New Guy needs advice

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Mac07
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 6
   Posted 2/23/2007 5:44 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi All, I'm new here, and pretty ignorant regarding DM. I am a 29 year old male, 198 pounds, in good shape and excercise often and regularly, but it looks as though I have DM despite this. I am an American in a 3rd world nation with limited access to medical care and proper food. I had the following symtoms without realizing what they meant:
frequent urination
exhaustion after most meals, and during most of the day
sometimes anxiety/nervousness after meals
irritable in the morning
difficult getting moving in the morning
Insane hunger during or after exercise
dizziness/confusion during or after excercise
circulation seems poor in my extrmities lately
sometimes headaches after food and or exercise
Sugary drinks (regular soda, Gatorade) mess me up
 
  I found a glucose meter, and upon waking one morning I tested myself and scored a 136. 2 days later I scored a 184. I did have a chance to speak to an MD about this briefly, but he pretty much told me to change my diet. This frustrated me, and I have ordered a Glucose meter from the internet so that I can at least provide a doctor with a log of my sugar levels. I have also begun to meticulously document my meals and snacks.
 
I know you guys have probably faced this condition for some time, and know all about it. Does it sound possible to any of you that I do in fact have diabetes? How much damage can hyperglycemia cause unchecked in 18 months? By the time I am back to civilization this is how long I think this will have gone on. I am pretty anxious about this, I have no idea what to expect. I guessed at diabetes after seeing an episode of Prison Break, and then checked the Internet for symtoms. The doctor didn't tell me that I did or did not suffer from DM. Maddening. Can any of you share some insight with me? Thank You!

4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 2/23/2007 6:55 AM (GMT -7)   

Welcome to our little club. While I'm certainly not a doctor, those fasting levels do certain sound consistent with diabetes! So do your symptoms. In any event, following the a diet suited for diabetics and a good exercise plan will help you immensely before you get back to civilization, so to speak.

Many here have MUCH more experience than I do with all this, but having gleaned MUCH from their posts I would recommend the following: small frequent meals/snacks that feature lean protein and veggies. Starchy foods spike bs including: white flour and potatoes, many fruits, sugar in ANY form. Personally, I can't touch a lot of things others can ... it's all so individual. Your new best friend will be that blasted meter. Test upon arising, before a meal, two hours after a meal, and at bedtime. Doing that will give you a pretty good idea of how different food works in your system.

Eat frequently in SMALL amounts. A handful of nuts is a GREAT snack!!! Your goal is to keep that bs consistent and happy.

Good luck!

Personally I'd love to hear how this goes for you. When my youngest graduates from  high school I would like to consider some opportunities abroad but am curious how diabetics do with that. I 'm a diet/exercise person so wonder if "healthy food" is available. I'm a teacher and am considering doing some sort of "Teachers Without Borders" type of thing.

Where are you now?

Good luck!

 


Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


Mac07
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 6
   Posted 2/23/2007 8:01 AM (GMT -7)   
4Sons,
 
 Thanks for your reply! I was afraid is sounded too much like DM. I have modified my diet using what info I could collect from the Internet. I am determined to finish my time here without interuption. I am probably in the worst place on the planet to be right now, SW Asia. Lovely bit of real-estate.
 
 I know of people with diabetes intentionally setting out for places like this. They go to amazing lengths to make it succesful. I know of one case where the individual brought 3 meters, 2 pumps, a portable battery powered minifrdge, 8 months worth of drugs, with a 5 month reserve supply at the nearest hospital. He was recognized by some agency for his tenacity. With planning and education I suspect that your boys would do quite well. One of the greatest benefits of working here is the persepctive it lends. Your sons will most likely NEVER complain about life in the UK again!
 
In terms of food, is peanut butter a no go, or is it a "good" food? In regards to sugar, just about everything seems to have it these days. I started eating these granola bars that have 11g each, do you think these would be detrimental?
 
 One of my major concerns is the damage this may be causing my body, do you think 18 months is too short of a period for this to cause damage? I don't anticipate getting any real medical attention for about 4 months.
 
Thank You for your kind advice. Take Care, 
 
Mac
 
 
 
 

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5408
   Posted 2/23/2007 9:00 AM (GMT -7)   

Here's my two cents and, like Ruth, I'm not a doctor but I'm controlling this with diet and exercise and have learned a lot by reading through the postings on this forum.  You might want to read back through some of them.  Knowing what your blood sugar readings are is the best first step in figuring out what and how much to eat.  As Ruth said, choose lots of vegetables with fish, lean meats and chicken.  Stay away from the starches like white rice, potatoes and breads or at least eat them in moderation if your blood sugar levels don't rise to dangerous levels.  Get some exercise in like walking for about 20 minutes everyday.  When I lived in W. Africa and Iran, everyone ate rice everyday, sometimes twice a day.  If I'd been diabetic at that time, I would have chosen to eat only the meats and vegetables they served with the rice - and that's what I do now at home (US).  Luckily, those places didn't have processed food or cakes and cookies and candy everywhere you turned, so if where you're living has a pretty simple lifestyle, that's better than living amongst all the junk food we have here.  Natural peanut butter (no sugar and no salt) is good (and most nuts I think) in moderation.  You might use cinnamon with your food.  Some studies say it can help with blood sugar.  If you do eat a heavy meal even with the "good" foods, your blood sugar readings may be higher than you want.  Making your meals smaller but eating more frequently may keep the numbers in line.  You'll be able to figure out how to control the numbers when you see your readings.  And do keep a food journal so you know how certain food affects the readings.  Other members will be along soon, I imagine, with more expert advice.  Hang in there.

Lanie


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 2/23/2007 9:58 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Mac,
I'm Jeannie and I've had Type 2 diabetes for probably 30 years but was only diagnosed about 11 years ago. Set your mind at rest about the damage you can cause yourself and just take this one day at a time. This will lower your stress levels and enhance your blood glucose levels. The above advice about reading back in the posts will help you a lot. There's a ton of good stuff in 'them thar posts'. Plus, you can search by relevance by just reading the subjects of the posts.

Simple steps to take that will help a lot:
• Drink lots of water or non calorie drinks like tea (This helps the kidneys do their job more easily.) You might know when you are getting good blood sugar control because your thirst may decrease.
• Eat simply. Protein and veggies, olive or peanut oil, nuts and cheeses (if you can find them)
• Limit your fruits to 1/2 cup portions at a meal and try to stay with Vitamin C fruits (example: Pears are useless!)
• A serving of meat should be about the size of a deck of cards.
• A serving of starch is 15 gms. This is about 1/2 cup of rice, 1 slice of bread, 1/2 cup of pasta or noodles. Most men need at least 2500 to 3000 calories a day to keep going. Visit this wibsite

Men's Nutrition Guide for more detailed information.

A word of caution! Start testing every morning if possible. You may not have type 2 diabetes but instead may be developing type 1. If you follow your diet very carefully and don't see a drop in blood glucose readings you should see a doctor. Untreated Type 1 diabetes can be fatal. We aren't doctors and can't diagnose you over the net, so use your head and get help if you need it. ( I would recommend visiting a different doctor. tongue )
~ Jeannie
Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class!
Yours may be one of them...

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


Booyah
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 2/23/2007 10:09 AM (GMT -7)   
You are on the right track. I did not have any of those symptoms and I found out with a regular check up. Two times running, the Doc told me that I should watch my sugar intake, exercise and diet to lose about 30 pounds. I am trying and after only 15 days of taking my Glucose levels, I am frustrated with the readings. Keep on checking with your meter and watch the sugars.

Booyah
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 2/23/2007 10:16 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi,
I am 65 and started taking my Glucolse levels 15 days ago. I am disappointed in the readings as they are all over the map, from 212 to 133. I have been dieting for the 15 days but it seems to have no affect on the blood sugar. WhY??? Why do I get this range of numbers from my machine? It is frustrating since I have reduced my sugar intake significantly and also dieting. Lots of green veggies, almost no bread and some fruits during the day. Any suggestions??

4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 2/23/2007 10:43 AM (GMT -7)   
Booyah, huh? Is THAT how it's spelled? LOL -

When I started all this a couple of years ago it did take awhile for my bs readings to settle down. But when I had a new A1C a month after it all started I had dropped a 1.0 which really pleased my doctor.

Just do it. Watch the fruits as Jeannie said ... I learned about fruits the hard way. I was eating an apple every day mid-morning and could NOT understand why my numbers were higher than I expected. Uh, duh ... I was doing myself in with that bloody healthy apple!

Can you find low carb wraps to use instead of bread? That's been another life saver for me.

OH ... I just found this online and was going to post it here for all my buds.

http://www.carb-counter.org/

Booyah.

That's a classic.
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 2/23/2007 1:07 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi Mac,

Ok, for what its worth you are on the LOW end of the scale for diabetics.  Yes, you definately did the right thing by ordering in a meter and thinking about doing testing every day (right now the most important number for you is that number right after you get up in the morning). 136, thats not so bad.  185, thats worse but not like 250 or 350 which is what most full blown type twos can run unmedicated in the morning.  Now don't get me wrong, 185 means there is definately something wrong but what Im telling you is that if you really tend to run around 130-140 in the morning, there is probably a very good chance that with religious diet and exercise you can get your numbers back into a "good" range. 

However if you are averaging around 185 most mornings, the diet and exercise will help, but you are probably gonna need some medicinal help to get back to normal. If this is the case, Metformin is a fairly common drug in most 3rd world countries and probably available in most clinics to you.  This is the "beginning" diabetic drug for most people and the one that right now will probably help you the most.  A dose of 500mg twice a day is a good beginning dose that shouldn't hurt you a bit but should help you immensely.  You can even buy this over the internet and have it shipped to where you are and its very very inexpensive.

Now, as to what can happen if you go unchecked/untreated for 18 months??  Well, if your at the "185" or higher level, things will get progressively worse.  At this level, diet and exercise aren't going to control your diabetes and it WILL get worse.  How bad can it get?  In 18 months you can start to suffer nerve damage in your feet, possibly do some damage to your kidneys and definately lay some serious foundations for heart disease as well as do some damage to your retina's. Yes, all this can happen in 18 months, so even if you have to self medicate, I've given you a good starting point for being in a 3rd world country.  If you do decide to self medicate (and this would be ONLY because you can't get to a Doc in the country where you are), make sure you go to one of the internet sites and read the warnings and side effects for Metformin. MOST people tolerate it extremely well, but best to know what your playing with. Hope this helps.  Feel free to ask questions in this forum and if you don't have access to a Dr., we will try to help you make with your decisions!

scool Warren

Booyah
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 2/23/2007 1:44 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for the info. I just ate a healthy pear. I guess my numbers will be up in the AM AGAIN!!

I am already doing the high fiber breads, no potatoes or pasta. NO sugar!!! to speak of either.

Can you drink wine? A little?

Mac07
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 6
   Posted 2/23/2007 2:19 PM (GMT -7)   

Wow, thanks guys. I appreciate all of the advice and tips. To celebrate I ate wheat toast and cream cheese followed by granola! Did I get my snack right? I even integrated cinammon!

So, it sounds as though I may be in the low range, which makes me hopefull, and I am glad I did the right thing ordering a meter. That makes me feel more confident.I am doing measurement and statistical work in my present position, so whichever doctor gets my data is in for it!

Now that I know what I am facing, there must be a psychosomatic element to this, because now I am getting close to blacking out during excercise, something I most certainly did NOT experience previously. Feels similar to when you jump up suddenly from a seated or reclined position.

I have a question for you knowledgeable MedHeads: Is tingling/burning of the extremities a function of neuropathy, or is it related to circulation? The second symptom I identified was a marked decrease in circulation to my hands and feet, noticeable during excercise and at night. They "tingle" just like when you fall alseep on your hand the wrong way at night, or such. Is circulation to the extremities compromised in diabetics? Is this why amputations occur?

Last nutty question, are there any SCUBA enthusiasts here that dive despite their condition?

Thank You all again for your excellent commentary. You have informed me, and even put me a bit at ease. I appreciate that.

 

 

 


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5408
   Posted 2/23/2007 9:25 PM (GMT -7)   
Feeling dizzy or light headed could be low blood sugar but it could also be a drop in blood pressure.  Have you checked that as well?  However, the tingling might also be related to diabetes and that's why having a doctor check this all out is important.  Do you sit for long periods of time at a desk or in front of a computer?  Could be lack of circulation causing the tingling?  Could you take a leave of absence or sick leave and go to a doctor you trust, even in another city, to have it checked more thoroughly?  In the meantime, if you check your blood sugar when you're feeling faint and find it low, you might drink some OJ or have something with sugar.  Don't skip meals and try to eat from the diet that Jeannie responded with and that you can get from this forum and other places online.  Try to keep your blood levels constant with smaller frequent meals.  If you get light headed during exercise, it's not a good idea to go SCUBA diving, it seems to me!  Stress can raise blood sugar levels but controlling stress is hard sometimes when you have no control over your environment.  Lastly, be careful of granola 'anything' (cereal, bars...) because it usually contains a lot of fats (including transfats) and a lot of sugar.  Honey is sugar.  The granola might have a lot of dried fruit and that has sugars, too, so granola might not be the best snack for someone who has hyperglycemia even though it sounds like a health food snack.  There are lists you can find online of glycemic values of food and it's probably a good idea to check the lists out and see which foods have a high glycemic idex, so you can stay away from them.  Some people respond well to pairing up starches and proteins.  Good luck.  I'm sure there'll be others more knowledgeable giving you more information.
 
Lanie

AMM
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 234
   Posted 2/24/2007 8:56 AM (GMT -7)   
Your symptoms with exercise do not sound psychosomatic at all. They honestly sound like low blood sugar to me. You should check your blood sugar before exercising. If your blood sugar is on the low side you should eat a snack first. Then test afterward and see what it is. Normal range is 80-120. If you are closer to the 80 end of it, eat a little snack. If you are feeling those symptoms and are under 80 take a little oj.
What doesn't kill you makes you stronger.  Shouldn't I be invincible by now?


Warren
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 534
   Posted 2/25/2007 12:50 AM (GMT -7)   
The tingling/burning sensation is almost surely the first signs of neuopathy. As the nerves begin to die you get this sensation, sometimes more pain, sometimes just numb spots. Unfortunately its not reversable, but if you do get your sugars under control you can halt its progress. Circulation problems like PAD, etc. are another ball park alltogether and usually have very different symptoms, however, they too are most certainly a side effect of uncontrolled blood sugar over a longer period of time!

scool Warren

Mac07
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 6
   Posted 2/25/2007 6:28 AM (GMT -7)   

What an insidious evil little disease. My God, to think that this is caused by one of the most simple compounds found everywhere in nature. What has gone wrong in our evolution to allow such catastrophic damage to befall us? You would imagine that after millions of years of evolution that our bodies would have a backup pathway to deal with this sort of thing.

 I have been reading, and it appears as though the reasons for diabetes are as varied as its symptoms. Inoculations seem to be a popular suspect. Boy do we get plenty of those; 6 different Anthrax vaccinations, smallpox, MMR, Rubella, Annual Flu, Hep, all of the standard childhood Vac's, and not to mention daily doxycycline for the last 13 months to protect against Malaria. Or Mefliquine weekly.

 If we are doing this to ourselves to protect against common disease, that is just so ironic. Where are the hard federal studies on this pandemic, anyhow? Shouldn't this be National Objective #1 if so many Americans are at risk? I see that even the Chinese are now recognizing this killer as well. No doubt all developed nations have a head start given our ample food supplies and couch potato lifestyles.

And in researching the treatment options, in almost 100 years what great technological leaps have we made? Aerosolized Insulin that damages the lung. Wow. We put men on the moon, robots on Mars, eradicate Polio, Small Pox, and crush 12 cancers, but we are still injecting Insulin. How about monitoring? 10 sticks a day? Ridiculous. We can send cameras through a human digestive track and diagnose illness. We can monitor oxygen saturation with lasers, but we cannot develop an implant that can measure and transmit glucose levels in real time? No laser that can penetrate skin and measure levels? This is a conspiracy. What other diseases or conditions cause such widespread systemic damage? Sure, they are out there, but what the heck? Who are we, mud?

This is sad for so many reasons. Did our bodies betray us, or did we betray our bodies? It’s nice to see the benefits of 10 mile runs at 5 am, healthy eating habits, abstaining from tobacco and alcohol, and just generally taking care of my body. For what? For the chance to die blind without sensation in my fingers? Of a heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, pancreatic cancer, what else? I'm sure there are a dozen other ways.

 I tell you, this might be a rare opportunity for you veterans out there to see how a new guy responds to his diagnoses. I don’t know what I would do if I was not married. I can’t even tell my wife about this until I can get back to the US in 4 months, she doesn’t deserve the stress. Probably pursue some dangerous lifestyle like bull fighting, skydiving, or becoming a Republican and move to California. I think this is what is known as the "Anger" phase of acceptance, agreed? How can humans be so strong and adaptable, and yet so very fragile at the same time? The very same molecule that makes is killing us. Life is killing us. Is this not profound? Carbon Hydrogen and Oxygen.

Boy do I owe you guys for having to read this. I have no one I can vent to as this condition will effectively end my career, so you guys are it. I do appreciate it. All I can offer in return is support in those areas that I am competent to comment on. Thank You.

 


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5408
   Posted 2/25/2007 10:41 AM (GMT -7)   

Wow, Mac, sort of hard to reply to your last post.  If there's no way for you to leave early to come home, then the bottom line for you at this point since you're going to be there for 4 more months is to watch your diet and exercise.  It sounds like you're obviously already doing the exercise.  Keep measuring your blood sugar and adjust your diet if you can if your numbers are high.  Stick to fish, chicken and low-fat meats and lots of vegetables.  Drink lots of water or unsweetened tea.  Have smaller portions at meals; smaller but more frequent meals.  If there isn't much meat there, eat some beans but not in large quantities as they might raise the readings.  I think you'd said you were keeping a food journal so you'll know what food/meals give what numbers.  You're probably through with vaccinations except maybe gamma gobulin and taking the malaria medicine.  Don't skip the malaria medicine.  (I did and malaria is not a pretty illness.)  I'm not sure how you can deal with stress but it can raise your numbers.  Since you can access the Internet, you've got lots of infomation in your hands.  Good luck and stay well. 

Lanie


Mac07
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 6
   Posted 2/25/2007 1:51 PM (GMT -7)   
lanieg,

Thanks. I know it was angry... I am angry. You are showing your spots mentioning Gamma!

Is meat the worst thing we can eat? Is fat or Carbs the devil wih this illness? I think I can work around the food thing pretty well, there is enogh that I can get what I need, with maybe only an occasional shortage.

I am feeling marketdly better after just under 2 weeks of dieting, and being careful that I excercise like I am supposed to. I notice headaches go away after excersising. I am also less irritable after working out. I have cut out all sugar (except the unavoidable type).

I see a difference taking all of your advice. I hope that I can halt this through diet and excercise.

Does alcohol pose any special risks for hyperglycemia?

Thanks for reading my rant, I know it came off strong!

sad

4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 2/25/2007 3:45 PM (GMT -7)   
Hey Mac ...

Of course you're angry. We're all angry or have been. Ever read Elisabeth Kubler-Ross' stages of dying? It's a lot like that. Somewhere Jeannie has a post on it. Too true.

Carbs are the enemy ... and they play dirty.

I have read that alcohol can really lower one's bs ... so drink carefully with that in mind.
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5408
   Posted 2/25/2007 8:06 PM (GMT -7)   

Oh hey Mac, you have lots of reasons to be angry, I'm sure.  Carbohydrates are what raise the blood sugar to bad levels.  So, breads, cakes, white rice, potatoes will do that.  Even different fruit has different glycemic values and that's why you need a list of the glycemic index of foods.  You can Google for lists.  If you do eat any carbs, be sure to also eat proteins like meat, chicken or fish or even peanut butter (the natural kind with no sugar).  That's supposed to "balance" the carbs.  (I wishe that worked for me but it doesn't.)  Honey is natural sugar and will raise the b.s. levels, too.  Whole grains in bread or cereal have fiber which is good even though they're carbs but it takes the body awhile to process them, so shouldn't cause high spikes - but you will know how your body reacts to different food because you're monitoring your blood sugar.  If you're eating any processed food from mixes, boxed food, etc,  check out the carbs and sugars on the package.  Processed food has so many additives, so it's better to prepare the food fresh yourself.  Rather than 3 big meals a day, try to spread the food out at maybe 4 or 5 different times.  If you eat a really huge meal of "good" food, you b.s. might still end up high only because of the quantity you eat.  A glass of wine with dinner is supposed to be ok.  I don't know about beer or hard liquor.  (And, hey, I remember those gamma shots.  You know if you stand on the opposite leg when you get the shot in the other side, it's not supposed to be as bad.) 

Take care and just be methodical with what you eat while you're there.

 Lanie

 


AMM
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 234
   Posted 2/26/2007 4:46 AM (GMT -7)   
I don't know how you will take this coming from a Republican. LOL When you look on your labels you want to look for the grams of total carbohydrate.  That is going to be more important than the grams of sugars.  There are 15 grams of carbohydrate in a carb serving.  I hope that helps you.
What doesn't kill you makes you stronger.  Shouldn't I be invincible by now?


4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 2/26/2007 5:53 AM (GMT -7)   
Uh ... not for Democrats or Libertarians there aren't.

LOL -
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


AMM
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 234
   Posted 2/26/2007 11:23 AM (GMT -7)   
And here I thought diabetes was non discriminatory.
What doesn't kill you makes you stronger.  Shouldn't I be invincible by now?


N17
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 87
   Posted 2/26/2007 7:22 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi Mac

 

If you can get a hold of it, long grain rice has got a much lower GI (glycemic index, a measure of the effect of carbs on your bs levels) than the normal stuff.  Thank heavens for that as my wife makes a great chicken curry!!  There are quite a few fruits you can eat that have a low GI too, although I know that GI is not the be-all and end all.  GL (glycemic load. GI x carb) is another useful gauge.  Where you are, you probably won't see anything with a GI number, but if you do, below 55 is low, 56-75 is intermediate and above 75 is high.  There are loads of sites that can give you more of an idea.  Any grained bread is better than white or even brown.  If you ever make down and to the right of where you are (to the Western shores of Australia), I'll buy you a (really neat) low carb beer!  Any info that might be more local to our area that you might need, let me know.  Otherwise, you've have come to exactly the right place. Great advice from those that know.  The people on this board rock! 

 


"I love Italian.......and so do you"
"Yes"  -  Star Trek 4
 
Brian (Type 2 NIDDM).
 
N17 is the postcode for the London suburb of Tottenham.
Tottenham Hotspur is the greatest football team in the world!
 
...and Go Bengals! and the Cardinals!  and the Leafs!
 


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 2/27/2007 3:12 PM (GMT -7)   
I believe that N17 means brown rice, not long grain rice...

Mac- I can tell from your posts that you haven't had a chance to read back much in the previous stuff here online. I'll give you the condensed version. Diabetes is probably an adaptation by humans to handle famine. Increased carbs presented to the body actually raise insulin resistance and cause our bodies to store fat. Increased fat amounts raise insulin resistance even higher. Exercise lowers insulin resistance and lowers fat stores... Hmmmm... Notice anything?

As our lives require less physical energy output to maintain our food supply or lifestyle we must learn to eat less food than our appetites think we need. Improvements in health care have lead to diabetics being able to reproduce more little diabetics (instead of dying in childbirth). We are basically victims of our own progress. This is why we have to pay to exercise at a gym...

BTW, welcome to HealingWell.
~ Jeannie
Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class!
Yours may be one of them...

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross

Post Edited (Jeannie143) : 2/27/2007 8:27:22 PM (GMT-7)


N17
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 87
   Posted 2/27/2007 7:32 PM (GMT -7)   
Jeannie143 said...
I believe that N17 means brown rice, not long grain rice... (LOL)!
I might be missing something here but a rule of thumb according to health people here (in Australia) is that long grain rice has a lower GI than normal white or even brown rice.  Some examples from the Shopper's Guide to GI values 2006 (I appreciate that brands might not be the same in different countries but you get the idea):
 
Rice                                  GI
 
Long grain rice Mahatma       50
 
basmati white                     58
 
Doongara rice white             56             
 
Sun Rice arborio risotto white 69
 
Calrose brown, medium grain  87
 
Broken Thai rice white          86
 
Brown Pelde rice                  76
 
Calrose brown medium grain   87
 
glutinous white rice               98
 
Instant rice white                87
 
Jasmine rice white long grain  109  (the exception!)
 
Sunbrown quick rice             80
 
 
The lowest rating brown rice listed (I haven't listed all rices shown in the guide) has a score of 66, the rest are in the high GI bracket.  Of course, different countries have different types of rice, but this is my local view :-) .
 
"I love Italian.......and so do you"
"Yes"  -  Star Trek 4
 
Brian (Type 2 NIDDM).
 
N17 is the postcode for the London suburb of Tottenham.
Tottenham Hotspur is the greatest football team in the world!
 
...and Go Bengals! and the Cardinals!  and the Leafs!
 

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