Accu Check Monitors

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noplainjane
New Member


Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 5/16/2007 6:30 PM (GMT -7)   
I have been recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and I am using an accu check monitor. Tonight I got a reading of 208 then retook it and got a reading of 318 and tried a third time and got 140. Does anyone have any problems with these monitors?? Do not know which is correct. Any advice out there???

(I have switched your post to black and white because typing in red can cause members with epilepsy to have a seizure.~Jeannie)

Post Edited By Moderator (Jeannie143) : 5/17/2007 12:51:22 PM (GMT-6)


AMM
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 234
   Posted 5/16/2007 7:00 PM (GMT -7)   
I don't have an accucheck meter, but I would suggest you check to make sure you have the proper code set. Also be sure to keep your test strips in the original container with the cap closed.
What doesn't kill you makes you stronger.  Shouldn't I be invincible by now?


Dead Man walking
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Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 49
   Posted 5/16/2007 9:30 PM (GMT -7)   

Dang, unless you were juggling marzipan or working in a confectionary, I'd return it, and get a new one.  Yours is not working properly or even within the 20% maximum error tolerance.

 

They shouldn't give you a problem returning it for a new one. And if they do, I would pull out the kit, take a couple samples in front them. That ought to scare away half the store.

 

I presume that you are using the same test site (a clean finger) , and that these tests were within a few minutes of each other?

 

That really sucks that these kits can be so inaccurate!

 


AMM
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 234
   Posted 5/17/2007 2:39 AM (GMT -7)   
DMW, Don't jump the gun. It could just be that the machine isn't properly coded or it is a bad bottle of strips. If it turns out the machine doesn't work there should be no problem getting it replaced.
What doesn't kill you makes you stronger.  Shouldn't I be invincible by now?


quatlox
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 41
   Posted 5/17/2007 8:10 AM (GMT -7)   

Did you wash you hands with soap and water real good?

I do not believe in the isopropyl alcohol wipes as they can just move sugar around on your finger and not remove it as I passed out from a low and the paramedic tested my finger about 3 times (as I was told by my wife who insisted they give me glucose to bring my sugar up) and got highs every time (The paramedic said I was not low as I about died of a low).  They took me to the hospital and the Dr in the emergency room had the blood drawn from my arm and sent to the lab which reported a reading of 14.  They gave me glucose and I came back to life.

I now wash my hands very good to wash all sugar off as it could be on different fingers in different amounts.

Then again, You could have a faulty meter.

Bob


Dead Man walking
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Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 49
   Posted 5/17/2007 1:01 PM (GMT -7)   
AMM said...
DMW, Don't jump the gun. It could just be that the machine isn't properly coded or it is a bad bottle of strips. If it turns out the machine doesn't work there should be no problem getting it replaced.

AMM , having looked back at her post, I agree that we need more info from her. 
She didn't say exactly when the readings were taken. Or If she had purchased new strips and recalibrated, etc.
Sorry bout that.

dom
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 152
   Posted 5/17/2007 5:44 PM (GMT -7)   
You can always call the phone number on the back of the meter.  My husband had a new meter sent to him over night mail.  Once a new one was sent after my husband dropped it in the dishwater. 

Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 5/18/2007 7:25 AM (GMT -7)   
Dom,
Your husband does dishes? (Why else would he be standing over the dishwater?) Does he give lessons to other dish washing impaired males? (LOL!)
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class! Yours may be one of them...
==================
"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


Phishbowl
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 547
   Posted 5/18/2007 11:51 AM (GMT -7)   
Give the AccuCheck folks a call (should be a "hotline" number or service number on the back of your monitor). They'll run you through a few checks and balances - calibrating your monitor, doing a finger test, etc.- then they'll usually not hesitate to send you a new monitor with some test strips and a return envelope to send your defective one back in. When I had to do it, I received it the next day.

***Note: I just received in this morning's mail, a letter from LifeScan advising to check the OneTouch Ultra test strip bottles for possible puncture hole near the opening of the strip container/vial. They show a picture of what they describe and the hole would be very readily recognizable; you would see it right away. They say only a small number of vials may have gone out but, I'm glad they forewarn us nonetheless.
Cheers,
- Phishbowl (Type 1 since Jan'05 - Levemir, NovoRapid)
"What's Not Measured Is Not Managed"

"It is impossible for a man to learn what he thinks he already knows"-Epictetus


dom
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 152
   Posted 5/18/2007 12:09 PM (GMT -7)   
Jeannie,  He was not doing dishes or anything else around the house.  If I can't do it, it won't get done.  I also cut the grass, 5 1/2 acres.

metres
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 32
   Posted 5/19/2007 11:56 AM (GMT -7)   
I've had problems with Accu-check monitors consistently reading high, so I don't use them any more. I posted some of my experiences in early March in this forum. I have found Ascensia Contours, and OneTouch Ultras or Ultrasmarts to be dependable, accurate, and usable at colder temperatures than some of the other meters.

As other posters have said, you need to check your testing technique (clean dry hands,) and verify that your strips are good (not out of date, clean, stored in original sealed container). A coding error would not cause your problem since in that case all of the errors would be in the same direction (all high or all low, depending on which way the coding error was). The only real way to calibrate your meter is to take several meter readings at the same time as you have a lab blood sample taken for a glucose reading. If your meter readings are not all very close to each other and reasonably close to the lab reading, there is a problem. I don't consider the +/- 20% standard to be reasonably close.

It's not unusual to sometimes get a bad reading, but it should not happen frequently. I always retest to confirm when I get a reading which is way off what I expect.

Let us know what the problem was once you figure it out.

What's his name?
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 24
   Posted 5/19/2007 4:00 PM (GMT -7)   
The only way to check a meter is with control solutions from the manufacturer. Phone the number on the back of the meter and ask them to send you some solution(s). They will want you to report your results and if they think the meter is flakey they will most likely replace it.

The control solution is a reference, your blood is an unknown. You cannot calibrate anything with an unknown. Let us know how it turns out.

What model is it and how old is it?

metres
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 32
   Posted 5/20/2007 11:54 AM (GMT -7)   
What's his Name,

A control solution test is not the same as calibrating a meter against a lab test. Control solution testing has the advantages of being able to be done immediately, at home, and with minimal cost. Yes, noplainjane should check her/his meter with test solution, but it is not a calibration, just a "go/no go" test. My current test strips have an acceptable control solution result of 5.4 - 7.5 (96 - 132). That's almost +/- 16%.

What's his name?
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 24
   Posted 5/20/2007 12:47 PM (GMT -7)   
The center of the "acceptable" range is the value the meter would read if it were accurate. The acceptable range is exactly that, and it is also the range within which the manufacturer will not accept a claim that its meter is inaccurate.

A control solution test is, therefor, a calibration, but usually with only one test. In order to improve the statistics you would have to run several control tests and calculate their mean, and few of us ever do that.

A working definition of calibration is the measurement of a known value and comparing the result to that known value.

Post Edited (What's his name?) : 5/20/2007 1:52:29 PM (GMT-6)


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 5/20/2007 4:37 PM (GMT -7)   
If your readings are out of the range of the control solution (higher than 136, lower than 90), there is no way to determine the accuracy outside the range. I called the One Touch folks and asked for a low range control solution (since my readings are usually in the 75-95 range) and the rep said, "HUH?" (direct quote). Then I asked for the molarity of their 'sugar' solution and was asked, "Is this some sort of a joke?"  So, I asked for tech support (as opposed to customer service) and no one there could help me out either- he read the manual that came with the meter to me word-for-word.  Now I just use my meter to look for trends in my sugars- and don't drive myself crazy with the rest of it.
I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


What's his name?
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 24
   Posted 5/20/2007 4:48 PM (GMT -7)   
We don't care about the molarity, we only care about the concentration if we are in the US. If we are not, then all we have to do is either convert by dividing by 18 or read the bottle. The employee you talked to wasn't too quick, but you should be able to do the conversion yourself. Don't forget the factor of 1000 to convert from millimols. I am having trouble figuring out why the molarity is of concern to you. It is just a different unit with well known conversion factors.

I say again, the range is the outer limits of the tolerance.

By the way, if you do a control check at both high and low points, figure out how far you are off at each of those points, then plot them both on a graph, the line connecting them will be a good guess at the "accuracy outside the range" so there is a way to approximate it. The (perhaps slight, perhaps not) hitch is that the error function may not be linear, and you only have two points.

The manufacturers try for better accuracy at the low end, where it is more critical.

Hope this helps.

Post Edited (What's his name?) : 5/20/2007 6:03:12 PM (GMT-6)


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 5/21/2007 8:26 AM (GMT -7)   

Molarity is a measure of the concentration of a solution.

My training is in protein biochemistry and I hold a PhD, and I am well-versed in statistical analysis. I have access to software that is capable of calculating and plotting both linear and non-linear regression. If they could supply me with the molarity of their control solution, I could make my own, serial dilute it, measure the results, and perform my own statistical analysis. I could analyze the contents of the control solutions that I already have, but the results would only be valid for those bottles- unless they have a standard concentration and they manufacture to the standard- which they can't or won't tell me. They don't publish their data anywhere they I can find- so I have decided to just relax and watch the trends rather than obsess over the numbers themselves.

Thanks for the reply :-)   sandy 

 
I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


What's his name?
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 24
   Posted 5/21/2007 9:36 AM (GMT -7)   
I suspect that they do make up standard solutions, more or less. Don't forget that the numbers on the strip label are the readings which that particular lot of strips will give when tested with that particular batch of the (standard) control solution. At least that is my guess. They add other things, such as stabilizers, to the solutions also, I believe, so they aren't just aqueous glucose solutions.

Our meters are supposedly only good for showing trends anyway, but it is mildly frustrating when they give such flakey results at times. Trying to get a real handle on their accuracy or precision is almost more bother than it is worth. Hard numbers are hard to come by.

It amazes me that they work at all in the first place. We are detecting and quantifying micrograms of substance in a "soup" (blood) containing all sorts of other things in addition to what we want. We are assuming that the reagents in each strip are the same, that each strip slurps up the same volume of blood as every other strip and so on. It is a nightmare, but all in all they work pretty well and are more or less affordable, thank goodness.

Cheers!

Post Edited (What's his name?) : 5/21/2007 10:53:37 AM (GMT-6)

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