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dolppl
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 21
   Posted 8/9/2007 5:59 PM (GMT -7)   
I just went the doctor's today with some unexplainable symptoms and she checked my blood-sugar level and didn't like what she saw so she sent me for some blood work that I will get done this week, and meet back up with her next month.  I was doing some reading on the internet and it seems like I have a lot of the symptoms for diabetes type 1 or 2 I don't know much about it.  but the last couple of days I feel real weird when I am eating at night(pasta both nights).  Very fatigued and kind of out of it.  I usually have a very healthy appetite but i couldn't finish my dinner both nights.  I don't know if this is my anxiety level or if it could have anything to do my blood sugar.  I was wondering if someone could give me some advice as to what foods to eat and what foods to stay away from, just in case it is my blood sugar for the month 'til i go back to the doctor's.  A little preventative measure.
Thank You

Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 8/9/2007 7:00 PM (GMT -7)   
Welcome to HealingWell, Dolppl,
I'm going to repost something I had in another post rather than have you go digging for it.

For myself, I have found that leaving the grains and tubers out of my food plan keeps me level, avoids lows, and best of all I'm losing pounds and inches. This means no rice, wheat, corn or potatoes (or anything made from them) most every day. I have had two ears of corn this month because if you can't have corn on the cob and you live in Michigan, life isn't worth living. (LOL!)

I usually start the day with two eggs and a slice of cheese with a piece of fruit and coffee. The fruit is the thing that gives you micronutrients and keeps your appetite happy. I use oranges, strawberries, sliced melon, all the good vitamin C fruits and no juices.

Lunch is usually left over meat from dinner or deli style cold meat (turkey, chicken, ham) along with some salad greens, raw collards, raw beet greens, raw spinach, raw zuchini, cucumbers, radishes, just about anything that grows and can be eaten raw goes into my salads. I use about a tablespoon of ranch dressing and then about two tablespoons of olive oil on my salads. This gives you the fats you need to be able to absorb the vitamin A in the greens. I also make tuna or chicken salad with real mayo and serve it over a big fat sliced tomato. (Olive oil, peanuts, peanut butter, olives and avocado are the 'good' fats that you need to keep your hunger at bay, lower your bad cholesterol and raise your HDL's.)

Dinner is meat cooked on the grill most nights,(chicken, lean pork, hamburger steaks and even pot roast!) sautéed vegetables in olive oil with chopped garlic from the jar. More salad and fruit. What I don't eat in 'starches' I make up for in vegetables. I have planted a ton of spaghetti squash and will be eating that with sauce and cheese all fall.

Night time snack is usually a banana with 2 tablespoons of peanut butter. Once a week I have a small ice cream cone with real ice cream. We need the fat in the ice cream to slow the absorption of the sugars and the cream has a high satisfaction factor as well.The cone is a very small amount of starch and helps with the portion control of the ice cream. Some nights I munch on nuts or may eat a couple of sugar-free pop cicles if it's hot out.

I will admit, eating pot roast with just carrots and salad feels weird, but I've been doing this since April and having great success with it. I'm eating no noodles, pasta, potatoes, rice, cereal, pancakes, toast or any of those other things that 'fill out' a meal. If you do this for a month you will experience a natural drop in your blood sugar without fatigue. Also, walk away from your home or work for 15 minutes then turn around and walk back and you will have your 30 minutes of daily exercise that is recommended for diabetics. Exercise enhances our ability to utilize our own insulin and works just like some of the diabetes meds. It is the singularly best thing you can do for your blood glucose after food plan control.

Hope this helps. Take care and let us know how you are doing. Regardless of your diagnosis, we will be here for you and help you along the path one step at a time.
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class! Yours may be one of them...
==================
"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


fergusc
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 230
   Posted 8/10/2007 5:09 PM (GMT -7)   

Dolppl,

First of all, you're off to a flying start simply by asking the right questions! You can improve your health enormously by following a few simple rules which will normalise your blood glucose and benefit you in so many ways.

Rule 1: The USDA food pyramid is a piece of nonsense and should be ignored. Avoid starches and carbohydrates, other than vegetables, as far as possible. Base your diet on proteins, fats and vegetables and your blood sugars will improve immediately.

Rule 2: Anyone advising a low fat diet is a charlatan and might as well have hooves and a trident. Low fat foods are devoid of important nutrients, replaced by starches and sugars which will undermine your health.

Rule 3: Regular exercise is important too. It will maintain muscle mass, metabolise body fat, keep you hormones in balance and help your insulin work more effectively.

I'll stop before I get too evangelical. We're all on a bit of a voyage of discovery here, so welcome aboard!

All the best,

fergusc 


tangerine bear
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2005
Total Posts : 941
   Posted 8/11/2007 6:13 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi Dolppl,

I also want to welcome you to the diabetes forum. I hope your blood work comes back fine, but if it shows diabetes, this is the right place to be!

You didn't mention what symptoms you are having other than the fatigue... I was wondering if there are any other symptoms?? I had all of the typical diabetes symptoms when I was diagnosed, sudden weight loss, thirst, frequent urination, etc. I knew something was wrong when I lost 10 pounds without trying... (I NEVER lose weight LOL). I was just diagnosed in April, and my numbers were truly awful at my diagnosis. I came here and got wonderful advice from all the great members, and at my 3 month checkup, my doctor couldn't believe that my blood glucose levels over the 3 months were normal! I was able to reduce my 1 pill a day to 1/2 pill very quickly also. I've been trying to follow the great advice from my diabetes buddies here, and it's made a big difference! I still have a long way to go with my cholesterol problems, but I'm a lot better than I was yeah .

Let us know how you're doing,

Bear

 


"It's a jungle out there....." 
Theme song from "Monk" by Randy Newman
 
OCD: Obsessive...Compulsive...Diabetic
 
                       VIEW IMAGE
 

                           


tutorgirl
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 235
   Posted 8/12/2007 3:58 PM (GMT -7)   
I, too, am new to this forum, but have been diagnosed Type II for about 11 years and am not yet on insulin, although I did recently start the byetta injections. about the diet...so are you basically saying to not even follow the diabetic exchange exchange diet...just eliminate all grains and starchy vegetables? I did notice that you do have squash...what about peas? And are your doctors OK with this? I am really trying to get better control and lose weight and am really interested in peoples' take on diet. I have also started exercising to help with all this.

fergusc
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 230
   Posted 8/12/2007 4:36 PM (GMT -7)   
tutorgirl,
you're a quick learner! Those are indeed the basics - eliminate the starchy carbs (bread, pasta, rice, potatoes etc.) to normailse your blood sugars. As for peas, they don't effect me too badly, but that's certainly not true for everyone. To some extent we have to find out by experimentation what does and doesn't work for each of us. And no, as a rule doctors aren't ok with this. Their teaching tells them otherwise and they are typically repeating what they've been told. I have a doctor friend who tells me she had 1 lecture on the subject of nutrition in her entire university education. 1!. I think everyone here has a great deal more experience on the cause and effect of high blood sugars and would disagree with the conventional beliefs.
Exercise is the other thing, as you say. Probably just as important as a good diet, and pretty much vital if you want to normalise your blood glucose.
All the best, and keep in touch.

fergusc

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5406
   Posted 8/12/2007 6:26 PM (GMT -7)   

Greetings Dolppl and Tutorgirl, at this point you've probably gotten a lot of advice from your doctors, friends or family and information from the Internet about diabetes.  The standard guidelines had always been to follow what the ADA (American Diabetes Assoc.) said which dictates a certain percentage of carbohydrates, protein and fats.  Following the ADA diet may not give you acceptable blood sugar readings especially if you are not on medication.  You'll find here that many of us, as Fergusc wrote, do not subscribe to those guidelines anymore.  Put very plainly, since carbohydrates like breads, cereals, potates, rice, or anything with flours or sugars (and that means natural sugar like honey or maple syrup) drive the blood sugar up, I have eliminated them from what I eat.  I eat all kinds of meats and vegetables (not the starchy ones though), some cheeses and nuts, and in this way I've been able to normalize my blood sugar by diet alone.  But every body is different and some people may be able to tolerate some amounts of carbs, so this is why you need to measure your blood sugar in order to know what foods drive your readings up or have no effect at all.

If you were feeling fatigued after a pasta meal, it was probably because of the high amount of carbs.  So, Dolppl, in your case, you might try either reducing the pasta or cutting it out.  For dinner, try a piece of meat (or chicken or fish), a couple of vegetables, a wedge of cheese, and some salad bites.  By salad bites, I mean a couple of pieces of cucumbers, a couple of radishes, small salad greens with oil and vinegar, no prepared dressings from a bottle.  Read all labels closely for their carbohydrate content.  It's surprising how often sugar or corn syrup are listed.  Fewer carbs, lower blood sugar readings.

Good luck,

Lanie 


"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


amjd
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 8/15/2007 4:01 AM (GMT -7)   
Hello, I need all the help I can get, my blood sugar was 130 at two times a month a go in a routine check. I never had any symptoms so I was shocked. My doctor said I might have pre diabetes and start metformine 500 once a day. I kept my home test and its between 110-120. I checked lab twice feasting and have reading of 112 and 120. I lost a lot of weight although am not over weighted as am not eating a lot and no carb. I am confused and scared to go back to the doctor a gain. Please give me your thoughts

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5406
   Posted 8/15/2007 4:55 AM (GMT -7)   
Hello amjd, welcome to the Forum.  I'm sure it's stressful going through all this.  First of all, don't be scared.  The more information you know about diabetes, the better off you are, so be sure to read everything you can on this forum and make lists of questions to discuss with your doctor before you see him/her again.  You can take charge of your health in the best way possible by following a sensible diet and doing some kinds of exercise daily.  The diet that you probably got from the doctor and the American Diabetes Assoc. is somewhat different from what many of us here follow, but I see that you are already eating low carb which I think is a good idea.  When you stop eating breads, cereals, rice and potatoes, you will see that your blood sugar will most likely go lower.  Eat a nice piece of protein (if you're not a vegetarian) like beef, chicken or fish with a couple of vegetables and a small salad with oil and vinegar dressing.  Instead of lettuce, you could drizzle that dressing over a few slices of cucumber.  Write down everything you eat at meals and what your blood sugar is 2 hours later and try to see what foods give you good readings or readings too high.  Don't eat a very large dinner at one sitting.  If you can't finish what's on your plate, wrap it up for the next day.  Let us know how this works out.  There are lots of other suggestions that other members here will have for you, too, so check back often, ok?
Lanie
forum moderator
 
"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


amjd
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 8/15/2007 6:10 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks Lanie, I am very overwhelmed with such forum, indeed people need to help each other. the time we are diagnosed is the worse I guess!!!!!!!!!

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5406
   Posted 8/15/2007 7:18 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi amjd, you're right about the beginning being the worst, or maybe the most confusing!  There are so many people giving advice, so much information from different sources that it's hard to digest everything.  And sometimes it seems that you hear conflicting information.  For example, people's blood sugar reacts differently to different food.  Some people can eat beans but others can't.  Beans drive my blood sugar up but maybe you can eat them.  They're a good source of protein and fiber if they don't raise your readings too high.  Also, you are on metformin and you may have different results from the food that you eat compared to what another person eats.  This is why you should keep a daily log or journal of what you eat and the time and then what your blood sugar was after eating.  In this way, you'll be able to figure out your personal eating plan.  Please discuss this with your doctor though because we are not doctors here on the Forum and cannot give you medical advice.  These are only our opinions and what works for us.  Let us know how it's going!

Lanie
forum moderator
 
"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 8/15/2007 8:20 AM (GMT -7)   
Hello new members,
 
You have been given great advice about eating by Lanie, fergusc, and others. They basically follow the eating plan developed by Dr. Richard Bernstein (The Diabetes Solution). You may be thinking that your days of enjoying carb foods are over, but you may not have to eat that low carb to maintain control. I found the plan to be too restrictive for me, although I follow the basic principles. It will be hard work and will require frequent testing in the early days, but you may well be able to enjoy some starchy foods such as peas, beans, lentils, oatmeal, barley, brown rice, and others.
 
I follow a modified version of the Insulin Resistance Diet (The Insulin-Resistance Diet : How to Turn Off Your Body's Fat-Making Machine (Paperback)
by Cheryle R. Hart M.D. (Author), Mary Kay Grossman R.D. )
 
This system teaches you how to eat carbs by linking them with proteins and fat. It works great for me. I am able to enjoy low carb yogurt, berries and other fruits, oatmeal, beans, peas, and barley, large salads made from local, fresh veggies in season, plenty of other veggies, olives, avocados, nuts, cheeses, and veggie protein foods.  I eat out frequently and am able to maintain my blood glucose control while on the road for weeks at a time.  I don't have cravings- and find I am able to walk away from the foods that used to tempt me so badly without feeling deprived. You may want to check it out , along with Bernstein and Atkins, and the glycemic index as you develop your approach to managing your diabetes. 
 
The ADA feeding plan is designed to trap you in a downward spiral of increasingly poor health and the need for more and more drug intervention as time goes on.
 
One thing that has really helped me is increasing my exercise. I do short bursts of activity ( 3 x 10-15 minutes on a treadmill) and one long session (30-45 min exercise bike) every day. I have some toning and yoga routines that are performed while seated in a chair- that I do to relieve stress.
 
The combination of diet and exercise has enabled me to drop my A1c from 15 to 5.0 (almost as good as fergusc!) in a year. 
sandy
I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


amjd
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 8/15/2007 11:42 PM (GMT -7)   
Frankly, you gave me some spirit to go to the Doctor Yesterday; he looked at my numbers and discusses my situation. He thinks am either pre diabetic or at the early stage. His advice was to ignore as much as possible the obsession of continuing testing and take care as a diabetic since the procedures are the same. He asked me to do a schedule-testing plan of twice a week and record them for the next visit.

The early stages are the most difficult as I said, but does any one think we might go back to the normal life we used to have. Sure, I am not enjoying and my family probably paying the price too. How much time you think it will take to adjust

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5406
   Posted 8/16/2007 3:55 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi amjd, as we agreed before, the beginning of all this is confusing and a little scary.  The more information you have about diabetes, the better off you'll be in taking control of your health, so read through the posts on this Forum and learn as much as you can from others who are experiencing the same thing.  It's probably true that some people become obsessive testers, especially in the beginning.  I myself tested a lot more when I was first diagnosed because I needed to find out which food raised my blood sugar and which food didn't as much.  This was how I decided to eat a very low carbohydrate diet because it was the only way for me to have normal blood sugar.  Everyone is different and you may react differently to different foods.  Do make a food journal in which you write down every thing you eat and then what your blood glucose is when you test.  If your doctor is asking you to do it twice a week, follow his instructions and show it to him the next visit.  In my opinion, you don't have to limit that to twice a week.  You want to test after you eat certain meals to know how your b.s. is, as I wrote.  Yes, changing your diet may affect family life a little bit.  What does your family normally eat everyday?  Why do you think that they are "paying the price" too?  All of us here have lots of suggestions for very good ways to make good meals the everyone can enjoy, so be sure to check back, ok?

Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
 
"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


amjd
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 8/16/2007 4:32 AM (GMT -7)   
Dear Lanie,

As we agreed the beginning is the worst, I am still under shock that is why I think my family is surfing. Until this two months I was active all day long, looking forward to go home for my two kids (girl 3yrs and sun 2yrs) to play and go out and enjoy along with my wife. Work was difficult without the stress of sickness. I been supporting my family all my life and feel very week now, I have five sisters, 3 brothers, of which I been supporting financially and none financially. I am the big brother that every one relay on, my father been a way all my life and my mother died of cancer 9 years a go.

I hardly now playing with my kids, have no interest in going out. My wife is obsessed now with my food and wake up early to prepare food that I can eat at work

I know from all I read that this will go a way and I have the chance to live normal productive life, but this knowledge did not stop my depression yet, which even scared me more. Am not also doing the work I used to do, I feel very lazy and my mind in something els. I feel I was strong all my life and now I feel weak.

LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5406
   Posted 8/16/2007 5:15 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi amjd, you have many people in your family who depend on you and I think feeling responsible for them is making you feel depressed if you feel your health is changing.  This is more complicated than just your blood sugar.  I hope you have some way to get advice about taking care of these other feelings.  Maybe you can discuss this with your doctor, a family member, a clergyman or a trusted friend?   There is also a Depression forum here; maybe you can find some advice there if you post some questions.  The good news is that your glucose numbers are not critical.  (I am not a doctor.  This is my opinion from experience.)  Even so, I'm sure with a little change of diet and with the medication you take that you can improve your fasting glucose.  How have you changed your diet?  Please do not think this is the end of the world!  Think positively!  It's fortunate that you are aware of a potential health problem now so you can avoid health problems in the future.  What do you eat everyday? 
Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
 
"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds

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