Recently diagnosed type 2, and really confused.

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gemstar
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 6
   Posted 10/11/2006 3:22 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi there,
 
I'm 33 and overweight and have recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.  I've kinda lived with diabetes in the background all my life, my gran was extremely overweight and died of diabetes related illnesses.  Even though the desease was always about i have no idea how to deal with it myself.
I've had my initial appointment with the doc and he's now put me on a diet and i was due to go back for my A1c, but i got scared after i cheated on my diet quite abit, so have been putting it off.  I got given a few booklets but alot of the information seems to contradict itself.  I've been told to eat a carb based diet with hardly any sugar, but then i read on a web site to avoid things like white rice and bread.  But thats about all i've been eating.  I did lose over half a stone straight away because i was scared, but i seem to have got stuck in a rut again.  I've started to feel really moody, i just hope my marriage survives.  I constantly snap at my husband and when i'm not biting his head off i'm sobbing.  Is this part of diabetes?? or am i just a moody cow???
I went to a party a couple of weeks ago and all i had was a jacket potato, some corn and a roll, i only had 1 glass of red wine then later that night i took my blood sugar level and it was 11, Is this really bad????? i can't understand why it was so high when i had had hardly any sugar.  How much fruit can i eat??? some people have told me to limit my citrus fruit, is this true??? Can i eat bananas??? Are pins and needles a side effect???  Any advice anyone can give me would be great xx

I_willconquer
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 77
   Posted 10/11/2006 5:59 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi thre. Sorry about your diagnosis. My 3yro has type 1, and it can affect your mood...especially if you are too high or too low. It's going to take time to see what diet works for you best, and I dont mean diet in a sense of deprivation but of an overall healthy lifestyle change. Excercising regularly really helps stabalize blood sugars, so if you are able I'd implement an excercise program as well When my son was first dx the dr's were suggesting all these sugar free foods, told us not to give him more than x amt of carbs. When we saw an endocrinologist, she lasughed at the info we received. She told us he is a growing boy and that we should NOT restrict him, but give everything in moderation, and according to his numbers. Sometimes these general dr's and nurses don't really know the ins and outs of this disease, that's why it's important to see an endo bc they have all the up to date info.

Please don't let this disease get you in the dumps, there's been so many improvements,new meds etc, and if you take care of yourself you can live a long life without diabetes related complications.
Be blessed, I just said a prayer for you.

gemstar
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 6
   Posted 10/11/2006 6:52 AM (GMT -7)   
Thankyou very much, I'm so happy to have found this forum. I've found lots of websites with differing advice and you never know whether to follow it or not. It really helps chatting with people that have first hand experience with diabetes. I need to motivate myself again and get back into the excercise, started out so well but just seem to be up and down all the time. I think its a case of still believing its not really happening to me and anyway its not that serious, reading what other people write kinda opens your eyes. I need to start taking it seriously before my health suffers anymore. once again thanx, your son is in my thoughts x

Warren
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Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 10/11/2006 7:35 AM (GMT -7)   

Ok, Im gonna weigh in on this with a different point of view.  First off 11 (198mg/dl) is just plain too high. It was caused mostly by the stuff you ate when you were out.  ANYTHING white is going to create sugar in your system and maybe even hit your bloodstream faster than table sugar.  White bread, "jacket potatoes", rice, etc. all fall into this category!  CORN and corn starch and high fructose corn syrup will convert directly to sugar in your system and are generally no-no's. If you are indeed a type 2 (and with a reading like "11" it sounds like it) red wine is off your list!  In the simplest terms, the liver is responsible for releasing sugar into your blood stream and you are screwing around with it when you drink.  Also the first drugs that the doctor puts you on for diabetes will directly affect your liver so you definately don't want to burden your liver with alcohol.

You don't have to give up tons of foods but you definately have to go to a nutritionist as what you are doing now is only going to make your disease worse and put you on the slippery slope of taking more meds to bring your numbers down to accomodate a lifestyle you should have changed!!!

Lastly, swings in your blood sugar will DEFINATELY affect your moods.  When my blood sugar was like yours I used to be very snappy and people would have to walk on eggshells around me.  As you get your blood sugar under control, you will find that the mood swings should abate.  Now for the part you don't want to hear.  You really have to test your blood at least once every morning when you get up and preferably one more time during the day 2-3 hours after you eat.  These numbers will show you and your doctor whether your meds are doing what they are supposed to.  IF YOUR NUMBERS don't come into the range that is safe for you, your doctor needs to give you higher doses or combinations of meds.  The whole idea is to get you to a normal blood sugar state and ensure that you are going to live to an old age!

Didn't mean to lecture, but if you don't start to do something RIGHT NOW about your condition, by the time something like advanced neuropathy or heart disease kicks in; 20/20 hindsight isn't going to do you much good. 

scool  Warren

PS: There is a ton of nutrition advice on this board, you are just going to have to read back through the diabetes posts to find some of it.


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 10/11/2006 2:48 PM (GMT -7)   
Gemstar,
I started out like you and was afraid to take my blood sugar readings because they would be bad... I wish I could just hop over the ocean and give you a big hug... It's going to be ok. You are going through the beginning part of accepting your diabetes... It's not easy to admit you have a bad disease and it can make you angry and sad all at the same time. Please excuse my buddy, Warren. He is very knowledgable and hates to see people suffer with this disease. He wants you to become healthy right away.

Let's start with the doctor... He gave you a certain diet to follow, right? (I like to call it a LIVE-IT not a diet.) Did he send you to a nutritonist? That would be the best thing he could do for you. Do they have food classes for diabetics where you live? If not you will need to get some good books about foods and I would ask the Doctor's nurse to recommend some. Do you know anyone from your church or neighborhood or work who is diabetic? Ask around and find out where they got their diabetic teaching.

What makes understanding diabetes and foods difficult is that your body only sees three things, protein, fat and carbohydrate. (Aside from vitamins and minerals.) I was shocked to learn that if a food isn't a protein (meat, fish, eggs, cheese) or a fat (olive oil, butter, meat fats, many nuts) it is a carbohydrate. Bread is a carbohydrate and so is candy, but milk is considered a carbohydrate as well. It has fat and protein but for us diabetics one of the big concerns in the lactose or milk sugar in it which is a carbohydrate. In most cases plant foods have carbs in them. Brocolli has some carbs in it, but they are locked inside the little plant cells so your body can't get to them right away. This makes brocolli a good carb. Lots of vitamins, fiber and slow, time-released carbs to keep your blood sugars level. Pasta, which is made from wheat, has been processed to the point that the carbohydrates in it have been released from the plant cells, and sort of put together in a way that our body has no problem absorbing the starch from it very quickly. This is what makes pasta, rice, corn and other cereal based foods difficult for diabetics to use. We get too much carbohydrate at one time and our sugar goes up. If we have fat mixed with the carb it will slow it's absorption time, as will protein.


Also, let's get some things understood. You may still have some of your favorite foods every so often. I still have a bit of ice cream or chocolate when I absolutely must have them, I just skip eating my potato or bread at dinner to make the difference. You will learn to correct your foods so that you stay in your safety zone for your blood sugar.

Right now you have a lot of fear and confusion. With your next meal, eat what you are supposed to eat and when you are finished clean up the kitchen. Use a small plate at the table and leave the table when you are finished eating. If your family socializes at the dinner table and you want to be part of that after the meal then start some knitting or needlepoint to do at the table while they finish eating. You certainly wouldn't want to get food all over a nice project.

If you have some hunger, it's normal in the beginning because your body is out to get all the sugar and carbs it can in case there might be a famine soon... WE know there won't be a famine, but out bodies don't. Some people find that drinking lots of tea or water or diet soda helps in the beginning with the hunger stuff. It only takes a few weeks for your body to adjust to the new way of eating. As soon as you do this you will find that your energy levels will improve and your sugars will as well.

Keep coming back here and we will all pitch in and help you. All of us Type2's have been where you are and we know exactly how scary and confusing this is. You will do fine if you take it one meal at a time. Hang in there girlfriend!
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 10/12/2006 9:36 AM (GMT -7)   

Gemstar,Please go and get your A1c checked. The A1c tells you how well-controlled your blood sugar has been over the last 3 months, so the fact that you've been eating poorly for a week or so won't affect it too much- neither will eating the perfect number of carbs! It will give you and your doctor a good reference for tailoring your treatment and give you a goal to shoot for. With diabetes, ignorance is not bliss, it's an invitation to complications that you don't want!

It's important to test your blood sugar right before you eat and 2 hours after to give you an idea of how certain foods affect you. There are many online sites that talk about the glycemic index and how to use it to help manage your food so that you don't get wild swings. The others have given you excellent advice about how different foods can affect you, and why. Everybody is different, so you may find that you can eat certain foods and not others- but you'll only know for sure if you test. You may find that you can eat potatoes if you have them with meat and broccoli, but not if you eat them alone or have bread at the same meal. You may find that even though a portion of some carb may be 1/2 cup, you can only eat 1/3 cup or your BG shoots up, or even worse, doesn't come down after a reasonable amount of time!  I have found that I cannot eat white potatoes- period. They just send me through the roof- but I can eat corn, corn -on-the-cob, corn pudding, scalloped corn, corn salsa- the list goes on (too bad I don't like corn eyes ). But I do love chocolate and I have one 60 calorie, 5 g carb piece of deep, dark excellent chocolate EVERY SINGLE DAY! (Fortunately, I have the lipid profile of a newborn baby, so my doctor encourages this vice - to keep me on the straight and narrow - and away from those potatoes!). Soon, you'll know so much more about yourself and how your body works. Every day is a new opportunity to manage your diabetes and improve your lifestyle so you can enjoy a long and happy complication-free life! sandy


I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett

Post Edited (gelchick) : 10/12/2006 10:38:37 AM (GMT-6)


gemstar
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 6
   Posted 10/12/2006 1:46 PM (GMT -7)   
Thank you Warren and Thank you Jeannie, I must admit to feeling very told off and upset after reading warrens reply and as is usual when i feel like that i sit down and have a good cry. After re reading it this morning i understand everything he says is right and for my benefit, doesn't make it any easier to take in though, but hey thanks anyway. Probably the boot up the bottom i needed.

Jeanie, in answer to some of your question. My mums boyfriend is diabetic, but not a very good role model and to be honest we don't really see eye to eye. He spends his evenings in the pub. I've had an appointment with my nurse who basically gave me a leaflet and told me to stick to carbs and cut out most of my sugar intake. I don't know whether things are different here than in the states because i haven't heard of diabetes clubs or classes. I shall look into it. Basically i got given a nutrition leaflet off my doc which lists foods to eat and avoid. But alot of the foods on the list are what people are now telling me are bad. Before i was diagnosed, i was quite a heavy drinker, probably more of a binge drinker. We are very social people and spend most weekend evenings out with freinds for dinner and it was always the norm to drink lots of red wine. I told my doctor about this and he just told me to cut down on my intake and probably limit myself to a couple of glasses at the most with my dinner. I can see now from reading back over previous threads that alcohol is not a good thing for a diabetic, it just wasn't really expressed in that way to me at my gp's.

I can honestly say since i signed up to this forum, my diet has completely changed, its only been 3 days but its a start. But gosh i'm really missing bread!!!!

I seem to be rabbiting on, so i shall sign off. Once again thank you to you both x

gemstar
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 6
   Posted 10/12/2006 1:53 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi gelchick, Thanks for that. I shall make sure i book back into the docs next week. It was slightly more than a week of going off the rails though, but i realise now putting it off just isn't doing me any favours. I'm just finding it really confusing, and i haven't got a clue half the time about what your all talking about. But with time i'm sure it'll start to sink in... fingers crossed. xx

UK Lyme Suffera
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 54
   Posted 10/12/2006 5:12 PM (GMT -7)   
I have removed this post because it has a commercial link, is full of misinformation and offers no support.

The purpose of this forum is to offer support and to educate. This is not an open debate about causes and cures of medically documented diseases, nor are we here to evaluate the 'drug companies' conspiracy' theory.

If you have any questions about this please email me at


jeannie143 at gmail dot com

Post Edited By Moderator (Jeannie143) : 10/14/2006 1:03:53 PM (GMT-6)


eljay1066
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2003
Total Posts : 3166
   Posted 10/12/2006 6:52 PM (GMT -7)   
Lyme, do you have diabetes? Could you share something about your own experiences? What supplements are you taking? How are your blood tests? What kind of diet do you follow? None of us here are doctors; we just share our own experiences; so I'm wondering about yours.
Take care. Lois




http://www.geocities.com/eljay1066/Aunt_Babe_s_House.html


wmnak
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1123
   Posted 10/13/2006 6:54 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi, Gemstar, and Welcome!

Managing diabetes is all about NUMBERS .. a numbers game that will determine your total health and wellbeing; and deserves your full attention.  From the daily self checks to monitoring the A1c to checking lab work for lipids - your numbers will tell you where you are, what you need to do (or avoid) and tack your progress.  Stepping onto those bathroom scales will give you yet another number that is useful to check your progress.

AnyThing that helps bring your numbers into line is useful - medication, diet, exercise, relaxation, meditation, supplements - whatever it takes!   It's all about your Numbers.

I'm sorry you've had such limited information from your medical people - and some of that (eat carbs?) very out of date.  Seems you'll have to keep doing your own research to find what works for you.  Keep reading the internet, take what seems reasonable and leave the rest.  Many of us eat low carb or GI index very successfully.  Invest in books:  Dr Atkins, South Beach Diet are good starting places.  Someone earlier suggested the Mercola website.  Make learning about this disease your #1 priority - your future depends on it.  :-)


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 10/14/2006 1:39 PM (GMT -7)   
Gem,
I would suggest that you check your local bookstore or purchase online a book that basically outlines a good Type2 diabetic diet. There are some available from Amazon that look great. You don't want a cook book, but you want a book that outlines the food plan.

Here in the US we diabetics are not restricted from eating any foods. We just have to make sure that we don't spend our calories on non-nutritious stuff like candy or soda. We don't usually label a food as bad, just a choice and some are better choices than others. I'm thinking that maybe your doctor has you on a reducing diet to help you lose weight. This will make your body use the insulin that you make much better. You most certainly will not have to stop eating bread for the rest of your life, just until you get yourself in better shape.

The alcohol is a bit of a problem, regardless, because it is metabolized (broken down) in the liver and puts extra work on that organ. It also doesn't mix well with diabetes medications and can cause low blood sugar attacks.

Can you tell us what the pamphlet your nurse gave you is called? Maybe that way we can help you more.
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


gemstar
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 6
   Posted 10/15/2006 3:36 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi jeannie,

Thanks for all this help. The pamplet is called "The way to good nutrition for people with diabetes" Its produced by our local health authority. I've studied it alot more over the last week, and from what i can see, it seems to be aimed more at protecting yourself from getting a low blood sugar result. It says to make sure i have at least 1 starchy food with each meal ie: potatos, bread, rice pasta etc... and if possible make them wholemeal for better digestion. My blood sugar very rarely drops too low, unless i've been silly and missed a meal, and i feel i can control that pretty well, i know if i'm low on sugar. Its the other end i have the problem with. I have been having success over the last few days though. I've mainly stuck to chicken and fish with lots of veg, and as snacks i've been having pumpkin/sunflower seeds, mixed nuts and fruit. And i actually did a night out and sat with fizzy water and a slice of lemon. Thought I'd be miserable, but after the first hour of people keep asking why i wasn't having a drink, i quite enjoyed being the only one with out a hangover this morning.
Had a bit of a low this afternoon, so had to lock myself away for a couple of hours, i'm finding eatiing a chore at the minute, and the pressure to keep finding meals that i can eat safely is getting me down. Especially as i'm kinda making my hubby eat the same, so i feel i need to make them interesting for him. He's not a big veggie fan.

On the whole i'd say things are better than they were just over a week ago, i'm just longing for the day when it gets alittle easier.

Thank you for taking the time out to reply to me, take care xx
michelle x

Jeannie143
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Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 10/16/2006 11:24 AM (GMT -7)   
Michelle,
You're on the right track! It's the more veggies - less starches way to go. I have hubby and grown son at home and I have to fix things they will like also. The secret is to keep track of your portion sizes and let him eat what he needs. Often, I will fix a dinner with meat and a starch (you will learn about good and better starches as you go along) and two veggies for everyone. Then I add either bread and butter or corn for the guys so they can meet their own calorie needs.

The secret to helping your body control blood sugar spikes is to mechanically make the food slowly available for absorption. Whole grain foods where the grain remains large, like brown rice, barley or oats keep their carbohydrates inside of the cell walls for a longer time as they pass through our intestines. Because the body has to digest the foods to access the starches before it can break them down into sugars it's like a time-release of carbs and this leads to a more level blood sugar. You want to try to keep your blood sugar level smoothly average throughout the day without huge highs and lows. This is also what makes vegetables so good. The carbs are encased in the plant cells and are slowly released into the intestine for absorption.

Fruits, milk and sugar all have 'ose' ingredients, fructose, lactose and sucrose. These foods are carbs that are already in the sugar stage and so we are careful in their use. We should make choices in the high sugar ('ose') foods that are also very healthy. If you have a choice between an orange and a pear, choose the orange which is a good source of vitamin C and potassium. Pears have very little nutritional value besides some fiber and their fructose carbs. Does this make sense?
Also, it's better to eat whole fruit than juice because the whole fruit must be broken down by the body before it can access the fructose, where as the fructose in the juice is available for absorption all at once as soon as it hits the intestines. 1/2 cup of orange juice may have the same number of carbs as a small orange but the juice will lead to a blood sugar spike more quickly than eating the whole fruit. (This is why you give someone with low blood sugar orange juice, not a whole orange.)

High sugar levels in the blood make the blood thicker as the large sugar molecules try to move around, much the way maple syrup is thicker than maple sap. Thicker blood with big sugar molecules is more difficult for the body to pump to all the little capillaries in the fingers and toes and that is where some of the nerve damage occurs.(neuropathy) The nerves don't get their food and oxygen because the pipeline is clogged up with big sugar molecules. These same large sugar clumps also cause problems in the small filters of the kidney and can lead to kidney failure. Sugar molecules can also clog the tiny blood vessles of the eye and they can rupture, bleed and heal causing scarring. The scars, unfortunately happen in the place where our eyes perceive images, on the retina, so high sugars lead to a type of blindness called diabetic retinopathy.

Just like sugars, there are some fats that are better than others. The fats in fish are good for our hearts and cholesterol levels. Saturated fats and partially hydrogenated shortenings and trans fats are not good for our lipid (fat) levels in our blood and should be limited but not eliminated. Most meats contain saturated fats but they also contain protein, iron, B vitamins and a host of other things we can use to keep our bodies going. So the secret to the fat thing is to use lean meats, fish and good fats like olive oil, rapeseed or canola oil, and nuts. Fats have very little effect on your sugar levels and they mechanically slow down the absorption of carbs while helping you absorb your fat soluable vitamins from the food. Small amounts of fats are necessary for skin health and vitamin absorption. They help keep hunger at bay and delay stomach emptying time.

I didn't mean to turn this into a book, but I want you to understand that you are going to need to find a way to choose your foods. You can make a chart with the foods you eat most and learn their carb, fat, protein amounts or you can follow a food plan in a book. I used a program I found online called CalorieKing that helped me in the beginning. You can do whatever you find easiest. If you keep a record of what you eat with amounts as well as sugars two hours after a meal you can then track which foods cause the highest sugars and use them in moderation. (For me it's potatoes, corn, white bread and white rice.) Eventually, just the same way you learned your multiplication tables in school, you will learn the food values and serving amounts of foods and be very able to choose what you need to eat. You will be able to fix a regular healthy meal for your family and choose your serving amounts from the foods so that you are within your food plan guidelines. You may have to measure some things in the beginning to find out how much a serving of macaroni is, or how much a serving of meat is, but very soon it will become second nature.

One last thing, about the meat, a serving of meat is about the size of a pack of cards or a piece of meat about the size and thickness of your palm of your hand. Hope this helps and sorry to write so much.
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


gemstar
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 6
   Posted 10/16/2006 2:37 PM (GMT -7)   
Jeannie you are a STAR!!! Never apologise for writing too much i'm thoroughly enjoying reading it. Foods starting to make abit more sense now, i've never had it explained to me like that before.

My hubbys managed to order me a couple of books off the internet, I think ones called something like " Your first year as a type 2 diabetic" something along those lines anyway. Should get them day after tomorrow so hopefully by next week i should be a little more knowledgeable.

Thanks for all your help jeannie xxxx

wmnak
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1123
   Posted 10/16/2006 3:43 PM (GMT -7)   

Jeannie, Sure hope you kept a hard copy of that last response!  You may not have ment to write a book, but you certainly have the basis of one.  Clear, concise, understandable, doable ... all the features we fail to learn from the 'professionals.'

Eventually we figure it out, but it is tial and error on our own without any/many guidelines.  Can you imagine how gemstar would have felt had your text been given to her at the time of diagnosis instead of the phamplet about bs lows? 

What a blessing you are!  Thanks...  :-)


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 10/16/2006 9:06 PM (GMT -7)   
Now you are making me blush... I just want to help other Type2's understand their food plans and be able to stay on track. Nutrition can be daunting when you have to learn it all at one time. I've had years to figure this all out (plus 2 years of nurse's training) so if I can make it a bit clearer for others, hooray!

One thing that I have found is that the closer to the way food is grown (the less it is processed) the better we diabetics seem to handle it. A whole fresh apple is better for blood glucose levels than apple juice or dried apples. Unpolished brown rice is better than white rice. Bulgar wheat (ground wheat berries) is better than pasta. Mmmmmm! I love pasta but have instead learned to supplement it with veggies. I add cooked spaghetti squash to my spaghetti to cut the carbs. I add thinly sliced cabbage to my soups along with less noodles to up the nutrition and cut the carbs.

And even though my last blood tests were awesome, I still have my occasional 13 french fries (which I have determined to be a serving) or my 1/2 cup ice cream cone. And I also do funny things like fix myself a bowl of oatmeal in the morning flavored with peanut butter. Starch, protein & monounsaturated fat all in a bowl. Sometimes I will skip my potato at dinner so I can have my 2 cups of popcorn with a movie in the evening. I am bumbling along trying to keep my eyesight and hold on to my feet and at the same time not make myself crazy trying to keep everything perfect. We can all do the same if we share our ideas and recipes. Hang in there!
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


walker
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 18
   Posted 10/20/2006 6:18 PM (GMT -7)   
Walker here! Newly diagnosed (Oct.'05) Learning all I can
about this disease. Just turned 50 this year. WooHoo!
Gal with a great guy.(high school sweetheart) Have good
days and bad, as far as dealing with the big "D".(get bummed out once in a while...why me...how can I deal with this for the rest of my life...can't eat now,#'s too high.) Exercise
is key. Portion sizes are wayyy important. Would appreciate
any feedback on diet,mid-day lows,before bed high #'s. I took
the diabetes education class and feel I'm up-to-date on info.
Watch D-Life on Sundays @ 7 p.m. on CNBC...get lots of good
info from that.Have a great doc and he's happy with all my #'s-
including cholesterol, A-1C, weight and daily blood sugar
readings. Still hit 200 from time to time, but I'm shooting for
no higher than 180 (after meals) and keeping levels as close
to 80-120 as possible. Take glipizide and metformin twice daily
and Lantus once daily before bed. Doc assures me that I may
be able to get off the injected insulin eventually. Any comments on that goal? Thanks for listening. Feel free to
post any comments or suggestions!

Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 10/21/2006 6:07 AM (GMT -7)   
Forgot one more thing... Vitamins!!! Diabetics should take a daily multivitamin/mineral supplement. If you are perimenopausal (irregular or skipping cycles and in your 40's or 50's) you should take something like Centrum Silver or the similar store brand. Elevated Iron levels in post menopausal women and men over 50 have been linked to higher heart attack rates so watch the iron content on your vitamins.

Taking a vitamin/mineral supplement is added insurance in case you are so busy counting carbs and fats that you don't get all your vegetables or citrus. KOKO! (Keep on keepin' on!)
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


Gramm
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 11/1/2006 11:37 AM (GMT -7)   
confused   sad about 4 pm yesterday afternoon my doc called to tell me I was now diag. as diabetic. I have been very depressed ever since. I didn't eat dinner last nite, I rushed off to work the fall festival at church, an event geared for the kids. Hotdogs and hamburgers were served, cheese burgers too, and tons of candy was there. All my favorites, lots of chocolates.I left it all alone. I drank a small glass of whole milk with my bedtimes meds.( for fibromyalgia) This morning I had no appetite either and drank a small glass of oj with my bp meds. Finally about 30 minutes ago I ate 1/2 peanut butter sandwich on whole wheat. Not from hunger but because I knew I should eat something. I'm scared and don't know what to do or eat. I just don't want anything, except for this to go away. Doc says i need to come in and learn to use a glucometer? I already had an appt. for the 8th, so i guess I will go then. I think I need some help before that, advice on how to proceed from here. Doc says this should be able to be controlled with diet. Why do I feel I have been given a death sentense? This is the first I have told of this, I haven't mentioned it to anybody. I am sure most of my family will not be a big support system. I feel really alone. Can you help me get thru this initial shock. eyes

walker
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 18
   Posted 11/1/2006 5:50 PM (GMT -7)   
Welcome Gramm...don't panic. You have friends,support,
information and encouragement here. So take a deep
breath and know that you're not alone in this struggle.
First of all, it is NOT a death sentence. Like Jeannie143
says...only if you ignore it. Read as many previous posts
at this forum as you can. Go to diabetes education
websites. Take notes, write down any questions you
think of. The glucometer is just to test your blood sugar
levels. These are important numbers to keep track of.
You'll probably feel overwhelmed with all the info at first,
but take it slow and easy. BREATHE! You'll be counting
carbs and watching portion sizes. Start reading food
labels and getting familiar with the serving size. Ask lots
of questions...here and at the doctor's visit. I was just
diagnosed a year ago and I'm still learning. Come to this
site often. It really helps. You'll get lots of support
here. One day at a time is all anyone can handle, so
lets get going and get this thing under control and start
living! don't forget to breathe yeah
think happy thoughts and stay strong.


Gramm
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 11/2/2006 5:41 AM (GMT -7)   
Thank you so very much for your sweet, and very much needed response. I keep remembering something I heard not too long ago. Eat to live, not live to eat. It make sense, but I enjoy most of the stuff thats not good for us. Whats a southern girl supposed to do? Do I learn to cook all over again? What is safe to eat now, like what would be a good menu for a whole day. What does a good choice food label say opposed to a not so good choice. I haver never read labels or cared, maybe thats what caused my problems. Again thank you for your time, well wishes and info.

wmnak
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1123
   Posted 11/2/2006 10:09 AM (GMT -7)   

Welcome, Gramm - Like us, you'll figure it out.  Diabetes is a numbers game and you'll soon learn yours, and how to manage them over the long haul.  And we are here to help.

Go back on this same thread and read Jeannie's post from October 16th - you won't find better info anywhere. 

I'm a Southerner, too (AL & TX) and yes, you'll have to make some changes ... but not everybody already knows how to cook greens and sweet potatos, lol.  I've found the low-carb approach works best for me - read Dr Atkins and South Beach Diet.  Look in the dairy case for half gallon blue cartons of Hood milk - one quarter the sugar content of all others. 

Welcome aboard ... :-)


walker
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 18
   Posted 11/2/2006 4:27 PM (GMT -7)   
Hey Gramm! wmnak is right. It's all about the numbers:
The blood sugar numbers (ideal between 80-120) and
the carbs you consume, which is what causes those
numbers to rise. One 'carb serving' =15 grams of carbo-
hydrates.(lable reading) Most sandwich bread is around
15 grams per slice which means a sandwich with regular
bread would have 2 'carb servings'. Look for the low carb
bread which is about 9 grams of carb per slice. Then you
get about 1 'carb serving' with 2 slices. Then you and your
doctor (and your blood sugar(bs) numbers) will determine
how many'carb servings' per meal and thruout the day that
you can have to keep your bs levels consistent. It takes
some trial and error to figure it out, but be patient.
You'll learn what and how much, makes your bs numbers
go too high and then adjust accordingly. Also, exercise
will knock those numbers down. A 30 minute walk is all
it takes. I have my bigger 'carb serving' meal at breakfast,
(2-3 'carb servings')then less at lunch(2 'carb servings')
and very few at dinner. But that's for you and your doc
and maybe a dietician to figure out;what works best to
get your numbers level. Of course, real sugar is no good.
I use Splenda on my cereal and in my coffee. Low fat is
good whether you have diabetes or not. Whole grain is
better...whole wheat bread,not white bread. You'll pick
it up along the way. Keep asking questions, like I said
before...here and at the doctor's. Keep at it and don't
get discouraged. We're here! And we can all continue
to learn and help each other. Go get 'em!!
think happy thoughts and stay strong.


Gramm
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 11/3/2006 6:15 AM (GMT -7)   
Good mornin' Thank you for your time and energy that you give for the help of others. A few questions come to mind.  Is it ok to eat sweet potatoes rather than white or is the natural sweetness a bad thing? Last nite I baked croaker, very lightly salted and drizzled with olive oil. I couldn't find my lemmon pepper, is that a good choice? Can you eat the skin of baked fish, chicken?  What are the best dressings for a salad, please be specific. cause I only know about ranch dressing.... I have never made like a oil and vinegar.The other nite I thought I was doing good, I put fat free  zesty Italian dressing on, only to read the label and see its got; high fructose, bet thats a nono nono  , corn syrup and salt. I don't know what to buy but I need to go grocery shopping very soon, and want to make healthy choices. Since I was diag. on Oct. 31 I have gone thru lots of different emotions. I know dispair is lurking around, waitng to nab me in a low spot. 12 years ago I had to join a club I didn't want to be in, a widows club. And now I don't want this on my plate either. (RIB EYE WOULD BE NICE) Just kiddin'.  Lord don't let me lose my sense of humor ,too. Is canned tomatoe juice ok? what about breakfast cereals....one with fiber, like a bran flake,and can i add my own raisins? what about dried prunes? They have been known to stop hunger pains. yeah ..... Please answer soon as I really need to go shopping.
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