My friend thinks her type 2 will disappear! How is that possible??

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

jkirkman
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 20
   Posted 4/27/2007 5:32 PM (GMT -7)   
I have a good friend who is seriously overweight and type 2 diabetic. She thinks if she just loses the weight that her diabetes will go away! I know this isn't true, though it would be nice if it was, wasn't it? I think her doctor lead her to believe this. Has anyone else been cured after losing weight?
 
Jennifer cool
 

Rhoda
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 55
   Posted 4/27/2007 7:02 PM (GMT -7)   

I don't know if it will actually disappear but it could become controlled by diet and exercise.  That is what our physician has stated anyway.

 Is she taking medication now?  Is she controlling her blood pressure and cholesterol also?

She is lucky to have a caring friend like you to help her through a very tough time ahead.


stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 4/27/2007 9:06 PM (GMT -7)   

Hello

I am Kitt

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, either the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin. Insulin is necessary for the body to be able to use sugar. Sugar is the basic fuel for the cells in the body, and insulin takes the sugar from the blood into the cells. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, it can cause two problems:

Right away, your cells may be starved for energy.

Over time, high blood glucose levels may hurt your eyes, kidneys, nerves or heart.

Finding out you have diabetes is scary. But it appears her Doctor is trying to start with the weight loss to control the blood sugars. Type 2 diabetes is serious, but people with diabetes can live long, healthy, happy lives.

I wish your friend the best. yeah


 
Respectfully
 
Kitt
 
Depression 25 years, Husband Crohns Disease 30 years
__________________________________________________ 
"If you doubt you can accomplish something, then you can’t accomplish it. You have to have confidence in your ability, and then be tough enough to follow through.”
Rosalyn Carter
 


jkirkman
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 20
   Posted 4/28/2007 7:06 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi:

Thanks for the replies there! My friend is currently on Metformin twice a day. Her A1C went up last time to 6.6. She needs to lose about 70 pounds and start eating right. I don't think she is doing a lot to control her cholesterol and she doesn't have high blood pressure. She also never tests very much, but I am trying to encourage her.

I told her just how serious my own type 2 was. I now take Byetta injections along with several pills to control it and still have high sugars sometimes-even with eating right. I test my sugars 6-8 times a day. I hope this will rub off on her!

Jennifer

gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 4/28/2007 12:06 PM (GMT -7)   
My doctor told me that type 2 diabetics who have bariatric surgery become non-diabetic. This is because the surgery causes them to lose enough weight to become normal weighted and their insulin resistance genereally decreases as their weight decreases. Their A1cs drop to non-diabetic levels too. This is true as long as their pancreas is not burned out. IN that case, they are unable to make enough insulin for their metabolic needs and they are reclassified as type 1, or 1.5 if their insulin resistance persists.
 
Maybe this is what your friend's doctor had in mind?
 
Some doctors tell you that once you cross the line into diabetes, you are always a diabetic no matter what. Maybe you enter a type of diabetes remission if you lose weight and change your lifestyle- but it's always there lurking in the background.
 
Based on the recent findings of multiple gene involvement in the development of diabetes, I'm tending toward believing the lurking in the background theory. If you have the genes, you have the genes. Diligence and adherence to a non-diabetes promoting lifestyle may help you to not cross the line. It's kind of like walking around with a loaded gun- you don't have to fire it.
 
good luck
sandy


I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


Ambug
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 4/28/2007 1:48 PM (GMT -7)   
Type 2 diabetes can be reversed. Dr.Neal Barnard has a new book out on how to totally reverse diabetes and even type 1's can also be helped.
Another great book to read is 'the china study'. Very informative.
I for one don't intend to take meds for the rest of my life so i am doing something about it. As it is now, i am borderline diabetic, but don't have it. Borderline high cholesterol and i have high blood pressure. I only take blood pressure lowering meds, but not for long. :-)

4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 4/29/2007 6:13 AM (GMT -7)   
Once a diabetic always a diabetic ... once a pre-diabetic always at LEAST a pre-diabetic. Our pancreas' are broken. BROKEN. We can help them function to our advantage, but they will always kick out higher reading if we "cheat." They are the bottom line.

I think the reversal people talk about is in our numbers. We DEFINTELY have a lot of control with our blood sugar numbers. But I can't see how any can say it can be reversed because of the pancreas. Diabetic pancreas' don't WORK normally.

Sandy, I"m sure it's genetic. I'm adopted and while I knew I was an "apple" instead of a "pear" I never even CONSIDERED diabetes as an issue for me down the road. I was a slim kid/teenager/and young adult. After my kids were born I was well within a healthy weight range, although I was not at my OWN personal best weight.

I was, hmmmmmm, diagnosed with hypoglycemia when I was around 12 and then told that sometimes the pancreas flip/flops in middle age. What does that mean to a 12 yr. old? Not much.

At 40 I found my birth family ... and when I asked for my medical history they mentioned heart issues, but no diabetes (believe me ... I asked). Ooooooo, if only I knew then what I know now. I'd have taken a good hard look at those photos and made a wager that they WERE diabetics (looking at all those bodies shaped just like mine!!!).

At 45 after a BAD divorce the stress of single parenting 4 kids and working full time (for the first time in 20 years) caused me to gain 20 lbs. Twenty pounds my frame did NOT need to carry around!

At 50 I was diagnosed as a diabetic. I called my sister, in tears. She told me our brother (56) had been diagnosed the same month. All we share is genetics ... we weren't raised together.

Again, a big shout out to those involved in diabetes education!!! Knowing what lurks beneath the surface is crucial for kids and young adults. I even hear my OWN kids talk about it now. Wow.
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 4/30/2007 8:21 AM (GMT -7)   
You are all pretty much on the same page so you are finally understanding this disease. I like the use of 'controlled' and 'reversed' instead of cured in everybody's writing.

Jennifer, you might want to give your friend encouragement and support. Send her here... but do your best not to be the food police. That will break up your friendship lickety-split and she will just spiral further down into denial. Been there... done that....

Sandy,
You probably know more about diabetes than your doctor IMHO. He would really have a problem with Warren... a type 2 of excellent health who had like 3% body fat when he was diagnosed type 2. Some of the current thought is that the diabetes causes the obesity which then perpetuates the insulin resistance. If diabetes is an "anti-famine" mechanism run amuck then this makes perfect sense.

Before animal domestication and agriculture our metabolisms were programmed to eat protein, fruit and vegetables, the things that could be found and consumed without storage or production. Our bodies adapted to grain storage and breads or carbs over time with lots of daily movement necessary to live and thrive. Since the industrial revolution and the electronic age our calorie need has greatly decreased while our food availability had dramatically increased. Without proper dietary & exercise education our future generations are all going to be doing this wonderful dance we are doing.

I think that if children today were shown how much activity children of 100 years ago had such as chopping the firewood or shoveling coal, feeding chickens and minding the family horse, stairs, walking everywhere, washing clothes, sweeping floors, carrying water for bathing... and how much food they ate... Then they compared it to their lives today it would help them understand that they don't need sugared cereals or soda with sugar, cookies and pop tarts with icing. It might start them on a life of correct eating... I think I'm gonna write a children's book about diabetes for my grand children... One set has three diabetic grandparents out of four...
~ Jeannie
Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class!
Yours may be one of them...

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


Arundinaria
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 160
   Posted 4/30/2007 2:42 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi This is my first posting on this list.  I want to support and concur with what the two previous commentators have said.  Diabetes is not cured or reversed.  It exists long before it shows its ugly head and will always be there unless you keep the number where they should be.  I have had diabetes about thirty years and only in the last few years have I made a conscious effort to control it.  I am now reaping the harvest of lack of control.  I have neeuropathy in my legs so bad that I can only walk a short distance.  I have just had a colostomy which the doctors believe is the result of diabetes nerve damage.  I have slight retinopathy.  Now I eat right and test often and dispair when I can't keep the numbers low.  The recent addition of prednisone has knocked them out of sight.  Tell your friend that she has an incurable disease and she must learn to live with itl 
That may be to the good since my wife always told me "the way to live a long and rich life is to get an incurable disease and learn to live with it
 
Arundinaria yeah yeah
When there are no more choices, tha decision is easy!


Marburg
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 486
   Posted 5/3/2007 10:49 AM (GMT -7)   
Interesting. I have a friend who was diagnosed with Diabetes about 7 years ago. She went on a low-carb, low calory diet, began an intensive exercise program and dropped 70 pounds. When she was diagnosed her sugars were 300 and up. She was put of metformin 4 times a day (500mg each time). After dropping 70 pounds her sugars went down to 70-100. She has been able to keep the weight off by exercising 3 times a week for 30 minutes, and watching what she eats. She does allow herself some sweets such as M&M's or a slice of chocolate pie (but not often). She no longer takes the metformin. Her doctor says while she is still diabetic (glucose tolerance test) it is controlled.

marburg

Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 5/3/2007 1:45 PM (GMT -7)   
Exactly Marburg! Controlled, not cured! And if your friend were to get an infection or break a limb and be in a cast the $%^#*@ Diabetes and elevated blood sugars would come roaring back with a vengeance! But I hope you can get some incentive from your friend. That is a tough row to hoe and she had done her body a huge favor! I admire her tremendously.
~ Jeannie
Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class!
Yours may be one of them...

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


Marburg
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 486
   Posted 5/4/2007 10:10 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks Jeannie,

Yes my friend has to be especially careful when she gets sick. She says her sugars go back up when she is stressed or sick but she's been able to bring them back down by carefully monitoring her sugars (sometimes 6-12 times a day) during those period and watching what and how much she eats.

Marburg
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Friday, December 09, 2016 8:40 AM (GMT -7)
There are a total of 2,735,339 posts in 301,296 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 151398 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, igiveup.
355 Guest(s), 13 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
81GyGuy, suebear, tennisplayer, tickcheckguy, Scaredy Cat, Loutucky, jabele, pmm73, maria2016, rockyfords, Denikeef, kodaska, k07


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2016 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer