Meds & Insulin

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Rose118
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 22
   Posted 12/31/2006 12:19 AM (GMT -7)   
Is it possible for Type 2 Diabetics to never have to go on insulin? Or is it inevitable at some point in the disease?
 
Why is that some people have to go on more than one med?
 
I'm only on Metformin and hoping that will be the only med I have to take, and with watching my weight and exercising, I'm hoping I can get off that as well. Is it possible to live 20 years or more with diabetes but not to have to be on meds?
~Valerie~
 
Bad spellers of the world, untie!


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 12/31/2006 12:29 AM (GMT -7)   
Yup, it's possible to never go on meds. Some meds help your body use it's own insulin better. Some meds help your insulin get into the cells better. Some meds are insulin to make up for the amount that isn't working. Some meds stop your body from absorbing so many carbs.

If you visit this link you will find some postings about different meds:

Type 2 meds
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 12/31/2006 6:53 AM (GMT -7)   
I've got the same goal you do, Valerie. A l-o-n-g life with as few meds as possible!
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


Rose118
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 22
   Posted 12/31/2006 11:06 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks Jeannie, that was great information. I have one more question though. On the Heading "Insulin", It says
Eventually, however, the disease deteriorates in many people with type 2 diabetes and full insulin replacement is required.
Is this quite common that insulin will be required at some point? Have you heard of people never needing insulin in their lifetime?

 


~Valerie~
 
Bad spellers of the world, untie!

Post Edited (Rose118) : 12/31/2006 11:11:46 AM (GMT-7)


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 12/31/2006 1:14 PM (GMT -7)   

I know a type II diabetic who has managed his diabetes by exercise and eating a heart-healthy diet for 18 years now (he's 71 and still running the stairs like Rocky Balboa for 1 hour+ per day). He does not count his carbs- but he only eats heart healthy foods. He does eat some low fat meats, but not a lot.  He has no complications of diabetes and his lipid profile and BP are better than most healthy folks. He was diagnaosed with BG level of over 400. 

I have corresponded with another person (my doctor had her contact me when I said I wanted to move to a drug-free control regimen) who has had diabetes for over 20 years. She manages with a very low carb diet and exercise and is in her mid 60's- she has no complications that I have heard about. Both of these folks have typical BG readings in the 80-90 range and their A1cs tend to be between 4.7 and 5.5. So, it is possible to live a long and complication free life with diabetes. I think maintaining tight control of what goes into your body and daily exercise are the keys to success. sandy :-)


I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5408
   Posted 12/31/2006 2:08 PM (GMT -7)   
confused   Gelchick or Jeannie (or anyone), is it possible to have higher than normal readings if I eat more than I should at a meal even if the food is 'good' normally, like chicken breast, broccoli, salad?   I know I ate too much one night but the food I ate was only what I mentioned and no carbs.  Is there too much of a good thing?
 
Lanie

Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 12/31/2006 7:11 PM (GMT -7)   
Valerie,

The post read "the disease deteriorates in many people with type 2 diabetes" not in ALL people. Much of the course of the disease depends upon the individual, their lifestyle, heredity, ethnicity, culture and foods, and some things that the scientists haven't even identified yet. Getting someone on a low income who has always lived on tortillas and refried beans or fried catfish and ham hocks with sweet potato pie to change to salads and lean meat may be almost impossible. It takes the hard work of a dedicated nutritionist to find ways to change familiar fare to something with lower saturated fats and less carbs.

Many people, especially low income people, don't have access to a nutritionist and have to try to find their way all on their own. Unfortunately it is the way of our culture to give people medication rather than to try to re-educate them because nutritional re-education often flies in the face of custom, familiarity and habit. I had an acquaintance who came here from Haiti and she treated her diabetes with rice and fruit because she was sure that those pure foods could never hurt her. I tried to help her understand the new way to eat but she just couldn't accept it.

Lanie,
Readings can be affected by so many things it's difficult to gauge what made your readings go where. Did you test two hours after the meal? Did you have a carb loaded lunch? Did you do any exercise that day? Exercise can burn up most of the available blood glucose which sets off an alarm in the brain. In Type 2's if glucose levels reach a certain low point the brain signals the liver to release glucogon, a stored form of glucose, to raise blood sugar levels. (The brain runs on pure glucose and will do ANYTHING to keep it's supply going regardless of the problems it may cause in the rest of the body.) You could have had a low before the meal that signaled the release of glucogon and then ate the meal... The salad dressing could have been loaded with carbs... It's been my experience that 'low fat' dressings are very high in carbs so I base my purchase choices on the carbs per two tablespoon serving as written on the label. Dressings that are higher in olive oil usually are lower in carbs and vinegar and oil is carb free. You may be having holiday stress or the whole thing may have been because it was a Tuesday...

This is why a journal is so helpful. You can note foods and amounts, exercise, blood sugar readings, moods and anything else you think may matter. Helps you see patterns and will help prove to your doctor that you are headed in the right direction, or if your body stops cooperating you'll have a record of what's up and see when and if you need to start some meds to help keep those numbers in line. Remember it's all about the numbers, not the meds or diet that causes them. Doing what it takes to get the numbers right is the goal, however you get there.
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross

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