What is normal?

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dmjain6
New Member


Date Joined Jun 2007
Total Posts : 12
   Posted 7/7/2007 10:13 AM (GMT -7)   
 
I have been hearing a lot of conflicting answers for this.  What is a normal blood sugar reading after eating?  I have heard anything over 100 is bad, but others have said anything over 200 is bad.  Which is it?  I'm not talking about a fasting blood sugar, I mean any time of the day blood sugar reading.
Is 140-150 nothing to worry about? (Not fasting)
 
thanks,
Amanda

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5394
   Posted 7/7/2007 12:02 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi Amanda, your question will get you answers in a wide range of numbers depending on the source!  The American Diabetes Assoc., your doctor, another person's doctor, your neighbor - they all seem to have a different answer.  So, here's what I've come across:  a healthy non-diabetic would probably have a reading of less than 120 about 2 hours after a meal.  Theirs would rarely go above 140 after eating.  The diabetes "industry" will probably tell you "less than 140" is ok.  But if you do more reading on the subject, you'll find that blood sugars in ranges higher than 140 (or even higher than 120) on a regular basis might be damaging to your internal organs over time.  And you never want to be near or over 200!  Some factors that give you high readings after eating would be the amount of carbohydrates you ate and also the amount of food you ate even if you didn't overdo the carbs.  I hope that gives a little insight!  Welcome to the fuzzy world of diabetes.  :)

Lanie   



"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


dmjain6
New Member


Date Joined Jun 2007
Total Posts : 12
   Posted 7/7/2007 1:06 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for the responce!  You are right, I have heard so many different things. It's all confusing!  A few weeks ago my Dr. told me that I had pre-diabetes and wants me to come back in a month to test again.  So it's been two weeks that I have been testing at home and I always stay between 140-150.  Also when I first wake up, on average, is 100-130.  Do those numbers indicate pre-diabetes or diabetes?  I know the only way to know for sure is the blood testing I will be getting, but I don't know at what point pre-diabetes turns into diabetes.  Is there a certain number that says it's diabetes?  I'm scared that the Dr. is going to tell me that it's diabetes!
I have been trying to watch what I eat, but so far my numbers haven't changed at all.
 
Also, can you have symptoms when you have pre-diabetes, or do the symptoms show up when it turns into diabetes?  I have experianced some symptoms over the past few months, but I don't know if it's related or not.  I have symptoms of low blood sugar, but my blood sugar isn't low, but it's not too high either.  I seem to feel shaky and sick when it's in the 150 range.  But a nurse told me that it's not possible to feel high blood sugar untill it's 700 or higher. But others have told me that they also feel sick when it's below 700.  So I don't know at what point you can actually feel sick when the numbers are high.
It seems the more I read about this the more confused I get! LOL
 
Also, so far, the people that I have talked to said that pre-diabetes is not serious and to just ignor it. Because if I were to get diabetes in the future there is nothing that I can do about it now. Is that true?

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5394
   Posted 7/7/2007 2:37 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi Amanda, last fall I was where you are now.  So, here's what I've learned but keep in mind that every person's body (and pancreas) handles food differently perhaps.  First of all, your numbers are elevated and would be either "prediabetic" or "diabetic" depending on the doctor you're seeing.  You'll probably be given a glucose tolerance test in which you have to drink that sugary liquid.  There's another test, a simple blood test, called the A1c which can tell your blood sugar levels from the past 3 months.  I'm not sure if there's a "certain number" but the ADA online says: "criteria for diagnosing diabetes are met when any of the following results have been repeated on at least 2 different days: a fasting blood glucose level is 123 or higher, a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test os 200 or higher, symptoms of diabetes are present and a random blood glucose test is 200 or higher.  (Symptoms are increased thirst, increased urination, unexplained weight loss, fatigue, blurred vision, tingling or numbness in hands or feet.)"

I don't know about the symptoms before turning into diabetes.  When I was diagnosed as pre-diabetic, I didn't have any symptoms, but that's me.  Feeling shakey and sick could be really low sugar, hypoglycemia, but you said you haven't had readings that low.  I don't know about those feelings in the 150 range.  I used to have readings that high in the past but never those feelings. 

The last part of your post is dangerous to you!!!  Don't let anyone ever tell you to ignore this.  Being pre-diabetic IS serious.  You might be able to avoid future complications and illness by controlling your blood sugar now.  Read as much as you can of the past postings on this forum and you'll find a lot of information.  Buy Richard Bernstein's Diabetes Solutions.  Or, at the very least do these:  1. Cut down or cut out white foods like potatoes (deadly to diabetics), cakes, cookies, rice, bread...  2.  Eat moderately, not a lot at any one meal.  3.  Eat more vegetables and meat, chicken fish.  4.  Record what you eat and the time and your blood sugar readings so you'll know what foods raise your blood sugar.  5.  Exercise like walking, do resistance training with dumbbells.

I used to have fasting numbers from 110 to 126 but now they're in the 80's and 90's.  I've lost about 30 lbs from last summer and I think that's also helped in addition to a complete change of how I've been eating.  My last blood work came out so good my doctor wrote "outstanding" on my copy.  But - I'm not "there" yet and I do know I'll always have to follow this way of eating because I still cannot eat carbohydrates without spikes in the blood sugar.

Good luck and remember, we're here to help you.  We're all in the same boat.

yeah   Lanie


"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


tangerine bear
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2005
Total Posts : 941
   Posted 7/7/2007 4:21 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi Amanda,

Lanie is an expert already and she really knows all about diabetes (WAY more than I do... I was only diagnosed in April), but I can tell you this... Lanie is RIGHT.... DON'T ignore this! Whoever told you that is plain WRONG! My late father was pre-diabetic (they used to call it "borderline") before he became full blown, and had to go on insulin shots. I feel lucky that I got symptoms, or mine could have gone undetected longer! My FBS was over 200 when I was diagnosed, and my doctor just said "you have diabetes!". Now I'm following the advice of the members here and doing everything I can to keep my numbers low, and I have to take oral meds. I know it's a blessing to have HW and have all the input of others in all stages of this disease to help me along. I feel it is WAY better to take control of this before it becomes full blown diabetes like mine is. (((Hugs))) and stay with us!

Bear :-)

P.S. That nurse is nutty... 700???????? I sure wasn't anywhere near that range when I had symptoms!!


"It's a jungle out there....." 
Theme song from "Monk" by Randy Newman
 
OCD: Obsessive...Compulsive...Diabetic
 
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Post Edited (tangerine bear) : 7/7/2007 5:26:25 PM (GMT-6)


dmjain6
New Member


Date Joined Jun 2007
Total Posts : 12
   Posted 7/7/2007 6:43 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks to both of you!  I can't wait to get in to see my Dr. in 2 weeks.  I just want to know once and for all and be told exactly what I can and can't eat.  I still have so many questions.  And I think I might mention to my Dr. what the nurse told me. She gave me some wrong info about my son and because I listend to her my son had to have emergancy surgery the next day. You would have thought I would have learned the first time. :)  I thought a nurse would know better about something like this though.  Who knows what other bad info she is giving other patients?!!
Keep your fingers crossed that I'm just at a  pre-diabetic and not full blown diabetes.
 
Once you become pre-diabetic are you always going to be that way or can you get rid of it with diet and excersise?

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5394
   Posted 7/7/2007 8:59 PM (GMT -7)   

Hey Amanda, that's hard to say if anyone can 'get rid of it'.  I have no idea.  Much of this depends on why a person is diabetic to begin with.  Heredity, some medicine can cause very high readings, different reasons ....  Diabetes has been in my family for 2 generations, but I'm controlling mine with just diet and exercise so far. I discovered that if I cut out carbohydrates, as I have already written about before, and stay on my exercise program that I can indeed control my numbers.  I used to have numbers in the 150's and 160's after meals.  Now, it's maybe around 115 to 118 after eating.  Also, I've lost weight (which I needed to do  eyes ), so all that has helped me "see the light" so to speak.  You can do your best to control your own numbers too - consider it a challenge and strive to meet it.  The thing is not to give up.   

Thanks, Bear, for your kind words! redface   Honestly, I'm no expert!  I only know what I know, and what I know came from reading nearly everything on this forum and elsewhere online.  The amazing thing is that I found I was able to lower my readings.  Honestly, I think everyone can do the same thing.  Have you read Jeannie's latest posts?  She's doing really well and just with changing her own diet.  (To understand the functions of the pancreas, beta cells, insulin, etc., ask Jeannie because I still don't fully understand all that, but what I do know is how to eat now!)

I figured I'll do whatever it takes to meet this disease on my terms.  If, however, my new way of eating can't control my numbers, then I would go on meds but not before.  Girrrrrrrl Power.  :-)

And, Bear, good luck with your lab tests.  I know you can bring them down, too!

Lanie



"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5394
   Posted 7/7/2007 9:46 PM (GMT -7)   

One more thing.  I know this might sound strange to you, Amanda, but many if not most of the forum people here disagree with the diet guidelines of the ADA.  (You're in the States?)  The ADA and many doctors still advise to follow the food pyramid and eat a diet of about 55% carbohydrates, whole grains, etc.  Well, if you do that, you probably can't control your blood sugar yourself.  (Of course, not everyone is in a stage where blood glucose can be controlled without meds.)  In any case, your doctor may hand you a print out with a diabetic "diet" and if it's from the ADA recommending all those carbs, your numbers will not go any lower.  My own doctor (a GP) did that and the nutritionist told me I could cut the carbs way down to around 40%.  I did and couldn't figure out why I still had such high numbers - well, hello?  Carbs drive blood sugar up.  So, several things happened at once.  I remembered reading the South Beach diet at the beginning and Phase 1 (no carbs), I learned about the Glycemic Index, I tried not eating carbs and I got better numbers, I read a lot online about carbs, and one of the members here (Thank you, Fergusc!) recommended the Richard Bernstein book.  Suddenly, it all came together and I was enlightened.  If you don't know about the Glycemic Index of foods, search online for it and you'll learn which foods you'll probably be able to eat with impunity (the lower GI foods).

Lanie


"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


dmjain6
New Member


Date Joined Jun 2007
Total Posts : 12
   Posted 7/7/2007 11:58 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks Lanie, I will remember that about the carbs! Honestly before all of this, I thought it was just sugar that you had to stay away from. I'm now starting to read labels and really pay attention to what I eat. Up untill now, I knew carbs were bad, but I didn't know how important they could actually hurt you. So I will work on that! So does this mean no carbs at all or can I eat good carbs? I don't really know what "good carbs" are right now. I know cake and cookies are "bad carbs". And I had no idea potaoes were bad! That is going to be a hard one for me! I love potatoes!! Looks like I'm going to have to study up on carbs. ;)
Honestly, am I overreacting about being scared to death about diabetes? I'm not obsessed (yet lol), but have been spending a lot of time learning as much as I can, found this forum, etc. Everybody in my family is saying even if it's diabetes it's no big deal and I'm making a mountain out of a mole hill. They told me that you just watch what you eat and you will be fine. Do people really die from this? I think this has been kind of a wake up call for me. To be honest, I have not paid that much attention to what I eat. My died isn't bad, but it's definatly not great. Since I have had kids I have kinda put myself on the back burner and hate that I did this to myself. I have been kinda beating myself up because if I would have paid more attention to my health this might not have happend. My uncle has type II diabetes, but that was probably due to very poor diet and very over weight. I don't have as much weight to lose as he did, but I have let myself go sinse I have had kids. I think I would like to lose about 35 lbs. I would be happy at that weight.
Did you go through anything like this by blaming yourself?

One more question, Is it unfair of me to ask my husband to change his diet too? He eats REALLY bad, but is in great shape. I'm sure I'm not eating as well as a Dr. would tell me to eat, but I have cleaned up my diet some. But it is hard. I love food and it feels hard to do when my husband is sitting there eating all this food that I love, but I know I can't have it. Can I eat those things, but a smaller portion, or do I have to cut them out all-together? Like, can I have a small peice of cake at a B-day party or a wedding? We were at a wedding this afternoon and I didn't eat the cake caues I didn't want that to hurt me. But I really wanted a piece. What do you think?

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5394
   Posted 7/8/2007 6:06 AM (GMT -7)   

Amanda!  Your life reads almost exactly like mine.  I knew nothing about diabetes even though my mother and her mother had it, but no one talked about it.  And I know for a fact that my mother never followed a good diet.  Anyway, "good" carbs are the ones that have a lot of fiber so your body doesn't process them very quickly.  (I cannot describe the process in medical terms.)  The longer it takes your digestion, the better.  So, you're looking for fiber content on anything you buy.  Depending on your own body, you might do very well with a small about of carb with a meal as long as you eat it with protein (meat, chicken..) and vegetables.  When I make dinner, I make sure I also prepare vegetables I can eat and small salad stuff with oil and vinegar dressing.  Prepared dressings have added sugar - so read their labels for carbs.  Balsamic vinegar has some carbs.  So, a typical dinner for me is 1 piece of chicken (not Southern fried!), sauteed vegetables in Smart Balance (or olive oil if you prefer), a small wedge of cheddar, some salad stuff to nibble on.  I love sauteed red peppers, or green, and mushrooms.  One week I made them every night because I do like them!  Brocolli, cauliflower with melted butter or Smart Balance or cheddar.  And a glass of white wine - if you're not taking diabetes medicine.  I have never forced my family to change their diet.  If I'm making a rice dish, I serve it but I don't eat the rice.  I'll eat the rest of the meal as I described but never the rice.  For myself, I have cut out potatoes and bread because I just cannot eat them and keep good blood sugar readings.  I've tried all kinds of bread, whole berry, high fiber, etc.  Just doesn't work for me, so you have to see how your own readings are.  Moderation is the key.  Once I ate a really big meal of only good food but my readings 2 hours later were high.  I just ate too much.  We had steak, those sauteed vegetables (maybe 2 different kinds) and a salad.  Well, just eating too much at one meal will also give you high readings, so try to eat less.  Sometimes, I'll same a portion of dinner and eat it later as a snack.  In restaurants, I tell them to substitute another vegetable for the potatoes, and I always take leftovers in a box home because restaurant meals are too large.  This way of eating will become easier as you get used to it, honest!  As for a sometime dessert?  Eat a small portion of a slice of the cake after the meal if it's served and you don't want to feel left out.  I will do that if we're eating out or celebrating something.  Or, I just eat a portion of my husband's.  He's ok with that.  You can't beat yourself up or keep yourself in a cage.  Drink diet soda if you have to drink a Coke.  I was ignorant about all this until it fell into my lap but I've learned so much from going online and from the forum.  I'm much healthier now all around, so in a way it's a blessing, but I'll always be either "borderline" or a diabetic.  In my case, it's not going to go away but I can live with it.

Now, my coffee.  I wanted to reply quickly this morning while I had time.  :)

Take care, Lanie



"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds

Post Edited (lanieg) : 7/8/2007 8:30:49 AM (GMT-6)


tangerine bear
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2005
Total Posts : 941
   Posted 7/8/2007 8:57 AM (GMT -7)   
:-)   :-) Hi Amanda,
 
Yeah........ unfortunately....NO POTATOES for me LOL! First, to answer your question: " Everybody in my family is saying even if it's diabetes it's no big deal and I'm making a mountain out of a mole hill. They told me that you just watch what you eat and you will be fine. Do people really die from this?"....Complications from Diabetes can be really serious... heart disease, blindness, amputation... not trying to scare you because those things come from high sugars for a long time, but when people say it's no big deal, they just haven't taken the time to learn about diabetes. The good news is that those complications can be prevented by eating right and exercising, and taking meds if necessary. It was hard for me to accept that this had happened to me at first, but since I've been coming here, I've gotten so much help on what to eat and not eat, it's getting a lot easier. My numbers (on my meter..) are WAY down, and I was able to drop from a whole pill to a half after only one month or so on my diet.
 
Good carbs seem to differ for different people on the forum. Some can eat certain things and others can't... I have no problems with whole grain bread... I buy whole wheat diet bread with 9 carbs per slice, and I can still have a sandwich with turkey, cheese and lettuce and not spike my sugar (no chips). Also, when I was first diagnosed, someone on here posted about "Dreamfields" brand pasta... I read their website, and I've been buying that ever since. It doesn't spike my sugar at all, and I've been able to have mac and cheese, lasagna, and spagetti... thanks to that post! My family has it too, and they don't know the difference! I also have good luck with beans as a carb. As for treats... we can have treats :-) .... if you read on here a lot you will find many yummy things people recommend like Lindt dark chocolate (YUM) and Atkins Endulge bar (double YUM) and a lot more. I have skipped the cake so far, but I'm sure I could have a small slice if I was careful on the other things I eat. I still make the dreaded potatoes for my family, but I won't even take one bite... I would be afraid I'd want more LOL. I have also had a few "cheats" when we've gone out and had a small amount of rice or breading on chicken.... and it's ok to do that sometimes.
 
I know you'll do great! Take care,
 
Bear tongue
"It's a jungle out there....." 
Theme song from "Monk" by Randy Newman
 
OCD: Obsessive...Compulsive...Diabetic
 
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Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 7/8/2007 12:35 PM (GMT -7)   
Amanda,
I had some excellent diabetes educators and would like to share some of their knowledge with you.

1) Nobody can give themselves diabetes.There are lots of obese people in the world without diabetes and plenty of slender ones who develop it almost overnight. (Warren who is on byetta comes to mind. 3% body fat!)

2)Many Type 2 Diabetics are born with the tendency to develop the disease. This means that their metabolism is askew from early on and often after childhood when they achieve their adult growth (and stop playing outside and start driving everywhere) they go pre-diabetic.

If you lived 100 years ago when women did much more physical labor (just lighting the stove was about 100 calories expended!) you may never go diabetic because the amount of daily physical activity you did would balance out the calories you took in and the necessary movement of everyday life would prevent your body from becoming resistant to its own insulin. Food preparation, child care, laundry and cleaning our homes used to be much more physically strenuous than it is now. Heck! Even going to the bathroom meant a stroll across the back yard a few times a day to get to the outhouse!

The only way to counteract our food intake/energy expended imbalance is to learn to balance it back and hopefully do it without medication. Thankfully there is medication for those of us who can't fix the imbalance but that doesn't mean we can continue on eating whatever we please and expecting the pills to do magic.

You will learn that food comes in three forms. Fat, protein and carbohydrate. Whatever a food has as its major component is usually how that food is classified. When I took my classes I was shocked to find that the nutritionist classified a glass of milk as a carbohydrate! I asked about the protein and calcium and she said I could get those from cheese. It was the lactose that would impact my blood sugar and I had to be careful about that and learn to count it. This doesn't mean that I don't drink milk, it just means that I had to see milk in a different light.

Then she told me that broccoli was a carbohydrate! I'm like, "What! It's a vegetable!" So she asked me if it was a protein or a fat...? Well, duh! It's a carb! It's a great, good for you, low glycemic index carb, but it's a carb! She explained that the carbs in the vegetables are locked inside the cell walls of the plant so they took longer for our bodies to access them, but that was great because vegetables were like time-release carbs with lots of vitamins and minerals in the same package. Fruits aren't quite as great as vegetables so we eat them in moderation, but they have lots of anti-oxidants and vitamins to make up for their extra sweetness.

So in my mind I'm thinking I have to live on chicken breasts and broccoli for the rest of my life and she starts talking about fats like olive oil and avocados being great for us and even an occasional real scoop of actual ice cream... "WHAT!!! ICECREAM!!!" Hold the phone! Did I hear her right? Yes, real ice cream, one scoop once or twice a week on an evening when I don't have potatoes, rice or bread with dinner. The fat in the icecream slows down the absorption of the sugars in the stuff and cream is better for us than milk as far as lactose levels go.

Things are starting to look up... tongue So I studied and I learned and I read on the net and I shared with my fellow diabetics and pretty soon I found a workable way of life that doesn't seem all that difficult to follow. And once in a while I have real french fries (no more than 13) and sometimes I eat cake and skip the icing. I eat real dark chocolate every day for my heart (and soul), just a small piece... and I'm starting to make peace with my diabetes.

So, no matter what you find out that your body is up to you can learn to handle it. And if you go full blown diabetic you can still handle it with medication and exercise and buddies who understand and care. We will be here and we will help you thru every step of the way because someone was here to do it for us. And it will be ok. Just KOKO!!! (Keep on keepin' on...)
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class! Yours may be one of them...
==================
"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross

Post Edited (Jeannie143) : 7/8/2007 1:38:30 PM (GMT-6)


dmjain6
New Member


Date Joined Jun 2007
Total Posts : 12
   Posted 7/8/2007 4:09 PM (GMT -7)   
I just wanted to say a quick thank you!  I have been reading some other stories and how you all have handled things and it doesn't seem as scary.  I think a lot of the unknown was scary and just hearing all the bad things.  I'm so glad I found this place!  And I will keep up and continue to learn what I can from all of you!  :)
Thanks again!!
 
~Amanda~

tangerine bear
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2005
Total Posts : 941
   Posted 7/8/2007 5:56 PM (GMT -7)   
:-)  Hi Amanda,
 
I'm so glad to hear that you are feeling less anxious about all this! That's exactly how I felt when I came to this forum, but of course, my situation is a bit different than yours, I was way beyond pre-diabetic. This is the most helpful and comforting place!! Stay with us!
 
((((((((Big Hugs))))))))))),
 
Bear tongue
"It's a jungle out there....." 
Theme song from "Monk" by Randy Newman
 
OCD: Obsessive...Compulsive...Diabetic
 
                       VIEW IMAGE
 

                           


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5394
   Posted 7/8/2007 7:40 PM (GMT -7)   
Amanda, we've all written a lot of 'stuff' for you to digest.  I'm sure it's hard to absorb it all.  Remember that you yourself will have to see just what foods will drive your blood sugar up, not have any effect or raise it only slightly.  Then, you will need to adjust your diet accordingly.  As you can see, some others might eat bread or pasta, etc. and be ok with their blood sugar readings.  Or, some might take diabetes medication and may have a more varied diet.  I can't eat potatoes, or pasta or even whole grain bread because my blood sugar rises too high.  So, when you eat, be sure to keep a log of the food and then your readings 2 hours later so you will know how your blood sugar reacts to the particular food.  Sort of an on-going experiment on yourself!  Good luck
Lanie
"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


4sons
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 406
   Posted 7/9/2007 4:45 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Amanda ...

I was out of town this weekend and my just "catching up" on all the news. You've gotten GREAT advice!!!

I spent a lot of time in tears this weekend blaming myself for getting the blasted disease because during a post divorce period of INTENSE self loathing I allowed myself to gain 40 lbs, eat like a slob, and never go to the doctors. When I came out of my self induced fog I was a diabetic. Seriously, I SOBBED all the way home in the car tonight ... so sad that I did this to myself. Then I had to say, "WAIT ... this runs in my birthfamily and I didn't KNOW that until the month I was diagnosed!!!" So did I feed the beast? Yes. Did I create it? NO.

You didn't either!!!
Cheers -

Ruth/4sons

age 52/Type 2 diabetic/"controlled" by diet and exercise

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