3 Questions: Diagnosed this week.

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Sweetguy59
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 4/13/2007 2:34 PM (GMT -7)   
I have been reading and researching for a few weeks and my blood tests confirmed what I thought yesterday, that I have Type II diabetes. I am working hard to lower my BG level with some success. It has lowered from an average reading of 250 (two weeks ago) to 150 (this week) without any medication. Today I started a new medication (Actoplus met). I have always been very active and a runner and I am not over weight, so I am not sure what more I can do other than increasing my workouts and changing my diet. Now for my 2 questions:
 
1) Has anyone on this forum been on this medication and how has it worked for you?
2) With hard work (diet and exercise) is there ever a chance to get off of the medication, or is this a permanent thing?
3) I read an onlinie article that stated that the cells become starved for energy because they cannot absorb the glucose in people with type II diabetes. If this is true, then is it correct to assume that the cells will continue to be starved, even if the glucose level is under control through diet? How would the cells be nurished even if I eliminate carbs in my diet?
 
I greatly appreciate any responses. I know it takes time and effort.
Sincerely,
Steve

Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 4/16/2007 9:41 AM (GMT -7)   
Steve,
With Type 2 diabetes the body has elevated blood sugar. This may be caused by insulin resistance where the body doesn't use its own insulin very well (so the cells are hungry) or it may be caused by inadequate amounts of insulin present for the amount of carbohydrates consumed. Exercise enhances insulin's ability to move across the cell membranes so you have that pretty much covered. Just my opinion here, but with the amount of exercise you normally do I'm thinking you have probably been heading for diabetes for a long time and have been holding it at bay with your running.

You may be one of the unlucky ones that will need meds for the rest of your life. Not everyone can beat this thing with diet and exercise (or herbals!) The difficult thing to wrap your head around is this: Regardless of whether you are on meds or not, exercising enough or not, on other meds for other conditions or not... You are diabetic. Whenever your blood glucose exceeds your body's ability to metabolize it your numbers will elevate. And in the end it's all about those numbers.

I know I'm a party pooper telling you this now but the sooner you hear it the sooner you can come to grips with it. Try to make the good numbers your goal, not the "getting off meds" idea. With the good numbers comes length of life, kidney health, eyesight, happy feet and less heart disease and stroke risk, not to mention less risk for e.d. in men.

As far as eliminating carbs goes, your body will convert fat or muscle into glucose if need be so if you have no fat on your body you may goof up your metabolism by switching to a no-carb food plan. Get ahold of your doctor's appointment person and get a class scheduled with a dietician if it's covered under your insurance. You can meet this thing head on with education. Also, start journaling your foods, blood sugars and exercise times. This will give your doctor and you some basic information to start with when making medication and food plan changes. The more information that you have to work with the easier this becomes.

Hang in there buddy. We will be here for you.
~ Jeannie
Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class!
Yours may be one of them...

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


Sweetguy59
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 4/16/2007 7:05 PM (GMT -7)   

Jeannie,

Thank you for the very thoughtful and educational reply. I have come to terms with this and I am trying to stay very positive. My goal is to do the best I can on a daily basis. I am nervous about the side-effects of  the meds, but I realize that if they remain necessary they are the less of the evils.

I appreciate your support and encouragement,

Steve


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 4/16/2007 8:49 PM (GMT -7)   
I understand your fears about side effects but not keeping sugars in control is far worse. My father-in-law lost his sight to diabetic retinopathy and died of a heart attack. My next door neighbor lost her lower leg, then the whole leg to diabetic vascular complications. She had a stroke and lingered for a few months before she died. I cared a lot for both of these dear people and their early and senseless deaths made a huge impression on me. Both of them were responsible in a way for contributing to their early deaths because they refused to come to terms with their disease, take their medications, follow their food plans and learn to cope. So if I come on strong or harsh please excuse my vehemence... I'm just frustrated at the toll that this disease takes on people whether they are ready or not.
~ Jeannie
Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class!
Yours may be one of them...

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 4/17/2007 2:27 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi Steve,

I was put on Acto+Met (15/500) 2X/day when I was first diagnosed. It takes Actos up to 6 weeks to really take effect. The metformin kicks in within the first week. There is plenty of information about Actos and its cousin Avandia on the Web. 

Actos was not a good drug for me. It caused me to gain 13 # in 13 days. I upped my exercise bike time to 1.5 hours(a day) and my toning/building to 1 hour ( every other day). My ankles swelled up until they were about the size of my head. I swear I could hear my legs swoosh when I walked they were so swollen. After about 25 days, I started to gain a pound a day again (another 7#). I called my doctor and told her I was done with it. She prescribed the metformin as a single drug ( I still take metformin).

Three weeks later I had lost all of htat weight and my ankles and legs were back to normal.

Good luck- hope this answers your drug related question.

sandy


I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


fergusc
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 230
   Posted 4/18/2007 3:47 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi Steve, welcome aboard!

Firstly, I'm type 1 diabetic so there's no propect of coming off medication for me although I do sympathise with your aims.

There's rarely a complete consensus on many health related issues, but I believe the real objective here is to try to normalise your blood sugars as far as possible. If you have success with that then you reduce the risk of further complications to its minimum. The question then is how best to achieve this? My belief and my experience tells me that if you maximise the benefit from diet and exercise, you minimise the need for medication, perhaps removing it completely if you're lucky (I know a number of people who've been able to achieve this).

I'm a runner too so I know how beneficial that is but I also follow a low carb diet which also makes a great difference. I avoid bread, pasta, potatoes etc and get most carbs from vegetables instead. It's not been easy but my sugars / weight / lipids are all good so it certainly works for me. I think the importance of starchy carbs in the context of distance running is over emphasised; avoiding them hasn't prevented me running full and half marathons and if anything I'd say I feel I have more energy rather than less.

I hope you find something that works for you.

All the best,

fergusc


4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 4/18/2007 3:17 PM (GMT -7)   
Another quasi-runner chiming in here!!! Last time I got some shoes I had a chat with the local running guru. I mentioned I was a diabetic and wondered, as a RUNNER, about all the carb talk. Was it going to be dangerous for me to run w/o the carb loading??? The answer was a long laugh, followed by a definitive "NO!" Carbs are highly over-rated. As Jeannie would tell you, if we lived when we literally worked our fingers to the bone every waking minute, then perhaps YES. But we don't. Those of us who run do so by choice. We're not running from some predator and we have the opportunities to eat well.

Here's to low/no carb running!!!
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


Sweetguy59
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 4/24/2007 7:12 AM (GMT -7)   

Thank you all for your words of encouragement. I intend to go the low carb runner route and hope for the best. I will have my A1C checked again on June 1st. I will keep you all posted.

This forum is great and I thank you all and especially the moderator. It helps a lot to have a place to go when this is all so new to me. I have known people in the past who have this disease but never understood much about it. I guess my main goal is to get to a point where this isn't on my mind 24/7.

Steve


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 4/24/2007 11:56 AM (GMT -7)   
Wow, Steve! When you get to that point will you help me with it? I'm either hungry, planning groceries, cooking, testing, eating, exercising or medicating every other hour of the day.... Of course, I'm a mom and a baker so that's part of the equation.... (LOL!)

One of my most difficult acceptance things was making my diabetes part of my background noise. Once I let it be present in my every day though process...
-remember to get out and walk every hour while driving
-keep hydrated and plan for potty breaks
-remember to not go more than four hours without a snack or meal during the day
-take the meds
-check the sugars
-buy the right foods
-make the right choices at each meal
-plan to succeed
I was ok. Before that I was just mad at the world. Good luck with your running. Be sure to check your feet with a mirror every day. The dumb thing with diabetes is that you can have peripheral vascular disease, even with good blood glucose numbers, and still lose a limb to infection complications. Take care.
~ Jeannie
Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class!
Yours may be one of them...

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross

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