need some advice

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bhkhhh
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 245
   Posted 3/18/2007 12:10 PM (GMT -7)   
I'll try & make this short as possible. I have been ill for a yr now. I have terrible stomach pains docs like to call IBS but only mine hurts up in left rib area, nausia,dizziness, blurred vision, tachardia,chest rash ( which they have dx'ed as cutanious lupus ) back pain,feels like kidneys hurt. The list could go on & on. I have occasionally have had hypoglycemia for yrs off & on. Since I became ill I battle this continually now. I have to eat every 2hrs. I am a very small person though. 5'5' 117lbs. They have put me on diabetic diet,although I must admit I might sneak small amount of orange hi-c drink once a week. When my bs gets in the eight's I feel horrible. I have been reading posts & I see where my bs should be 72-126 even if I have ate. well after I eat mine is 164 but in 2hrs it will drop back to normal. Could this be diabetes? Do people have simular pains with diabetes. My doc has ran a glucose tolerance test which was a nightmare! I dropped to 38 & had to argue with nurses over it. I have been known to drop to 21, that time I thought I was dieing! I guess I basically could have.I allways thought it was normal to go up after you eat it was what you was 2hrs after. If some one could explain this to me it would help me.

4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 3/18/2007 2:49 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi,

I'm so sorry to hear you're not feeling well! I'm certainly not a doctor but based on your number of 164 and an A1C of 8 I'd say you were a definite diabetic. What does your doctor say about this? It IS normal for your bs to go up after eating, but 164 is definite "trouble" in blood sugar heaven! You are small so they won't recommend you lose any more weight! When was the last time you saw your doctor? Have you thought about getting another opinion?
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


bhkhhh
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 245
   Posted 3/18/2007 3:42 PM (GMT -7)   
You must have misunderstood me. I did do a1c but I do not remember the result. That is a lab they run to see how your bs has done over a period of weeks or months isn't it? I believe they told me mine was a 5 or 6, I'm really not sure but doc said it was fine. He did send me to rhuematologist suspecting sle (another type of lupus) but she says no, all labs looked fine except bs, it was low. I don't understand this because I ate well & even a snack before I went because I was afraid bs would go down on me. Is there other ways for him to check me without the glucose tolerance test. I am not willing to go through that again.

4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 3/18/2007 6:47 PM (GMT -7)   
I guess when you said you had blood sugars in the "8's" I was thinking A1C. Well, since you've been to a doctor and you didn't like what he said I guess I'd get a second opinion. But a glucose tolerance test is usually the definitive diabetes test. Maybe someone who knows more than me will pop in as well.

Good luck.
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


AMM
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 234
   Posted 3/19/2007 5:30 AM (GMT -7)   
Here was a very good explanation from Warren the last time you had concerns. It at least addresses the glucose tolerance test. I am not sure what you mean about you feeling terrible when your blood sugar is in the eights. Normal a1c is about 5 or 6 so if that is what yours was then that is good. The 164 is a little high, but you said in 2 hours it is back down to normal and that you have to eat every 2 hours to keep your blood sugar from going hypo. I don't think you would want to take any diabetes meds if you are having to eat to keep your blood sugar up. You should probably call your doctor.




Warren said...
Hi bhkhh,

I guess most people here don't really understand hypoglycemia, so I hope this helps.
Two types of hypoglycemia can occur in people who do not have diabetes: reactive (postprandial, thats after meals) and fasting (postabsorptive). Reactive hypoglycemia is not usually related to any underlying disease; fasting hypoglycemia often is.

So what are the symptoms??

Both types resemble the symptoms that people with diabetes and hypoglycemia experience: hunger, nervousness, perspiration, shakiness, dizziness, light-headedness, sleepiness, confusion, difficulty speaking, and feeling anxious or weak. Personally, I get shakey, and cold and I've learned that for me, this is an instant symptom my meds have pushed me into a hypoglycemic state.

If you are diagnosed with hypoglycemia, your doctor will typically try to find the cause by using laboratory tests to measure blood glucose, insulin, and other chemicals that play a part in the body's use of energy (just like in bhkhh's case).

Now lest's look at reactive hypoglycemia; here symptoms appear within 4 hours after you eat a meal. To diagnose reactive hypoglycemia, your doctor may

ask you about signs and symptoms

test your blood glucose while you are having symptoms (The doctor will take a blood sample from your arm and send it to a laboratory for analysis. A personal blood glucose monitor cannot be used to diagnose reactive hypoglycemia.)

check to see whether your symptoms ease after your blood glucose returns to 70 or above (after eating or drinking)
A blood glucose level of less than 70 mg/dL at the time of symptoms and relief after eating will confirm the diagnosis.

The oral glucose tolerance test IS NO LONGER USED TO DIAGNOSE HYPOGLYCEMIA; most doctors now know that the test can actually trigger hypoglycemic symptoms, so SHAME ON YOUR DOCTOR.


The causes of most cases of reactive hypoglycemia are still open to debate. Some researchers suggest that certain people may be more sensitive to the body's normal release of the hormone epinephrine, which causes many of the symptoms of hypoglycemia. Others believe that deficiencies in glucagon secretion might lead to hypoglycemia.

A few causes of reactive hypoglycemia are certain, but they are uncommon. Gastric (stomach) surgery, for instance, can cause hypoglycemia because of the rapid passage of food into the small intestine. Also, rare enzyme deficiencies diagnosed early in life, such as hereditary fructose intolerance, may cause reactive hypoglycemia.

To relieve reactive hypoglycemia, some doctors recommend:

eat small meals and snacks about every 3 hours

exercise regularly

eat a variety of foods, including meat, poultry, fish, or nonmeat sources of protein; starchy foods such as whole-grain bread, rice, and potatoes; fruits; vegetables; and dairy products

choose high-fiber foods

avoid or limit foods high in sugar, especially on an empty stomach
Now, some health professionals recommend a diet high in protein and low in carbohydrates (sound familiar to all you type 2's), but studies have not proven the effectiveness of this kind of diet for reactive hypoglycemia. I would think on the contrary that while great for those with hyperglycemia, it is NOT helping those with reactive hypoglycemia.

Now lets talk about the other type of hypoglycemia, FASTING HYPOGLYCEMIA.

Fasting hypoglycemia is diagnosed from a blood sample that shows a blood glucose level of less than 50 mg/dL after an overnight fast, between meals, or after exercise. Causes include certain medications, alcohol, critical illnesses, hormonal deficiencies, some kinds of tumors, and certain conditions occurring in infancy and childhood and the list goes on.

Now, here is the big surprise to most of you. Medications, including some used to treat diabetes, are the most common cause of hypoglycemia. Some other medications that can cause hypoglycemia include

salicylates, including aspirin, when taken in large doses

sulfa medicines, which are used to treat infections

pentamidine, which treats a very serious kind of pneumonia

quinine, which is used to treat malaria
Drinking, especially binge drinking, can cause hypoglycemia because your body's breakdown of alcohol interferes with your liver's efforts to raise blood glucose. Hypoglycemia caused by excessive drinking can be very serious and even fatal.

Some illnesses that affect the liver, heart, or kidneys can cause hypoglycemia. Sepsis (overwhelming infection) and starvation are other causes of hypoglycemia. In these cases, treatment targets the underlying cause.

Hormonal deficiencies may cause hypoglycemia in very young children, but usually not in adults. Shortages of cortisol, growth hormone, glucagon, or epinephrine can lead to fasting hypoglycemia. Insulinomas, insulin-producing tumors, can cause hypoglycemia by raising your insulin levels too high in relation to your blood glucose level. These tumors are very rare and do not normally spread to other parts of the body.

So now that you know a little more about the two types of HYPOGLYCEMIA, you can pinpoint which of the two you have and maybe even begin to zero in on some causative elements.

Under NO CIRCUMSTANCES should you let them give you another oral glucose tolerance test as that could very well send you into a diabetic coma. Hope this helps.

Warren
What doesn't kill you makes you stronger.  Shouldn't I be invincible by now?


bhkhhh
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 245
   Posted 3/19/2007 6:47 AM (GMT -7)   
I'm sorry I still don't think anyone understands. My bs has never been 8 it has been 21 & 38. I think I need to let my doc refer me to someone because I am tired of fighting this. Thank you all for responding. I guess the problem is I don't understand hypo-g & I don't think alot of doc's do. The strange thing is , is since gallbladder surgery this has been a battle. That may be be a good indication my gb did'nt need to come out. I have allways loved sugar & since this, any sugar at all really sets me into a spiral. I may not be diabetic but boy do I understand the battle you all fight. Thanks again!

4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 3/19/2007 7:59 AM (GMT -7)   
Perhaps there is a communication problem here.
 
You wrote:
 
>When my bs gets in the eight's I feel horrible.
 
What do you mean by that? To a diabetic that sounds like you're talking about an A1C ...
 
If you're not a diabetic and you feel horrible when you eat sugar, then I would recommend you don't eat it. I hope you are able to find a doctor who will be more helpful to you.
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


bhkhhh
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 245
   Posted 3/19/2007 8:50 AM (GMT -7)   
I'm sorry you see this is driving me nuts! I meant eighty's. I kept reading over my post & still could'nt find it!

gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 3/19/2007 10:48 AM (GMT -7)   
Being in the 80's is well within the normal range of 70-100  for non-diabetics.
 
Although I am a diabetic, my BG is now considered well-controlled. The usual range on my meter is between 78 and 96, my morning fasting number is between 80- and 95, and my most recent A1c was 4.9.  I usually don't have high pp readings because I follow the protein-carb link and balance approach to eating and it works well for me.
 
I do think you should print out Warren's previous reponse to you, circle all of the symptoms that you experience on a regular basis, and take it to a 2nd or even 3rd doctor. It's clear that you are suffering- Ruth's advice to avoid sugar is good for everybody- not just diabetics :-)   Good luck to you.
sandy


I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


Phishbowl
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 547
   Posted 3/19/2007 11:06 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi B...I think it may be time to have your doc refer you to a specialist that understands hypoglycemia & other metabolic issues. That doctor would be an Endocrinologist. Getting it under control (or at least to a point where you might understand it better), requires a doctor that specializes in this area and a good education, particularly about foods. I'm sure the first order of business would be for him to set you up with his Dietician or Diabetes Educator, who would help you understand your particular situation and what steps you need to take to manage your hypoglycemia.

Unfortunately, we don't have our professional team at our disposal 24/7 so, understand that you will be largely responsible for your care on an on-going basis, but given the right tools/plans/etc., you can have success in managing hypoglycemia. I've found (and still do after 2+ years), documenting everything I eat or inject and when, helps tremendously in spotting patterns with food, exercise, scheduling and more. It's also irrefutable data that doctors can't just ignore or chalk up to the patient's memory or perception.

It is hard to detect hypoglycemia in the earlier stages but, your concerns and your obvious experiences should dictate that you press to get that appointment with someone who knows this situation and not just accept what a GP tells you comes back as normal on a lab test. Don't walk away without a satisfactory course of action. Just my 2 cents.

Good luck and take care...
Cheers,
- Phishbowl (Type 1 since Jan'05 - Levemir, NovoRapid)
"What's Not Measured Is Not Managed"

"It is impossible for a man to learn what he thinks he already knows"-Epictetus

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