovery that my daughters had gluten sensitivity...and a whole big new world opened up with the many things that are associated. I've learned many things over my past six years in the "medical underground" business that don't particularly pertain to me...and I pass them along to people who may be interested....including those lurkers who read but never seem to post.

In a nutshell, for anyone who has any autoimmune disease history in their family, they might want to pay attention to the research in this area. While celiac disease is the only autoimmune disease with a known trigger/cause (ingestion of wheat, rye, barley- gluten)...newer research is beginning to suggest that this leaky gut/ food sensitivity may play a role (or partial role) in other autoimmune disease including Type 1 diabetes, MS, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, autoimmune liver disease, and more.

But...this really is ground breaking...I've been watching it unfold for six years already...and it may take years more to hit "the field" unless the miracle drug really proves to halt the process of developing diabetes and possibly other autoimmune disease. Then it will be huge news FAST.

So...people need to pay attention to family history, because even though our doctors always ask, they might not always pay attention and follow through.

For example, my family history is loaded with autoimmune disease and I had a B12 deficiency, yet when my daughter presented with seizures...neither autoimmune mechanism or nutritional deficiency were considered (even after I specifically asked!). I had to search all this out myself (with great Internet acquaintences helping me), but I found answers for my entire family...and they all came back to diet and nutrition.

If someone has a strong family history of autoimmune disease...especially, but not only if they have any GI problems, they may want to be tested for gluten (and casein sensitivity), and other foods. If food sensitivity shows, they may want to remove those foods from their diet. Not many of our doctors think preventatively, but those who do would recommend this prevenative course of action.

In terms of type 2 diabetes, others are probably better able to answer, although I can share my husband's experience. My husband has had type 2 diabetes for about five years. I urged him to see a doctor when the rest of my family were uncovering our health problems...I wanted him tested for thyroid disease (his mom has), diabetes (his dad had), and gluten sensitivity (our daughters had). Of these things, only the diabetes showed up. BUT...he discovered it early because he was tested early because he asked to be because of family history!! He has been able to keep it under control with weight control and exercise, although exercise seems to be the biggest factor for him. Even when his weight is a little high (20-40 lbs over ideal..'ideal' being unrealistic), if he swims two to three times a week...his blood sugar stays under control. He falls off the exercise wagon sometimes for a few months, but always gets back on. He has also used recommended supplements, like Diachrome  (although this blend can be had cheaper by buying them as separate supplements).  He has avoided prescription drugs thus far. While I am not against all prescription medication (as some are truly necessary and life saving), my personal helath philosophy is to always try lifestyle changes first, including a sensible diet, sensible nutritional supplements (vitamins/minerals) known to be beneficial, and exercise.

The book Reversing Diabetes by Julian Whitaker, MD, was recommended to us, and although I have not read it, my husband did. I would also recommend people read and learn both mainstream and alternative approaches in respect to their diseases. There is tons of information out there on the subject, but I am not personally well read on this subject. My subject is gluten :). Read everything with an open but sensible mind. When I say alternative, I don't mean anything crazy..but I do mean reading about nutritional supplements that may be useful. And of course, always let your doctor know what you are up to...

The SINGLE most important thing someone can do is to be informed....do their own homework... be an active participant in their health. I'm sure this isn't big news, but many people are content to take direction only from their doctors...and there is so much they aren't telling us!

Cara
Hi Cara. Sorry I had to remove the one link in your post as it went to a website that was selling the supplement.

Post Edited (jccglutenfree) : 8/24/2006 1:56:28 PM (GMT-6)


kim123
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1201
   Posted 8/18/2006 9:20 AM (GMT -7)   

Cara,

Thank you for so much for all your information. I am totally on your page. I have been fighting UC for 13 years and all my doctors told me that choice of foods (diet) had no influence on my disease. Oh, how they were wrong, for me anyway. I started doing my own research. My doctors didn't ever give me nutritional advise, even when I asked (I don't think they are allowed?), and they never gave me an "exit strategy" with all the drugs I was taking. So, I decided to do some research myself. I started avoiding fungal feeding foods (yeast, sugars, peanuts/cheese (both mold foods), and limited grains and milk, and now I am symptom free and drug free. You sound like my kind of lady with your philosophy on it all. Wish we could sit down together and chat some more! Take care...

Kim :)


jccglutenfree
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 8/18/2006 10:01 AM (GMT -7)   
 
Kim,
I am so happy to hear you have also found a path to better health! I had just put two and two together... that UC in your first post stood for ulcerative colitis. I was debating about whether to post back and ask whether you have tried the Specific Carbohydrate Diet..but I see you have already found your path to better health! 
Does it make you crazy, too, when people call diet and nutrition 'alternative' treatment and the doctors who promote it to be practicing 'alternative medicine'?
Be well!
Cara
 
 

Post Edited (jccglutenfree) : 8/18/2006 11:16:29 AM (GMT-6)


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 8/21/2006 7:59 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for posting this. It helps some peeps to think outside of the "doctor should make me better" box. The sooner we take responsibility for being partners in our own health care the better the job our doctors can do.

Something that may help you understand your doctor's hesitation in the nutrition area is that they spend relatively little time in med school on nutrition, leaving that to nutritionists who specialize in that area. They concentrate on diagnosis, etiology and treatment of disease mechanisms through deductive reasoning and experience. Because they often are called in after the fact for illness and disease they have little chance to support pro-active health issues in their patients. This is actually our responsibility, although most people don't see it that way.

It's kind of like checking your oil in your car. If you never check your oil between oil changes, or neglect to get your oil changed at least every 4000 miles you are asking for trouble. If you develop an oil leak (that you don't notice in your driveway) and ignore the dash light or guage that's telling you there's a problem you can blow a rod and total an engine! (speaking from experience here tongue) The mechanic was very understanding and helpful (as he sold me a $2600 replacement engine) but even then he didn't mention to me that checking my oil would be a good idea. He fixes things... he expected me to take care of the everyday maintenance.... DUH! (I'm so dumb!)

Now I check my sugars and my oil. :-) Just taking care of business.
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


kim123
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1201
   Posted 8/21/2006 9:12 AM (GMT -7)   
...Nicely said! :)
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