blood sugar levels 2 hours after eating

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LanieG
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Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5404
   Posted 11/25/2006 8:01 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi, I'm wondering if someone can answer this question.  I'm supposed to measure my blood sugar two hours after eating but I've gotten different number guidelines from different sources and I'd like to know what "normal" is or rather what the parameters are.   I'm not on any medicine.  The doctor thinks my annual physical results were borderline high and that's why I'm supposed to test.  Anyway, one source online said the readings should be between 70 and 145, but another source said "less than 180".  My last reading was 140.  Also, does drinking a lot of water affect this reading?  Thanks for your help.

Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 11/25/2006 11:54 PM (GMT -7)   
Lanieg,
The two hour postprandial reading is used to discern how well your insulin is moving glucose into the cells of your muscles and organs. It is a guideline and not a direct diagnostic tool. The reasons for this are many. The reading can be affected by exercise after eating, how many carbs were consumed at the meal, the amount of fiber in the meal and the amount of fat consumed with the carbs. This is why the parameters are so wide. Also, there is a new school of thought in the management of diabetes that says stricter control is better for preventing crippling complications in the long run so they propose readings no higher than 150 two hours after a meal.

Without doing anything out of the ordinary I would propose to you that you keep a journal and do the following:
1. Get a fasting first morning reading before any coffee or food.
2. Jot down foods and amounts eaten at each meal. Remember to count fats and butter used in cooking as well as fats like mayonaise. Also note caffeine consumption if over a cup of coffee.
3. Do your 2 hr. post-eating readings.
4. Note any exercise and the duration. (This has an effect on readings.)

This will show you which times your bs readings were high and from which foods and amounts. If you are consistantly seeing high readings you may be able to adjust your diet to help bring them into a better range. You also may be able to help your numbers with exercise. If you are not diabetic then your readings will hover around 100 - 120 two hours after a meal or sweet snack like a candy bar.

If you are an insulin resistant diabetic then changing the fibrous nature of your carbs and changing your eating pattern along with exercise will help your numbers. You may also need meds to help the insulin you make work better.

Water will only minimally lower numbers. When our sugar is high our bodies thirst because the kidneys demand more water to help eliminate the high sugar from the bloodstream and flush it into the urine. This is not an optimal way to reduce high sugars. It's hard on the kidneys and the circulatory system as well. High sugars act like maple syrup or honey and clog up the tiny arteries and capillaries in our eyes, liver, kidneys and the ones that supply the oxygen to our fingers and toes. Increasing water in the system will help dilute the blood somewhat but will not prevent organ damage. It will, however, help the kideys do their job more efficiently.
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5404
   Posted 11/26/2006 8:10 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for all your information!  Wow.  From reading through a lot of these postings, I've learned a lot and I'm amazed that there are so many factors that can affect blood sugar.  When the doctor suggested that I make a record of what and when I eat, I didn't realize how important that was.  Well, here I go!

TALLDUDE
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 38
   Posted 11/26/2006 3:06 PM (GMT -7)   
I STILL CAN'T GET BELOW 225....WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

JGriffin
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 104
   Posted 11/26/2006 6:06 PM (GMT -7)   
The best thing that happened to me after I was diagnosed as a type 2 was to be referred to a diabetes nutrition counselor. I was eating too many carbs and only watching my sugar consumption. And I didn't eat six times a day or do the bedtime snack. I was really surprised to learn of the glycemic index and how much just pedalling a stationery bike could reduce my morning sugar. Can you ask your doctor to send you to a nutritional counselor? It helped me get my sugars under control. Good luck.

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5404
   Posted 11/26/2006 6:27 PM (GMT -7)   
That's exactly what I'm going to do.  The more I've learned recently, the more I realize how much I don't know.  My sister told me to look at the South Beach Diet because it also lists foods and their glycemic indexes (is that the plural form?).  But you bring up another point.  It's better to have 6 small meals?  Are you counting a snack as a meal or do you mean dividing a day's worth of food into 6 smaller meals?  Now it's making more sense to me.  This means blood sugar readings would be lower if the system isn't dealing with a lot of food at one time compared to an entire dinner? 

JGriffin
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 104
   Posted 11/26/2006 9:11 PM (GMT -7)   
Jeannie 143 is our resident expert on food! She and Warren helped me with a LOT of good advice on eating and the glycemic index. The nutrition expert gave me a food plan with how many carbs, etc. to eat at a time. I have three meals a day with three snacks...one before bedtime. After I got the hang of counting carbs and not overloading my system, I learned to always eat some fiber, and/or protein, and fat to hold the food in my stomach longer and slow its release into my system. White bread - even in the crust of pizza - will raise my levels...white potatoes and white rice also. If you get a good counselor, they can help you SO much by giving you a food plan to begin and teaching you to choose wisely from then on. And don't forget the daily exercise...no excuses! One year ago my A1C was 6.9 with average sugar of 160. This last October my A1C was 5.3 with average of 98. It takes will power and planning, but I can even travel if I think ahead and have my snacks with me. For me the key was eating correctly, exercising, and taking glucophage once a day. You are so lucky that your doctor is making you aware of this while you may be able to change your lifestyle to slow or prevent the progress of the disease.

Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 11/27/2006 9:50 AM (GMT -7)   
South Beach is good... Amend it to work with your real food plan (ie. the foods you will really buy and eat) and you will be off to a good start. Take someone along with you when you go to your nutritional classes. Two heads are better than one at remembering the fine points. You're on the right track. When you said you have become aware of all you don't know I was sure you are heading in the right direction.
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5404
   Posted 11/27/2006 3:24 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks very much, Jeannie 143 and JGriffin, for all your advice and knowledge you've given me.  From what I've learned in the last month, I would say the diet I'm supposed to follow is a healthy diet for everyone, not just those dealing with diabetes.  The doctor gave me printouts of menus and such but I have an appointment next week with their nutritionist.  Now, I understand the theory behind the foods on the list.  In the meantime, I've cut out sugar, white flour products, potatoes and rice because the readings are higher after eating any of that.  What a learning process.  Thanks again. :-)
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