am I or not? Still confused?

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mamo
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 52
   Posted 8/30/2007 8:19 AM (GMT -7)   
My husband has been so good as to say," Debbie does that have to much sugar, or can you eat this, or what can you eat?" He's so good at this but then turns around and say, "you don't have diabetes, you just need to learn how to eat, they will take you off the meds, you'll see"
Although the Dr has never said "you have diabetes" he has put me on meds, got me an appointment with a dietician, and siad we will look at numbers in 3 months."
What does this say to you all?
I wonder why my hubbt wants to be in denial? Is he afraid ?
I can't quite figue it out? What do you all think?
about what the Dr hasn't said and about my hubby? I am new, still confused myself and don't know if I am or if I am not a diabetic. My hc reading was 6.1 and my fasting readings in the morn had went from 124 at dr's office to 167 when they put me on medsconfused
Appreciate any input PLEASE
also I am so tired today I mean I can lay my head down on the desk right now and go to sleep. Is this part of it? I am not usually this way
sleep apenia, restless legs, IBS, PLM, high blood sugar, chronic depression, anxiety,
Trazadone 1oomg, requip 3mg, Effexor xr 75mg,Dyazide, aprazolam when needed, cpap machine, lipitor, METFORMIN 1000mg daily
Fibromyalgia
 
 


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 8/30/2007 9:03 AM (GMT -7)   
mamo
 
Metformin will not make your BG levels go up. Metformin helps your liver to make less glucose from proteins and fats to meet your metabolic needs, and it causes your insulin resistance to decrease, so that you can better use the glucose that you ingest and that it makes- it makes your cells more likely to take in glucose from the blood- so it lowers your blood glucose levels two ways. (Make less glucose and suck glucose out of the blood.) It takes a couple of weeks for it to kick in fully. Your bg numbers will fluctuate from day to day, so you can't draw any conclusions from two isolated readings with a machine that is 10-20% inaccurate.
 
Your A1c of 6.1 says that your average blood glucose level is about 123 - anything over 125 is considered to be diabetic. The A1c results can have a variance of up to 10 percent depending on the lab and the machine they use so you could easily be in a definitely diabetic range. You really need to find out what your lab considers to be a normal, non-diabetic level.  For example, in my own hospital lab, any A1c under 6.0 is considered to be non-diabetic (but still pre-diabetic)- so if you had your bloodwork analyzed there, your report would say DIABETIC. Most folks without diabetes have A1c's in the 4.7-5.5 range. Their blood sugar ranges from 70-95 with 84 being the median. Yours is higher.
 
If your doctor has put you on meds and sent you to a dietitian, the handwriting is on the wall. Your wonderful husband is probably trying to make you feel better by saying those things to you. Mine surely did when I was diagnosed and the poor guy had no idea how to deal with the idea of his wife losing her eyesight or her limbs. With diet and exercise, you may be able to lower your blood glucose levels enough to go off medications, but you will always have diabetes. You will always have to manage your blood sugar and it WILL change over the years because our body becomes less efficient at performing its functions as we age- even if we have perfect control over those numbers.
 
You can help yourself and your husband by taking him to the dietitian and the diabetes classes with you.
Good luck and good health as you begin your journey to better control.
sandy
I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5403
   Posted 8/30/2007 9:25 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi Mamo, sometimes family might not understand a lot about diabetes for different reasons.  Some might not want to face health issues so they live in denial as you say.  That's when their problem can end up being part of your problem.  Being in denial is one way to face the unknown.  You have to explain why you cannot eat this or that.  He can eat it because his body processes it normally (well, probably - has he tested his own blood glucose?), but your body can't.  That's simple, so you eat what you can and you take meds.  No one should make a big deal out of it.  Do you have diabetes or don't you?  Some doctors will say "borderline" or "prediabetic" - mostly terms used many years ago - if the blood sugar readings are under a certain number.  So, what's the definition of "diabetic"?  Someone who uses insulin?  Someone who uses other medicine like metformin to help control the blood sugar?  Someone who uses diet to control it?  What about someone who's insulin resistant?   I think it's beside the point to quibble on a name.  The point is all of us who fit into those categories have impaired pancreas that do not fuction the way it's supposed to.  So, maybe your doctor uses his own definition as to what "diabetic" means.  You know that if you don't watch what you eat (a lot of carbs) or don't take your meds that your blood sugar will go very high.  That will cause organ damage over a long period of time.  Arguing whether you name that as "diabetic" is pointless.  You need to explain to your husband that this is going to be a new lifelong way of eating and to stop being obsessed with what you can't eat and if you learn what to eat you'll be off meds.    (Of course, I mean this should be a conversation, not an argument!)  In my house, it's not a big deal in the least.  They know it's my new way of eating; they do eat their carbs and I don't.  We make food for everyone and not everyone eats everything on the table.  Fortunately, we don't have young children!

about being tired, this can be attributed to many things:  your sleep, your meds, low blood sugar, fibromyalgia or other conditons going on in your life. Monitor your blood sugar.  Speak to your doctor about your fatigue if it continues and is out of the ordinary.  Check back with us.  :) 


Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
 
"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


mamo
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 52
   Posted 8/30/2007 10:12 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks so much, I really like you all, all of you have been so helpfull and I will learn I know what I have, and I have to live with it. I think allot has to due with me being sleepy. I also know that even though my husband will not say it, he is scared and he don't want to loose me. He has been real helpfull and helps me allot.
Once I get things under control I will be ok
Thanks again
Hugs to you all
sleep apenia, restless legs, IBS, PLM, high blood sugar, chronic depression, anxiety,
Trazadone 1oomg, requip 3mg, Effexor xr 75mg,Dyazide, aprazolam when needed, cpap machine, lipitor, METFORMIN 1000mg daily
Fibromyalgia
 
 


gelchick
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 477
   Posted 8/31/2007 8:27 AM (GMT -7)   
mamo
 
If it is the case that you husband is worried about losing you, then taking him to the classes and to your doctor visits can go a long way towards putting his mind at ease. I talked to my husband about this last night after reading your post.
 
After my diagnosis and trip to the ER, my husband underwent behavior changes. He started to treat me like an invalid mother rather than his usual wife. He saw me as fragile and he was withdrawn. Our s e x life went down the tubes. I was afraid he was having an affair- he was afraid I was going to die on him. Neither was true.
 
I was having enough problems adjusting to the diagnosis and talked to my doctor about him. My doctor called him in and talked to him. She suggested that we go to the dietitian and the CDE together (which we did). He comes to my appointments with me and she explains how I'm doing to both of us.  This has helped him to overcome a lot of his fears.  I don't tell him about every little ache and pain I have because that sets his mind off.
 
I try to maintain our lives as close as possible to before the diagnosis. I bake his favorite cookies and such, I make the same meals (adjusted for starchy carbs). We celebrate the holidays with our family traditions (and food). I always try one new dish at Christmas and Thanksgiving - so now it's a low carb treat that I can enjoy. I cherish the presence of my children and friends- the food is and always has been secondary to me. We go to concerts and football games. ALL our NORMAL stuff. I just don't drink beer or margaritas and stuffed bread anymore! This has helped him to calm down.
sandy
I just want to live happily ever after-every now and then. Jimmy Buffett

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