trying to understand the numbers

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cooperazi
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 47
   Posted 2/19/2007 12:42 PM (GMT -7)   
Hello,  I am new to this forum.  I was diagnosed type II diabetes in 2003, was doing my best to keep my numbers in check with diet and exercise.  Was doing well, got my ABHIC to within the 5's and I think I was even a 4 once.  Then I was diagnosed with colon rectal cancer, and well, the last two years have been coping with the treatment, surgery, and aftermath.  I will be cancer free three years in July if I get clean check up.  Ok, I digress.    Well, I am now back to trying to focus on keeping my numbers in control with diet and exercise.  I keep running into roadblocks, but I keep trying.  Just recently I have developed a really bad knee (digenitive joint) so I have been not exercising like I had been, and my number went back up to 6.9. I brought it back down to 6.1 last test.  Also dealing with the other numbers, cholesteral, tryglicerdies, etc.  Exercise does help me, and I have found even if I do the treadmill slower, because of knee, it still is effective.  I am terrified of the meds and what they do to the liver, etc.  Like I said I am a surving cancer  patient, and this cancer does go to the liver if it were to spread.  I have from the beginning had the morning high numbers.  I have had on a rare occasions had some really good numbers for me (114 117, 119) but no rhyme or reason to them.  I have tried the protien snack before bed, again hit and miss.  Now last night after dinner I was pleased as punch with myself.  I had a salad with chicken, and a half of a carnitas burrito(just meat and veggies, no beans, whole wheat tortilla) with hubby.  It was a nice size dinner, and I was so shocked, my after dinner number was 110 (9pm) I was not expecting that.  Well, I say that to say this...I took  my night time count at 1:14am (stayed up late) and it was 148!  I did not have any snacks, nothing but diet root beer and water earlier.  So ok, I say maybe the dawn phenonomen, I eat a small non fat activia yogurt and and I wake up with 148 blood sugar.  My numbers have been running real well in the daytime.  It just seems so unfair, that this happens at night, when you are sleeping.  I do not want to take meds, so will these night time numbers be bad for me if my averages are in the good range?  If I keep on the treadmill and bring my numbers back down to the fives, will I be ok? Or even if I stay in the low six?  How damaging are these nighttime numbers?  I am currently testing more than doctor thought I needed to test, but I am trying so hard to see how my body reacts and does not react.  I want to get comfortable with what I am doing so I can do the random testing every other day, etc.  Thanks, I know this was a long post.  I am just so frustrated right now!  Cooperazi

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 2/19/2007 2:02 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi Cooperazi, first of all, congratulations on being cancer free for almost 3 years.  I'm sure this has made your life a roller coaster especially trying to control your blood sugar numbers and then dealing with those ups and downs.  I can't add much to help you because I'm also trying to control diabetes with diet and exercise and have flip flopped around since the fall figuring just what will raise my numbers.  And though every person's body might be in a different stage of diabetes and react differently to food, I have discovered that eating much smaller meals but eating about 5 times a day has helped me keep my own numbers manageable.  I also exercise every day on a treadmill and eliptical trainer and some resistance machines.  It took a while for me to get used to small portions on my plate but since I'll eat something a few hours later (like some of the same lunch food, for example) I'm not hungry.  So, for me it's smaller portions, very little carbs and exercise.  Stress can also cause higher numbers, or other medication you might be taking.  Another thing I discovered is that sugar-free chocolate raises my blood sugar because of the sugar alcohols, so even 'sugar-free' food might affect you.  I'm sure others here on the forum will be answering you when they read your posting.  I've found lots of great information here.  You're not alone here.  Good luck!

Lanie


cooperazi
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 47
   Posted 2/19/2007 2:30 PM (GMT -7)   

Thanks lanieg for your reply.  Yes the cancer thing took a lot out of me.  The diabetes went on the back burner for a while.  Even wondered if I did not have diabetes in the first place, as my numbers after my surgery were  not really bad.   I mean I would eat candy, bread, you name it and my numbers were ok (I was in the I do not want to deal with this mode, because of the cancer etc.)  The doctor said it was possible that could happen.  However, when my three month numbers started to creep up again I came to the conclusion I must be diabetic, and if not fully diabetic (insulin resistant, glugose intolant, whatever) I still needed to take this very seriously and get it under control.  So I started back to testing regular, and was shocked at some of numbers!  I had some 200's after meals, and that really sobered me up.  My sister in law, ignored her type II, and she has had strokes, blindness, and leg problems.  

Well, my after breakfast (oatmeal and blueberries) my bs was 112.  So that is good.  I too am finding less at each sitting is better.  I try for the 1/2 sandwich, instead of whole, and try to have more salads.  I have gotten bad because of certain life style modes, I eat out alot.  So like I said, I am trying to  make healthier choices about that also.  I do so want to avoid the medications as long as possible.  I do take the supplements, chromium P, cinnamon, daily vitamin, fish oil, something for my joints ?? baby asprin, vit. C, and of course now the pain meds for my knee.  Try to hold off on those as much as possible.  And then there are the bloodpressure and cholesterol meds, YUCK!  I do not think they are working very well.  I am going to try and take care of myself better, loose weight, exercise and get off those meds as well.   I am sure coming here to get and give support will be a big step in learning to live with diabetes and control it as much as I am able.  Thanks, Cooprazi 


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 2/19/2007 3:11 PM (GMT -7)   

Oh boy, I hear you.  I've lost 12 lbs since last fall and I need to lose more.  I also take BP medicine.  The doctor's concern last fall was a wake-up call because I had to get a glucose monitor.  My morning fasting was around 116.  It had crept up for a couple of years now but until last fall, the doctor wasn't agressive about controlling it.  If she had been a couple of years ago, I would have started all this earlier.  Anyway, I'm trying to lose weight (20 more to go) and hoping that will have an impact in the blood sugar and the BP.  I tried to follow the insulin resistant diet by pairing proteins and carbs but honestly, my numbers were still high, so I've worked out my own plan which is doing ok for now.  But I don't want to start meds unless I just can't control these numbers myself in my way.  (I know, I know, people are going to tell me being on meds is not the end of the world.....).  Since I've been doing the exercising everyday, my resting heart rate has lowered and my BP too.  I go back to the doctor the end of March and I'm hoping my overall blood tests will be better.  Has your doctor referred you to a nutritionist?  They can be helpful.  I have also learned a lot on this forum (try reading back through past postings) and I read everything I can about diabetes.  Eating out is challenging for sure.  Lots of salads, no bread and I even put the croutons aside!  Water or diet iced tea.  Over the weekend, we dined in a really nice place and I had chicken breast (I ate half because it was really too big and gave the rest to my husband who'll eat anything.), asparagus and stupid little carrots - I only ate one of those and gave the rest to you-know-who.  That, with their salad and a complimentary crab cake, filled me up because it was more than I usually eat at one time.  I was disappointed that my fasting the next morning was 109 but I sort of expected it because of all the food I ate.  Ask your doctor for some guidance.  Hopefully he/she can figure out the erratic numers you're having.  And then go for a 20 minute walk.

Lanie


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 2/19/2007 8:55 PM (GMT -7)   
Hey Lanie and Cooperazi,

"being on meds is not the end of the world"!!! LOL! You both are having great numbers so unlax a bit, ok? Any time numbers stay above 150 more than two hours after a meal is when you get concerned. You are both doing fine. Try to be a little more kind to yourselves and that alone will start lowering your stress levels.

Cooper, I swim at the Y in the nice heated pool and that is very nice to my bad knees and spine. You might try that for exercise... Welcome to HW. Hope this helps.
~ Jeannie
Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class!
Yours may be one of them...

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


cooperazi
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 47
   Posted 2/19/2007 11:27 PM (GMT -7)   
 Jeannie,  Thank you for your encouragement.  Question, you say when your numbers stay above 150 or more for longer than two hours that is not good.  So when I go to bed and wake up with the 148, who knows how many hours my numbers were that high or higher.  My numbers seem to be good during day when I AM GOOD LOL.  Today ate 1/2 peanut butter sandwich, and a few green grapes.  Would have been fine, but because my before meal was 97, I treated myself to some stress food (popcorn) ate too much and my number went to 210.  Bummer!  I went down to 115 before dinner.  I am testing probably more than I need to, but I am trying to be very aware of how my body is working.  Like I posted above I am afraid of the effect the meds have on the liver.  Have a friend who is diabetic, but also now has severe liver damage, spitting up the blood and all.  The doctor did say the meds could have done some liver damage.  So me having the cancer and all, I am a little nervous about taking any meds I do not have to take.  I am reluctently taking zetia for cholesteral, and about to give up on it.  It does not really seem helpful.  I know when I was doing treadmill regular, I got my numbers down.  I just need to get in a routine and do the treadmill again.  It is hard when your knee hurts, but I have tried doing it slow 2 mph and I made it ok, and it affected my bs numbers positive.  Again, thanks for the encouragement.  Cooperazi

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 2/20/2007 7:47 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi Cooperazi, as you know keeping active with exercise is very important, so keep on trying with the walking or swimming or biking if you can do that.  The foods that you mentioned raise my numbers a lot, so I can't eat grapes or popcorn - or, rather, if I do it's only very little and always with other food.  Something that I found that is effective for me is that when I have crunchy vegetables with dinner (like in a salad or raw or lightly sauteed), my morning numbers are low.  That is, low for me, in the 80's or 90's.  For example, a typical dinner for me would be half a chicken breast and a sauteed combination of maybe 3 of these vegatables:  onions, bell peppers (all colors), zucchini, eggplant, broccoli, green beans, cauliflower.  I lighty saute them with either canola or olive oil or Smart Balance.  I also much on radishes and cilantro on the side whether I have a green leaf salad or not.  I've gone through a LOT of radishes lately!  You might want to check the food lists for their glycemic index and go for the low ones.  I hope this helps.  I know our bodies might react differently during metabolism but it's worth a try. 

Lanie yeah


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 2/20/2007 1:56 PM (GMT -7)   
Cooperazi,

Please understand, I am not picking on you here, but you have an incomplete idea of how the food you eat affects your blood sugar and when. This is not easy to learn all at one time so bear with me.

1. Foods that have sugars present (fruits, cookies, candies, baked goods) raise the blood sugar quickly because the glucose or fructose crosses the intestinal barrier quickly and is dumped into the bloodstream right away. This causes the pancreas to secrete insulin to assist the glucose to enter the cells of the whole body to be used for energy. These foods are called high glycemic index foods.

2. Starchy foods that have carbohydrate molecules readily available because they are highly refined or naturally present include potatoes, white rice, bread, pasta, tortillas, corn, sweet potatoes, yams and all sugar-free cakes and cookies. These foods raise blood sugar less quickly than #1 foods but often raise it much higher for much longer because the starch is often in a concentrated form and we tend to consume large portions of it. A good example is an ear of sweet corn. Next summer cut the kernels off of the cob and see just how much corn is on one ear. It will shock you... The carbohydrates in starchy foods are converted into glucose, just like the sugary foods above. This is what makes sugar-free foods so misleading. We have to look at the total carbohydrates present, not just the sugars. Also, modern milling processes in food production strip away the bran and germ of the grains and grind the starch into a fine paste to produce pasta and flour for breads and baked goods. This process mechanically removes the natural barriers present in grains and expose the carbohydrates to digestive enzymes very quickly making absorption into the blood stream very fast as well. This leads to a spike in insulin production and actually can lead to an increase in appetite if too much insulin is present in the blood stream. (This is why restaurants feed you bread before a meal. It actually stimulates your hunger.)

3. Whole grains that are left mostly intact (so you can actually see oats, barley, wheat, brown rice grains) must be physically broken down by the digestive tract with mechanical and enzyme activity. This takes a while so the body can only access some of the grain at one time as it passes through the digestive tract. Also, some seed coats are thicker than others and it takes time for the body to get through the cell walls, break down the carbs and transport it to the intestinal wall to the blood stream. For the coarser grains, they often pass almost undigested thru the intestines, showing up in the stool as whole grains. These foods may show up as high carbohydrate but the amount of fiber barrier present doesn't allow the body to get at all the carbs.

4. Vegetables can be high in sugar (carrots, beets, onions) and still be very good for you because of their high vitamin content. Again, the way that they are presented in the colon will make a difference on how quickly they are absorbed. Foods like brocolli or cabbage are very fibrous so they take quite a long time to present their carbs in the intestines if eaten raw. This slows down the after meal spike of these foods and makes them ideal to curb hunger as well as aid in moving things right along in the GI tract.

5. Fats slow the emptying time of the stomach and also delay food's absorption until the 'detergents' present in bile from the gall bladder break them down. This is why fatty foods make you feel full very fast. Fats have very little effect on blood sugar.

6. Proteins have little effect on blood sugar as well. They have a high satisfaction factor if eaten with fat and make you feel contentedly full. This is why cheese, steak, bacon, eggs, fish and whole milk are all very filling foods and also good for you in moderation.

7. Vitamins and minerals are sometimes missing in diabetic's food plan so it's often wise to take a supplement. Most store brands are certified and well absorbed.

8. Exercise burns available glucose and also can make the muscles ask for more glucose. This causes the liver to convert glycogen (a concentrated form of stored food calories) to glucose and inject it into the bloodstream. This effect can happen many hours after the exercise. This is why constant testing of your blood sugar doesn't give you the whole picture. You can be showing high glucose from foods you ate two hours ago or high glucose because of your muscles' need for energy. Also, since the brain runs on pure glucose and doesn't really care about the rest of the body it will force your liver to dump glycogen at the slightest hint of low blood sugar. Unfortunately, if you are resistant to your own insulin you will have all this nice glucose running around in the blood stream unable to get into the cells because it's the insulin that works as a passcode to get the glucose thru the cell membrane. This is where the medications often are helpful. Many of them make your body recognize its own insulin much better so your body uses your insulin to feed your cells. This drops blood sugar levels to normal and the brain, cells and liver are all happy as clams.

I wish this were easier to explain, but you need to understand how the metobolic functions of the body work to figure this whole thing out... Or you could just get a book that spells it out for you and follow a plan. Hope this helps.
~ Jeannie
Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class!
Yours may be one of them...

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 2/20/2007 5:10 PM (GMT -7)   

Jeannie, you're an angel for being patient and spending a lot of time writing up these guidelines.  Thank you so much for keeping us on track.

Lanie


cooperazi
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 47
   Posted 2/21/2007 12:09 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Jeanie,  That was a very good post.  I am going to print it out and I thank you for taking the time to type it.   I would never think you are picking on me, you are much too sweet.  I know you are here to help others.  I came here to learn, and then perhaps help others one day myself. My numbers, (other than my moring wake up) were good today, at least I think they were.  Had some 90's then my after supper number was 125.  I made a good choice while eating out with grandson.  Went to Chilli's restaraunt, at first was going to have the chicken dinner, not bad really, but it did come with the mashed potatoes, and then I changed my mind and asked for the salad, it had chicken and then I had a three sprareribs (small) and a piece of my grandsons quesidilla (just seem to have to have some of that carb!)  It paid off with the 125 after meal number.   I also did not eat the whole salad, just half.  That is also something I am working on, portion size.   I guess I can try to get it even lower, but my doctor told me my target was 140 after meals, so that 125 was inline with that target.  Something you said about the fats not affecting the blood sugar, I have a question.  Why is it I can eat mashed potatoes, and if I do not have other carbs, like bread, my numbers can be good.  However, if I have french fries, or even fried chicken compared to grilled chicken my numbers go high?  I definately see what you mean about the other carbs such as bread, rice, and popcorn.   If I understand you correctly, they not only raise the bs, but they keep the numbers up.  I guess that is why athletes are told to eat such things before competition, correct???  That is the only time I seem go low, is when I exericise, or a few times when I am out and about and do not eat for long periods of time.  Also, sometimes I can eat my oatmeal, blueberries, and have a good number, then othertimes, I eat my oatmeal and my numbers go high.  But I still eat the oatmeal because I know it is good for me, and you are right, they do not stay high for long.  Sorry long winded post.  Thank you again,Cooperazi
PS  I had to laugh about the sugar free cookies!  I was going to get one tonight after dinner and take home with me, but they were closed when we got there.  Now when I go, I will ask if they have a nutrition read out for their cookies. 

cooperazi
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 47
   Posted 2/21/2007 12:19 AM (GMT -7)   

Lanie, Thanks for your reply.  Yes I am going to try to keep up the exercise on the treadmill, even at only 2 mph it helps.   You sound like you are really disiplined with your food Lanie.  Mine, is still day by day, and sometimes minute by minute struggle, to eat it or not to eat it LOL.  I have been having some victories lately, so each day with good numbers is a gain, right?  Take care, Cooperazi


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 2/21/2007 7:30 AM (GMT -7)   

You're right, Cooperazi.  It's all about numbers and for me having the glucose monitor makes it easier to keep on track.  Instant feedback.  Also for me, fear is a great motivator because my mom died at 73 with complications of diabetes.  I printed out food lists according to their glycemic index divided into 'free' foods, 'good' foods, 'limited' and 'don't-eat-these' and posted them on the side of the refrigerator, so my shopping lists and meals are pretty much guided by the lists.  We've always had meals that included fresh vegetables (or frozen or canned) mostly because of the added ingredients like hydrogenated oils, salt, sugar, etc in foods out of the box.  I don't buy any sauces that are pre-made in jars or in packets.  I make them fresh.  And this was before having to monitor my blood sugar, so the transition was easy for me except for the cutting out of bread for breakfast and at meals.  And another good habit is keeping a food journal so I know what meals or kinds of food are reponsible for what numbers.  I thought I could keep it all in my head but I couldn't, so I printed out my own chart on which I can record meals and numbers.  (I didn't like the little booklets that I was given.)  Approaching it this way has also helped me understand how I'm affected by certain foods, etc.  I think I'm doing it this way because I'm a teacher and I like to be organized.  I guess what I would say to you is to follow what Jeannie's posting says and be organized in how you choose your food.  You're excercising and monitoring your blood sugar already, so you're on the right track!  yeah

Lanie


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 2/22/2007 12:26 PM (GMT -7)   
One thing I want to make clear is that the blood sugar lowering results from exercise can happen anywhere from immediately - to up to 48 hours after the exercise. Blood glucose rises can show up from 15 minutes to many hours after food intake so it's not always easy to judge exactly what is causing the rise or drop in numbers. This is why the standard is for most peeps to check sugars upon awakening (at least an 8 hour fast), pre-dinner or pre-lunch, and two hours after a meal. This will give some guidelines for you and your plan in finding patterns.

Also, you are right, keeping a food, meds, supplements and exercise journal is really helpful in pinpointing which foods and exercise are having the most impact on your individual health plan. Everyone's body is different and each person's metabolism is regulated by a number of factors including your muscle mass, thyroid function, exercise regimen and heredity. Moderation is the key to success and being kind to yourself is the easiest way to do this. Stringent rules and rigid schedules for most Type 2's often lead to a period of rebound where it's easy to just goof up, miss lost foods and throw in the towel. Been there, done that and could make a million selling the T-shirts if it was allowed on this site tongue ! Sometimes the best course of action for people is to only have 1/2 piece of toast in the morning with their breakfast (so they don't feel deprived) rather than never eating bread. For others, that 1/2 piece of toast will act as a trigger to eat the whole loaf of bread. For myself I find that choosing to spend my carbs on quality, yummy foods adds to my quality of life.

I make my own high fiber bread in a bread machine. I have a covered container about the size of a bucket. It's filled with all kinds of grains, flours and cereal-type stuff. I have put in it rye flour, whole rolled oats, rolled barley, bulgar wheat, cracked wheat, wheat germ, cream of wheat cereal (dry, from the box), spelt, and just about anything else that resembles a ground grain. I call this "horfenfiberchunks" and put about 1/2 to 3/4 cup of it in my bread recipe in place of some of the bread flour. It makes a delicious whole grain bread that shows less impact on my glucose than regular store bought bread and is inexpensive to make, about 15ยข a loaf. I also use olive oil in place of the shortening asked for because it is a monounsaturated fat and better for me and I LOVE olive oil. I slice the bread and keep it in the freezer because it has no preservatives and I only use about two slices a day. This works for me. This would be a pain to someone with very little time or no bread machine. I just like people to do what works best for them.
~ Jeannie
Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class!
Yours may be one of them...

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 2/27/2007 8:58 PM (GMT -7)   
bump for the newcomers...
~ Jeannie
Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class!
Yours may be one of them...

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


Beau2006
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 387
   Posted 2/28/2007 9:57 AM (GMT -7)   

Jeannie< I would also like to thank you for your post - it was excellent.

There are times when I will test before I eat, and this reading will be higher than what it is after I eat. This is generally at supper time.

I guess from what I read on your post, is that the readings could be lower after I eat then before, due to what I have eaten throughtout the day before supper, what the activity level was even a day or two before the reading, etc.

So I guess I should not be overly concerned that the reading is lower after I eat then before I eat.  This does not happen every supper, and I have never thought back about eating patterns or activity level of that day or the day before.

I never have high sugar levels, just sometime low blood sugars, so is it safe to say that I should not be overly concerned about this pattern as long as the after reading does not fall below the norm?  Have you ever heard before where someones readings are lower after a meal then they were before the meal?

Thanks,

Gary

 


cooperazi
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 47
   Posted 2/28/2007 3:00 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Gary,  That happens to me frequently, especially in the mornings.  I usually have high morning fasting numbers 129 and up, and then if I eat they go down to the 120 or 140 or even in the high 90's, well within my goals.  Apparently, it has to do with your liver dumping the glucose into your system because of the bodys reaction of the body needing the glucose, and so by eating it stops the bs from increasing, and brings it down, I am not an expert, that has just been my experience and that is what I myself am trying to learn.  I have gotten up with high numbers, gotten on my treadmill,  without eating breakfast, hoping the number will go down in response to exercise, only to find it went UP!  Today is a good example.  I had great morning number 117, ate my usual oatmeal, teaspoon of peanut butter, (I do not have milk in my oatmeal) and some splenda.  Did my treadmill, and my bs was 141 at the two hour after meal time.  Now that was higher than usual, if for example my bs was 129, I eat the  oatmeal and do exericise, I have a 125 bs after.  So who knows?  I guess, the real test is when you take the three month test and find out what your averages have been, and if you have control over all.  The monitoring helps up toward those numbers.  I did bring mine down from 6.9 to 6.1, which was good, and now am working on bringing it lower.  Sorry for rambling, and I am sure Jeannie or Lanie will come along and give you some real good advise.  They are great and know what they are talking about.   I also am picking up some books from the library I ordered.  Have a great day.  Donna

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5392
   Posted 2/28/2007 8:13 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi Donna, thanks for the nice compliment but honestly I don't know anything more than you do!  Everything I've learned has been from Jeannie, this forum and everywhere I can find information.  And now, I've learned something from what you and Gary wrote about:  that numbers might be higher before meals and lower after.  And this makes sense to me because my numbers have been lower since I've been spreading my meals out throughout the day.  I mean, I'll eat a snack in between the meals and sometimes the snack is a leftover part of the previous meal that I saved for the snack.  I'm not sure if I explained that right.  Rather than three meals, I'll eat maybe five but the total quantity of food would be the same as the three meals.  It might mean putting bits in little plastic bags and eating them at school at breaktime. 

In a very strange way, having to monitor my blood sugar was the best thing that's happened to me.  Now, I can see clearly and quickly results of what I eat.  Before, it was once a year during my annual physical after which the doctor would say to watch my diet.   It's been a challenge but knowing I can always find information and help and encouragement on this forum is fantasitic.

Cheers!

Lanie

 


Beau2006
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 387
   Posted 3/1/2007 8:15 AM (GMT -7)   

Good morning, Cooperazi and Lanie... thanks for the info...I'm not sure that I totally understand this, but it is nice for me to know that things are acting "normal" to have a lower blood sugar after I eat then before.  I was concerned that if this was the case, it would continue to drop below where it should be, but I guess this is not the case,

Thanks and have a great day, Gary


cooperazi
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 47
   Posted 3/1/2007 10:43 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Gary, Although rarely have I dealt with low blood sugars, they do happen. There are symptoms of that, you feel kind of sick to stomache, sweaty, shakey, and there are other symptoms that may happen. I have read that sometimes you do not experience symptoms because your body sometimes gets used to it. They also can happen when you least expect it. It happened to me recently. I had done my treadmill, my bs that morning was as usual, but after the treadmill I sat down and I started feeling those yuck feelings. The shakey feeling and sick to my stomache. Well, I immediately tested myself, not really expecting low numbers, but I was going to check anyway, and yes they were low, 69 which is going hypo from what I understand. So the best course is to check your numbers and be safe. From all that I have read, going too low is more dangerous in the immediate than going high. High numbers are more dangerous over the long term of the disease (from what I am learning). Have a good day, Donna

Beau2006
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 387
   Posted 3/1/2007 11:16 AM (GMT -7)   

Thanks Donna.

As a note, I was taking Prevacid for stomach acid, and was taking it long term, which creates a whole bunch of health issues due to the fact that it takes away all stomach acids.  B12 needs acid in order to breakdown and get into the body.  With this, as I found out, I was not digesting my food properly, and with this, were missing out on a number of nutrients required.  I also learned that because of poor metabalism, Prevacid will actually cause low blood sugars.

So I have successfully been off Prevacid for over two weeks. It has taken almost up until now, but I have noticed that my blood sugars are not dropping as they were before, so mayb, just maybe I have solved this riddle.....

Have a good one,

Gary

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