difference in meters???

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

tomah
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 40
   Posted 5/4/2007 11:17 AM (GMT -7)   
I had an accu-check aviva monitor, but i can't afford the test strips anymore - they are so expensive!  So, I bought a Walgreens monitor and test strips (less than have the price of the accu-check strips).  I just tested on both machines, with the same finger prick of blood.  The accu-check says 101, the Walgreens says 83.  How can their be such a difference in the two monitors??  Now I don't know which one to believe.  I have calibrated both of them with the solutions.  Does anyone have any input on this?  Thank you in advance.

AMM
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 234
   Posted 5/4/2007 1:04 PM (GMT -7)   
All meters are a little different. There is a certain allowable difference in meter readings. (I'm not sure how much it is though) I'll see if I can find out.
What doesn't kill you makes you stronger.  Shouldn't I be invincible by now?


What's his name?
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 24
   Posted 5/4/2007 1:23 PM (GMT -7)   
Please share the results of your calibrations with us, control solution limits and meter readings.

harry4
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 1449
   Posted 5/4/2007 2:43 PM (GMT -7)   

these metres arent nearly as accurate as most people think they are

try taking 3  readings with any meter, using blood from the same hole, there are usually big differences

 

the decimal point in the readout suggests more accuracy that there is

none the less, they are a useful guide


recovered former longtime anxiety and panic attack sufferer and helper of other sufferers  but no training or  qualifications in medicine or psychology, any remarks that may be taken as advice must be confirmed with doctor or other health professional
emails are welcome but do mention healingwell to avoid risk of deletion as spam


Dead Man walking
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 49
   Posted 5/5/2007 10:29 AM (GMT -7)   
The other day, I didnt get a good finger prick. There was very little blood, and I didn't think the meter was going to have enough blood to give an accurate reading.  But then after a longer than usual time, it beeped, but it showed a really low number. So my question is, if the meter doesn't get enough blood, does it show lower BS readings?

What's his name?
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 24
   Posted 5/5/2007 12:20 PM (GMT -7)   
Dead Man Walking;

I would say yes, it does, if it doesn't refuse to do the test and display an error message.

The test strip detects the total glucose present. This is converted to a concentration by the fact that the blood volume in the sample is known and constant, since the strip takes up only so much and no more. If there isn't enough there, the meter "knows" how much glucose is there, but it "thinks" that the strip is filled, so it will compute a low number as the concentration.

You should do the test over when that happens.

Post Edited (What's his name?) : 5/5/2007 3:36:40 PM (GMT-6)


AMM
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 234
   Posted 5/5/2007 1:10 PM (GMT -7)   
It is a good idea to wash your hands before testing. You could have traces of sugars on your hands from touching something. Also warm water will help bring the blood to your fingertips.
What doesn't kill you makes you stronger.  Shouldn't I be invincible by now?


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 5/6/2007 4:28 PM (GMT -7)   

By law, a glucose meter must read accurately within 20%- that means if you take a reading and it is 100 - the true amount of glucose can be from 80 - 120.  If your reading is 200 the amount can be between 160 and 240.

Now if you stick two different fingers at the same time and take readings you will get 2 different numbers too. Warren has mentioned a study that showed certain fingers routinely give higher readings than others.

Your inexpensive meter was within the 20% allowable deviation.  Meter readings rarely show the exact amount of sugar in your blood. They show the amount of sugar in the sample within 20%.

Many meters throw an error if not enough blood is loaded onto the strip. My one touch meters (Ultra2,UltraMini, and UltraSmart), my precision XL, and my Ascensia contour do the same.

Soap, handcreams, food residue, excess moisture and alcohol can all give you a bogus reading.

I test frequently, use the results to look for trends in my readings, and compare my averages to my A1c results to determine how well I am controlling my sugar levels.

Here's an example- my AM fasting reading is usually between 80-95. Several weeks ago, I noticed that it had jumped to between 100-115, so I called my doctor- I thought I might be having some allergies but she had me come in 2 days later- lo and behold I had a sinus infection, a bladder infection and a kidney infection and was dehydrated to boot- those AM numbers stayed there until the infections went away. Fortunately, they are back down to the previous range although I was warned that it might not happen.

So- don't worry about your meter too much- they all have to be in the same lousy range :-)   sandy


I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


metres
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 32
   Posted 5/10/2007 2:39 PM (GMT -7)   
See my posting in this forum 2 months ago, when I posted my experiences with Accu-Check Aviva meters. 3 different Aviva units all consistently gave higher readings than any of my many other lab calibrated meters. The one lab calibration I did of an Aviva was 19% high at about 6.0 (108). I won't use Aviva any more.

Whatever meter you use should give consistent readings. Calibrate it against a lab blood glucose reading (not an A1C) by taking several strip tests immediately after the lab blood is drawn. If all of your meter readings aren't roughly the same, junk the meter. If the lab result isn't roughly the same as the meter results, junk the meter (or make a mental correction every time you use it).

I agree with What's his Name that small blood samples (but not small enough to cause a meter to give an error warning) can result in low readings. I've seen it many times.

When doing multiple tests I don't use the same blood drop, since I don't know that the chemicals in the strip won't affect (contaminate) the remaining blood drop. If I'm quick enough I can clean up my finger and still get more blood from the same hole. If not I prick again.

harry4
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 1449
   Posted 5/11/2007 3:30 PM (GMT -7)   
any grease on fingers such as from eating fried chicken will stop the preferred hanging drop from forming

recovered former longtime anxiety and panic attack sufferer and helper of other sufferers  but no training or  qualifications in medicine or psychology, any remarks that may be taken as advice must be confirmed with doctor or other health professional
emails are welcome but do mention healingwell to avoid risk of deletion as spam

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Saturday, December 10, 2016 1:51 AM (GMT -7)
There are a total of 2,735,779 posts in 301,334 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 151435 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, Manny222.
152 Guest(s), 4 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
bluelyme, Heatheranne87, Job_the_Phoenix, kimbfowler


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2016 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer