test strip code

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tangerine bear
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Date Joined Aug 2005
Total Posts : 941
   Posted 6/7/2007 8:38 AM (GMT -7)   
OK I'm really dumb...
 
I THouGHt I had read all the directions for testing... I don't know how I missed this part! I didn't realize you have to match the code to the code on the bottle...
 
I just reread the instructions... and now I know. It really made a difference in my test results. It was 120 with the wrong code and only 112 with the right code. I guess this means all my readings have been wrong. I guess I won't know for sure until my next blood test eyes
 
Just in case anyone else has ever made this mistake...
 
Bear
"It's a jungle out there....." 
Theme song from "Monk" by Randy Newman
 
"Turn this car around... I'm goin' back..."
Tom Petty
 
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LanieG
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Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5397
   Posted 6/7/2007 9:20 AM (GMT -7)   
Code?    confused
 
Is this something related to a particular monitor?  I use Bayer Ascensia but I don't know anything about codes.
Lanie, clueless
"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise


Jeannie143
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Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 6/7/2007 10:03 AM (GMT -7)   
Lanie,
Some of the less expensive monitors, like mine, require you to input the code from the strip bottle to the machine so it will read the blood correctly. I believe that your monitor is self regulated. I'll bet you have insurance?
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class! Yours may be one of them...
==================
"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 6/7/2007 10:05 AM (GMT -7)   
Some meters have a code on the test strip vial. You have to set your meter to match the code for that particular batch of strips. The OneTouch Meters, Freestyle, and Precision that I own, all have to be coded. I have a Bayer Ascensia still in the box- so I'm not sure about that one.
sandy
I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


LanieG
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Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5397
   Posted 6/7/2007 10:50 AM (GMT -7)   

Ok.  I re-read the booklet and there are no codes to put in.  I thought I was missing something here.  We do have insurance but at about $40 for 100 test strips, I think that's still expensive.  I suppose that's why I use one lancet for a whole week, just so I'm not a slave to these supplies.  I use alcohol to clean the lancet in between uses and even after one week, it's still very sharp. 

Thanks for the information.

Lanie


"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 6/7/2007 1:21 PM (GMT -7)   
I have insurance and it pays a whole $5.00 on a box of 50 strips- whoop-de-doo. It's cheaper for me to buy the lancets over the counter at Walmart than to purchase through the required mail vendor. Insurance is no guarantee of reasonably priced supplies.
confused  sandy
I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


LanieG
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Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5397
   Posted 6/7/2007 2:21 PM (GMT -7)   
That's true, Sandy.  That's one of the problems with medical insurance.  Great that we're "covered" but at what cost and what do we really get sometimes?  I also blame the pharmaceutical companies for the cost, too.  And what of those with no insurance. sad
Lanie
 


"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise

Post Edited (lanieg) : 6/7/2007 3:28:43 PM (GMT-6)


quatlox
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 41
   Posted 6/8/2007 11:01 AM (GMT -7)   
lanieg said...
I also blame the pharmaceutical companies for the cost, too.  . sad
Lanie
 

 
Lanie,  I also blame the pharmaceutical companies.  I would almost go to bat to say that the code is only there to insure that you are using strips that are in date.  I really don't see a need to code every set of strips with a different code.  I mean how does a meter made in 2005 really code a strip made in 2007.  It's all "HOG WASH".  I use a lot of test equipment in my lab and none of it requires codes to insure you get the same results after changing from one batch to another or even changing from one vendor to another.
 
Bear, the 112 and 120 reading are all within the 20% rule of these test instruments.  I can dotest the same finger within 2 minutes of each test and get the same numbers you got (in fact I have gotten numbers that are further apart than yours).
 
Have you noticed that they also put very short expiration dates on these strips.  I think it is all a pharmaceutical conspiricy to make us think we need new strips when the old ones expire so we will spend more of our hard earned money on pharmaceutical supplies.
 
Just my opinion, but I used to do stability studies on pharmaceuticals and found that after five years beyond expiration dates they still had 90% to 95% active ingredients, but the pharmaceutical companys would say they were dangerous to use (what crap) and to destroy them and "BUY NEW DRUGS".  All they really want is all of our hard earned MONEY.
 
Bob

tangerine bear
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Date Joined Aug 2005
Total Posts : 941
   Posted 6/9/2007 8:18 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi all,

I agree about the pharmaceutical companies. The insurance companies are not much help either! They have made premiums so expensive that many employers are dropping the health insurance benefit. That happened to me last fall, and I have been on Cobra since then at $368 a month (just for me). I have to keep it with all my health issues and meds, but I just found out I'm losing my job at the end of the month (my project is ending). I've worked there 13 years.... I don't know how I'm going to afford any of this! Thankfully my doc gives me samples whenever she has them, but that won't help with test strips... I think I'll have to test a LOT less often. sad I'm hoping that watching my diet carefully will keep my readings low.

Bear


"It's a jungle out there....." 
Theme song from "Monk" by Randy Newman
 
"Turn this car around... I'm goin' back..."
Tom Petty
 
                       VIEW IMAGE
 

                           


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 6/9/2007 11:56 AM (GMT -7)   
Bear,
You can do as I did and get a Prestige IQ meter with 300 strips for $104 and free shipping. The meter uses regualr AA batteries and is very acurate. Not only that, the replacement strips are only about 30ยข each. Works for me... As far as the insurance goes... I'm still looking for catastrophic insurance only. I need something in case I have to go to the hospital but I'm willing to pay for all my doctor visits and meds. I use the $4 prescripiton thing at walmart for most of my generic meds and I purchase some of my meds from a mail order company from a far away location. (If you want to know more about that please email me - jeannie143 at gmail dot com)

I've been without insurance for about two years now... just limping along trying to hang on. My doctor always asks me if I am "still insurancically challenged" and we laugh. She only orders specific tests that I need and also has gone back to some older meds for me because they are affordable in the $4 generic version. We both have learned that I don't need the newest and best meds anyway... Two of them I've been on have been recalled for heart problems anyway!

And as far as the outdated drugs goes... I've been using my whole bottle of Lantus instead of tossing it when 28 days are up. doc said as long as my sugars are ok then the Lantus must be working. She told me to keep it refridgerated and use it all. So far this year (at $90 a bottle) I've probably saved $360 on Lantus alone. I have a very understanding doctor.
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class! Yours may be one of them...
==================
"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross

Post Edited (Jeannie143) : 6/9/2007 12:59:15 PM (GMT-6)


tangerine bear
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2005
Total Posts : 941
   Posted 6/10/2007 8:16 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Jeannie,

I also have a very understanding doctor... that helps a lot. My problem is that I have a lot of other meds besides the diabetes drugs, and lots of other health problems. Thankfully, she loads me up with samples of whatever she has when I go in. I won't let my insurance go unless I HAVE to... for as long as the Cobra lasts, I think about a year more. Maybe by then I'll find a new job with health insurance :) do jobs like that still exist? My friend brought me a bottle of Lexapro she didn't take, and it's about a month's supply... it's good thru this May, so I suppose it's still fine... I'm going to try it anyway... that one's a $40 copay!

bear
"It's a jungle out there....." 
Theme song from "Monk" by Randy Newman
 
"Turn this car around... I'm goin' back..."
Tom Petty
 
                       VIEW IMAGE
 

                           


metres
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 32
   Posted 6/17/2007 11:24 AM (GMT -7)   
quatlox said...
Lanie,  I also blame the pharmaceutical companies.  I would almost go to bat to say that the code is only there to insure that you are using strips that are in date.  I really don't see a need to code every set of strips with a different code.  I mean how does a meter made in 2005 really code a strip made in 2007.  It's all "HOG WASH".  I use a lot of test equipment in my lab and none of it requires codes to insure you get the same results after changing from one batch to another or even changing from one vendor to another.
 
Bob, You are dangerously wrong. An incorrect strip code can result in a serious measurement error. Different batches of strips do not have identical reactivities, and the code allows the meter to apply a correction factor to the result. During manufacturing, each batch of strips is sampled, and is assigned the code for the appropriate required correction factor. The error resulting from using an incorrect code depends on how much the applied correction factor differs from the right one; it can be relatively minor or very significant.
 
One Touch meters (InDuo, Ultra, Ultra 2, and Ultra Smart) require manual coding (1 - 49). Other meters require similar manual coding. I once coded an Ultra 2 meter to 1 and tested a strip with control solution. I repeated the test with a strip from the same batch after coding the meter to 49. One result was 7.1 and the other was 4.5.
 
Accu-chek Avivas do not require you to manually input the code because the code is contained on the chip that comes with each set of strips. There are other meters that also use similar techniques.
Bayer was the first company to offer self coding meters. The Bayer Ascensia Breeze and Contour don't require coding. I don't know how they do this.

tangerine bear
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2005
Total Posts : 941
   Posted 6/17/2007 4:34 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi metres,

That is exactly why I am worried! I have no idea what my sugar readings REALLY were for the first 2 months of using the meter confused  because I didn't put the code in. The only ones I know are right are the readings since June 7 when I wrote this post! At least my readings have been similar to earlier ones, but I won't get over my nervousness about this mistake until I get my second A1c blood test... I'm not sure when they are going to do that. Well, hopefully, I'm okay.... confused

bear


"It's a jungle out there....." 
Theme song from "Monk" by Randy Newman
 
"Turn this car around... I'm goin' back..."
Tom Petty
 
                       VIEW IMAGE
 

                           


4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 6/17/2007 5:55 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi ..

I have insurance but also pay $40 for a vial of test strips and my meter needs to be coded as well. Am I thankful I have it (insurance, that is). Well, yes. But is it "free" stuff and "good" equipment? I get what will be covered.
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


quatlox
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 41
   Posted 6/18/2007 7:10 AM (GMT -7)   
metres,
 
Thanks for correcting me and adding the valued info.  It sounds like you have worked with these types of strips for awhile.
 
Thanks
Bob

Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 6/18/2007 10:00 AM (GMT -7)   
If you all want to feel better you could be as old as dirt like I am... I remember when a blood draw for diabetes was done at the doctor's office or a lab... No home testing kits!!!

Things are much gooder now, even if we have to program the meters... tongue
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class! Yours may be one of them...
==================
"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 6/18/2007 10:50 AM (GMT -7)   
You sure done spoke the truth, sweetpea ... things are MUCH gooder now. I figure if there was ever a time to get diagnosed with diabetes, this is it!
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise


metres
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 32
   Posted 6/20/2007 12:33 PM (GMT -7)   
Bear.
You can't do anything about the previous incorrectly coded readings, so don't worry about them. Make sure you let your doctor know what happened so she doesn't try to change your treatment based on an invalid A1C. If you are still using strips with the same code, and you know what invalid code you were using you can get a rough idea of how bad the error was. Run a control solution test with the correct code and then with the incorrect code. Don't forget to reset your meter to the correct code.

I'd be more concerned about why you made the mistake in the first place.

Ruth,
Meters that need to be coded should not be thought of as cheap or less accurate. It's just one particular manufacturing approach to the problem of unavoidable process control variations in the sensors. Unfortunately the manual coding approach requires the user to do things correctly. Some meters count the number of strips used and remind you to reset the code whenever a vial is finished.

The simplest analogy I can think of for the strip codes, is to think of a shoe making machine. Every time it is turned on it produces a batch (lot) of shoes (strips), but you can't control exactly what size (reactivity) each batch is. Measure a few shoes (strips) from each batch to determine which size (code) they are closest to, and package the rest of the batch (lot) accordingly.

Bob,
I have years of experience with designing, installing and using experimental measurement systems. Now that I have to use blood glucose monitors for my health, I'm appalled at how poor they are, and how poorly understood they are by patients and heathcare professionals. One of the best approaches to controlling blood sugar is intensive insulin therapy, where a slow acting insulin is used to provide a base level of insulin, and a bolus of extremely fast acting insulin is taken with every meal, based on the premeal sugar level, the amount of carbs to be consumed, and the amount of exercise to be done.
A premeal reading of 5 (90) is just right for me. The +/- 20% "standard" means that reading can be 4 (72) which means I'll cut my insulin for the next meal or eat extra, or 6.2 (110) which means I'll bump my insulin or eat less. The only way to make this work is to be sure that the reading I use has nowhere near 20% error. I restest any unexpectedly high or low readings, and I always have more than 1 meter available which is proven accurate against a lab calibration. I also evaluate the precision (repeatablility) of my meters by taking multiple calibration readings.

tangerine bear
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2005
Total Posts : 941
   Posted 6/20/2007 5:22 PM (GMT -7)   
:-) Hi Metres,

I can answer your question very easily!!! I am SOOOOOOOOOOO dumb! LOL! My friend had an extra unopened meter, so she brought it over (because I suspected diabetes from my symptoms) and showed me how to use it. She programmed it the day she came, but I am sure I was so nervous that I wasn't paying close attention.... I knew NOTHING about diabetes or testing, and when she showed me what my reading was that first day..... my mind went to lala land confused. The first time I had to do my own test, I put the strip in upside down LOL. The next day I went to the doc and had the diagnosis confirmed and I showed her that I already had a meter, and "thought" I knew how to use it (duh). I watched the video that came with it, but I missed the part about the codes I suppose. I'm lucky I caught it when I did. This is my second rx of the strips, so I have NO IDEA what the last strip code was. I am just moving on from here, no point in crying over my past mistakes. At least I know I was following my diet, and that my eyesight has cleared up (and my other symptoms went away), and that's the most important thing.

Bear tongue
"It's a jungle out there....." 
Theme song from "Monk" by Randy Newman
 
"Turn this car around... I'm goin' back..."
Tom Petty
 
                       VIEW IMAGE
 

                           


N17
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 87
   Posted 6/21/2007 9:16 AM (GMT -7)   
I have an accu-chek advantage and, as mentioned before, each container (50 strips) comes with a chip which you just slide in the back of the monitor and off you go.  I don't know if they do it in the US (or elsewhere for that matter), but here in Australia, they send you replacement batteries for free, for ever.  Nice touch.  Also, the government medicare system here means that a pack of 50 strips costs $6 AUS.  At the moment, I have an assistance card that gets me them for $1 (approx 84c US).
"I love Italian.......and so do you"
"Yes"  -  Star Trek 4
 
Brian (Type 2 NIDDM).
 
N17 is the postcode for the London suburb of Tottenham.
Tottenham Hotspur is the greatest football team in the world!
 
...and Go Bengals! and the Cardinals!  and the Leafs!
 

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