what is thenormal range for glucose

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anglfrmhvn69
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   Posted 1/3/2007 10:26 AM (GMT -7)   
i thought that anything under 120 was normal but the doc told me mine was slightly high at 103
pamela


Chutsman
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Total Posts : 64
   Posted 1/3/2007 2:19 PM (GMT -7)   
It's hard to know what to believe - there's a school of thought out there that the drug companies get the FDA to lower what is "normal" ... give you one guess why.  eyes


The short form for "you are" is "you're", NOT "your".


4sons
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Total Posts : 406
   Posted 1/3/2007 3:53 PM (GMT -7)   
Interesting you should mention that, Chutsman, just yesterday I was talking to my chiropractor who practically laughed out loud when I told him what my diabetes doctor says my bs should be. He's convinced this is all about the drug companies. Ditto for the cholesterol range.
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


Warren
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Total Posts : 534
   Posted 1/3/2007 4:00 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi,
 
Ok, first off, the FDA really doesn't have anything to do with whats "normal" for blood sugar levels.  There is a ton of stuff written in our threads on this topic but the executive summary is there is a double standard. "Whats acceptable for Diabetics" and "Whats acceptable for Non-Diabetics"!! The American Diabetes Association and most Endocrinologists will try tell you that as a "Diabetic" if you can keep your fasting blood sugar under 120, thats a good thing.  Now the same Endocrinologist will tell you if you are normal, you should be at 100 or less for your fasting blood sugar.
 
There are many reasons for this dual scale that Im not going into here; just know that it exists.  For my money, I TRY to stay on the "Normal Person Scale" rather than the "Diabetic" scale.  And I try and do this without undo scarifice or stress to my lifestyle.  I just figure that a little more aggressive control now will stave off diabetic related problems a bit longer in my later years.  Hope this helps.
 
scool  Warren

quatlox
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Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 41
   Posted 1/4/2007 1:34 PM (GMT -7)   
Warren pretty much summed it up.
 
If you want a range, try this one:
 
     80 - 120
 
 
Below 80 is Hypoglycemic - LOW (eat something) and above 120 is Hyperglycemic - HIGH (I won't tell you to do meds as many of us are on different meds that act very different and many times I get myself into trouble when I start chasing the slight highs with insulin and end up being really LOW a couple of hours later), but if it is really high I will do about 1 unit of insulin for every 40 points on the "range" to bring it down to an acceptable level, (just don't forget to make sure and check about 2 hours later for that LOW).
 
I also think any DR will approve of a diabetic within the 80 - 120 range.
 
Bob

gelchick
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Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 1/4/2007 2:01 PM (GMT -7)   

Time of Check

Goal plasma blood glucose ranges
for people without diabetes

Goal plasma blood glucose ranges
for people with diabetes

Before breakfast (fasting)

< 110

90 - 130

Before lunch, supper and snack

< 110

90 - 130

Two hours after meals

< 140

< 160

Bedtime

< 120

110 - 150

A1C (also called glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c or glycohemoglobin A1c)

< 6%

< 7%

 
These are the ranges from the Joslin Diabetes Center- with diet, exercise, and metformin I am able to keep my fastings in the 75-90 range. My 2 hour readings are rarely over 120. I'll be going for my A1c in 10 days and I expect it to be below 6%.
 
I recently split my exercise into 3 sessions of 20-25 minutes (walk on treadmill or exercise bike) and am finding that my overall readings are trending downward - and I haven't changed the intensity or total time of the exercise, just the time interval. I hope it continues. :-)
I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


Chutsman
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Date Joined Jul 2005
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 1/4/2007 2:08 PM (GMT -7)   
You're doing excellent gelchick ... who says you have diabetes?

The short form for "you are" is "you're", NOT "your".


4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 1/4/2007 3:58 PM (GMT -7)   
Gelchick ... your numbers are awesone!

Tell me what you eat ...

I can keep my morning numbers LOW but have a hard time during the day. I'm sure part of it is because of my nutsy work schedule. What is it that you do that allows you to break up your exercise into three segments! Right now I'm happy as a clam if I can cram it in after I get home from school and before I collapse from exhaustion!!!

Way to go!!!!!!
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


Jeannie143
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Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 1/4/2007 4:38 PM (GMT -7)   
Ruth and all,

Asking your chiropractor about diabetes is like asking your plumber about auto repair. I would never take any medical advice concerning diabetes from a chiropractor. They have absolutely NO training in this area. Your dentist knows more about diabetes than a chiropractor... in fact your veterinarian knows more about this disease than a chiropractor!

Chiropractors may have their place in a person's overall health but they should not be consulted about things that are not in their realm of practice. Sorry if I sound peeved here but I get upset with some people who wear white coats and speak as if they know more than they do.

And as far as the drug company conspiracy theory... People who work for the drug companies have diabetes, too. They have parents and grandparents and babies and children with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who are on dialysis, who are blind, who have lost limbs. How much money would it take for someone to hold back a cure if they had one for their own child or parent? I just can't buy into this whole anti-medication movement. Just my 2ยข here but it seems like when I was young our generation (60's-70's) would put just about anything into our bodies and now they are all about 'natural' and anti-pill, anti-treatment. Sorry to be so grumpy about this but it really burns my biscuits!

I do believe that medication is waaaaay too expensive. I'll give you that! I have no insurance and am finding it difficult at times to purchase my meds. But to believe that the companies are trying to create artificial markets for their meds by getting the standard glucose numbers changed doesn't even make sense to me. If the numbers for diagnosis had been at this level thirty years ago when my fasting sugars were running 120 - 130 I would have had a lifestyle change back then. Instead, I blindly carried on with my regular course of action and now have neuropathy in my feet, some kidney damage and eye changes... and I've started insulin to help keep my numbers down.

For a diabetic to attain lower numbers means changing eating patterns, exercise patterns, stress levels, and even drinking. To ignore the numbers as I did 10 years ago when I was finally diagnosed was stupid on my part but I wish the numbers would have seemed more alarming to me. My damage all happened at pretty average and low levels... Even when I was treating with diet alone my glycohemoglobins were never higher than 6.0. I hate this disease and the way it's always there at every bite I put in my mouth... counting, counting, counting... but at least I can see the food I'm counting. My father-in-law couldn't. He's the one that really got me to pay attention. LIke I said... sorry to be so grumpy, just having a bad day. mad
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


anglfrmhvn69
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 297
   Posted 1/5/2007 4:32 AM (GMT -7)   
thanks for the info it really helped alot,i understand much better now
pamela


4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 1/5/2007 4:44 PM (GMT -7)   
Oooooook. Well, I wasn't going to take his advice anyhoo ... but I did think what he had to say was interesting.
 
Jeannie, you've mentioned your low/average bs levels and the damage sustained even at those numbers. I am not trying to make you re-live that time, nor do I want to bug you about it ... but tell me again, if you would.

When you said you "fell off the wagon" were you still taking your bs??? How do you know those readings were still so low/average?
 
Or are you saying that your readings were low/average according to the former quidelines and even at *those* low/average numbers you sustained damage?
 
I'm trying to learn ....
 
Thanks!
Ruth/4sons
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


Jeannie143
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Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 1/5/2007 11:07 PM (GMT -7)   
My sugars were running 130 or so before meals and 180's two hours after meals and my doctor wasn't really concerned. But that was about 8 years ago, before the researchers decided that there is no excuse for those high numbers. I started developing nerve damage in my hands and feet in my 20's before I was even diagnosed. My kids used to complain that the bath water was too hot so I finally got a bath thermometer (like for a baby's bath) and they were right! I just couldn't feel it.

I know now that I've had symptoms of diabetes a lot longer than I've had the diagnosis. Always thirsty, lots of yeast infections, tons of cavities, itchy skin... I had the symptoms but I never connected the dots. You have to remember, Ruth, that there were different meds and different ideas about diabetes 35 years ago. You are in much better shape now than I was then. Home testing for blood sugar didn't even exist back then. You had to go get a blood draw at a lab. Most doctors were doing sugar checks on your urine in the office, not your blood. Even the glycohemoglobin test wasn't done. So when I did most of my damage I have no way of knowing my numbers. Later, after I was diagnosed I still didn't want to admit I had this disease and I cycled thru times of good choices and bad. But my first numbers weren't in the 300's or anything.

My home testing used to run mornings in the 120's up until I started on Lantus insulin a few years ago. Now I wake up to 90's most every morning. You have the advantage of starting this disease with a blood monitor and the ability to see the results of overindulgences on your meter right when it is happening. You can learn from your errors and change your food and exercise choices and get immediate numbers to show you what is working and what is a problem. You have the ability to let your doctor know when your numbers run high and stay high (which very well may happen) and then alert him/her so you can maybe start meds to get the numbers back in line. You can maybe lose weight and see how it helps your numbers. You have the tools right in your hands to see where you are going. And, if you are lucky you may beat the odds and keep this whole thing under control and avoid the meds. But it's not the meds or the lack of meds to be concerned about. It's the numbers. Whatever it takes to keep them down. Exercise, stress reduction, voodoo, anything that works! I'm all about that.
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 1/6/2007 1:13 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks, Jeannie ...

You're right ... times HAVE changed!

If I go on meds I go on meds. They're a blessing when needed, no doubt about it.

I'm with you 100% ... it's all about the numbers!
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 1/6/2007 12:22 PM (GMT -7)   
Sorry to be so long to respond- big deadline at work kept me from having fun on the Internet.
First to Chutsman-
At my diagnosis in July, my fasting BG was 457 and my A1c was 15- there is no doubt that I am a diabetic. I have been fortunate to bring my levels down quickly by diet, exercise and medication. I was first placed on Acto+ Met but the actos made me hold water like a sponge, so I refused to take it. My doctor upped my dose of Metformin, I upped my dose of exercise and refined my diet and my numbers have stabilized at my current levels. I have just decreased my night time dose of metformin because I see no difference in my AM or daytime readings.
 
To 4sons
 
I am a science writer and product development manager for a company that creates products for high school and college level classrooms and laboratory classes. I work for them as a virtual employee because we relocated 3 states away when my husband was downsized last year. They were unable to find a replacement and they offered to let me work from my new location until they hired someone or my current project wrapped up. So far- I'm still employed - :-)
 
So, I exercise before work, duirng my lunch hour, and while I watch the evening news (which I would do even if I had to go to the office every day)- it's a habit now- I just go and do it.
 
I use the Insulin-Resistance diet to manage my carbs. It is a link and balance approach where you link 7 grams of protein to 15 grams of carb. You don't eat more than 30 carbs in a 2 hour period. You can go to Amazon.com and do a search- the book is there and there's a lot of reader feedback. I tried the diabetes diet prescribed by a diabetes dietitian that my doctor referred me to- it made my sugar stay high all the time (steady but high), I tried the very low carb approach that Bernstein advocates live by, but it was just too restrictive for my vegetarian lifestyle.
Using the link and balance approach, I eat more carbs than the dietitian allowed, but so far my sugar stays in control at all times. For example, my daughter and I baked a lot of cookies at Christmas - I was able to sample them by linking the carb to a protein (lo carb Hood milk or no-fat ***e yogurt) with no significant rise in my bg- I was so happy- other than that, I don't use artificial sweetners, eat only heart healthy fats and nuts, and try to avoid processed foods in general.
 I have been able to lose about 30 # since my diagnosis without pain too- an unexpected surprise- since my focus was on getting control of my BG first and foremost. I firmly believe that this is the result of daily exercise and linking and balancing my carbs.
peace-sandy
I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 1/6/2007 12:32 PM (GMT -7)   
Gelchick,
I had no idea you were vegetarian. I really admire your dedication to getting your numbers in line. In fact, could I possibly hire you as a personal trainer? (LOL!) BTW, I've heard you speak of Hood milk before, where do you find it? I live in Michigan.
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 1/7/2007 4:33 PM (GMT -7)   
Gelchick ... I'll check that out! Do you eat 30 grams of carbs a day? My carb level is LOW now and I reallly don't feel deprived, but I'll tell you ... I just got home from a weekend away and had to not eat ONE BITE of bread or anything for fear of overdoing it. I'd love to eat more carbs!!!

Jeannie ... I'm in Holland, MI ... where are you?
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 1/7/2007 6:16 PM (GMT -7)   
LOL- I'd suck as a personal trainer! I just plod along, or ride the exercise bike with due diligence- boring as my daughter tells me- but it gets the job done!
 
I get the Hood milk at my local Super WalMart and some of our Kroger's carries it- but I've seen it at every WalMart with a grocery- I'm in Ohio, but I've seen it in NY, RI and MN (visiting my kids, mom etc)- so I think it's a farily universal item for them.
 
I actually eat between 150 and 180 net carbs a day with this link and balance approach. Most days, I get about 50-60 grams of fiber.  So, I am eating a LOT of carbs each day with this plan. I always link 15 grams of carbs with 7 grams of protein. That way I can eat an apple, a cup of berries, 10 oz of ***e yogurt and 1/2 cup of Fiber One cereal for breakfast and by BG level never rises more than 15 points. AT the 3 hour mark I am always at or lower than my AM fasting or premeal reading and I stay there most of the day.
 
I try to only eat low GI and low GL foods- my carbs include a lot of beans, lentils, barley, oatmeal- low GI items with a good amount of fiber- I think it helps. I always link 15 grams of carb to 7 grams of protein (30/14, 45/21 etc) - so many of my meals have a lot more than 30 grams of carb- but the carbs are always covered with the right amount of protein. 
 
I have tested a lot of different combos of food - and for me, this approach works really well. I never feel deprived, I can generally eat at any restaurant my friends want to try- I started slowly because I didn't think it would work- but so far so good!
sandy
I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


Jeannie143
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Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 1/8/2007 8:40 AM (GMT -7)   
Gelchick,
I'm dying of curiosity to know what the censor is blocking from your yogurt!!! Anyway, did you do this from a book or are you just plain brilliant when it comes to balancing nutrition? i still want you as my food consultant at least. I can pay in wedding cake! tongue

I'll have to look for hoods milk... Don't do Kroger for personal reasons, haven't been to a Wal-mart yet... too many big stores in town. I'll keep my eyes peeled.

Ruth,
I'm in Lansing! You can click on my name on the left and it will take you to my personal profile where you can visit my homepage.
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 1/8/2007 10:42 AM (GMT -7)   
Gelchick/Jeannie ... I've been wondering about that yogurt as well!!!
 
Gelchick, not to get personal ... but how's that diet work w/weight? Have you gained/lost/or stayed the same?

Jeannie, GORGEOUS website ... HOLY SMOKES those cakes are AMAZING!!!!!!! If I ever remarry (highly unlikely, but not a total impossiblity) I'd LOVE to hire you! I bet I could even get a Lansing friend to deliver to West Michigan!!!!
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 1/9/2007 10:06 AM (GMT -7)   
hmmm... the censor blocked the name of my yogurt haha - Im going to try a phonetic spelling of it and see (ffffff age) - it's a greek yogurt that you can get at Whole Foods or Trader Joe's - TRader Joe has its own brand which is about 1/2 the cost of the other.
Too bad I didn't know about your cakes when my daughter was getting married- we sampled about 50 before she found the perfect looking and tasting cake at a little Polish bakery we stopped at to get directions when we were lost- that cake had about a 2 inch layer of buttercream frosting (my daughter eats it with a spoon-she loves it so much) and the most tender yellow cake with an almond essence that I've ever eaten. I didn ot want to make ot eat cake for a year after all that tasting!
 
I started with the Insulin-Resistance diet book- and changed it up to fit my personal needs. I am not brilliant by any means, but my PhD is in protein biochemistry so I have a fair understanding of how the metabolic processes in the body are supposed to work. This approach made a lot of sense to me from a biochemical standpoint and allowed me to maintain my vegetarian lifestyle.
 
The basis of the book is weight loss- in Border's it's shelved with the weight loss books  not the health books - I have lost about 30 pounds since I began eating this way- at first, 2-3 pounds a week and lately about 3/4 per week. I eat more than the 'diet' recommends- but I always follow the principles of linking and balancing. I have to say that I do not feel deprived in any way, and I can go out and not be a pain in the backside when it comes to choosing a place to eat. My friends have all adjusted to finding veggie friendly places - veggie and diabetic friendly might put a crimp on our fun otherwise. 
 
I just read a very interesting article about low carb diets and BG control, and how a doctor in Kansas treats all of her type 2's with a low carb diet (with lots of low carb veggies) initially rather than drug them up. I am going to try and contact her to see how she treats veggie patients. In the meantime, I am considering dropping my carb levels to around 75-100 net for a couple of weeks to see what happens. peace- sandy :-)
 
I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 1/9/2007 1:30 PM (GMT -7)   
Sandy,
One thing I know is that if your carb level drops too low it can goof up your metabolism. You may want to go the other way and stay at this carb level and up your exercise? By the way... you said you're not brilliant by any means but your "Phd is in protein biochemistry!?!?!" So did you just get that diploma online or were they just handing them out to every other person at Graduation as sort of a parting gift? (LOL!)

(Jeannie walks away mumbling about people hiding their lights under a bushel basket...)
~ Jeannie

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."

- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 1/9/2007 3:41 PM (GMT -7)   
Jeannie143 said...
Sandy,
"Phd is in protein biochemistry!?!?!"


Uh yeah ... what Jeannie said.
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 1/11/2007 9:06 AM (GMT -7)   

I am really laughing-this time.

I'm going to share a secret with you- PhD really stands for PILED HIGH and DEEP! My thesis advisor always told us that he'd sign off on our research when he got tired of us - my experience was that once you started to think that you knew more about your topic than he did, and were willing to debate him publically, he'd start to make noises about how his funding was getting low and maybe you should think about assembling your committee to petition for a defense date.

The hardest part is getting high enough test scores on the GRE's to get admitted- then it's just a matter of perseverance-

I'm going to ramp down on the carbs slowly and see how I function- I know there are people who live the Bernstein lifestyle and I don't plan to go that low- but I do find the idea interesting and the lower carbs might give my pancreas a little rest. I'm already exercising about 90 minutes a day and don't have the ambition to do more right now- maybe when it's warm and I can go outside- but I'm intrigued by the idea that if I drop my carbs a bit lower, maybe I can get off the metformin and just control with diet and exercise.

peace- sandy :-)


I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 1/11/2007 3:03 PM (GMT -7)   
Hey Sandy,

Do you watch NOVA, per chance? Did you see the info. about low cal diets???? Apparently mice have a much greater longevity with a low cal diet. It keeps them from producing too much ... INSULIN!

Very interesting study.

A couple years ago I had a friend in Chicago do exactly this ... let's say that for her height the "acceptable" weight range was from 117 - 145 (which is what it is for me at 5'4"). She REFUSED to go above 105 which was 10% below. I don't know if I could sustain that (she has a tiny frame and I have a medium one) but that woman is HEALTHY.

Food for thought.

And yes, pun intended ...
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 1/12/2007 12:17 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi,

I didn't see the NOVA show- but those mouse studies were done a few years back and there is a whole contigent of people who eat very low calorie around- there's a bunch of web-sites and forums dedicated to the topic.

Of course, you never know how mouse studies will translate to people long term- and how do you draw the line between very low cal and undernourished? Rat and mouse chow is scientifically balanced to meet the nutritional needs of the animals- they eat better than most of their keepers - it's required by law and university policy. You get a lot of rules when you want to experiment on animals- how to transport them from the colony to your lab, how they can be treated in the lab- you have to be certified to handle the animal, draw blood, give injections, perform surgery etc. EVery bit of your protocol has to be reviewed and approved by the ethics committee and vets are always popping into the lab to see that you are following the rules- if not- they fine you and shut you down.

If lack of calories is the key to good health and longevity, then most of the world should be living into their 100's. In countries where nutrition is an issue, the populations doesn't have a long lifespan overall.  We are beginning to understand the consequences of being overfed, and my guess is that being underfed will have it's long term consequences too, just like being undernourished does. Wehn the oldest members of the population are interviewed for their secrets- they never mention undereating- but they do mention exercise and eating in moderation- a lot.

Your friend sounds healthy- so she must get a good amount of nutrients- and some people can sustain low weights. Not me- I'm a true endomorph - by every criteria. The best I can hope for is achieving a normal BMI- and good control of my BG, BP and lipids.

sandy


I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett

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