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tarby
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2007
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 9/6/2007 4:28 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi, I've been T2 for 3 years.  Was on metformin for 2.5 years and had to discontinue because I became allergic to corn fillers used in it.  Bg numbers went wildly out of control and was at 26 (CAN).  I decided to try and control with diet, exercise and supplements.  It's been a full month now and I'm getting bg's in the 5's and 6's with some higher ones at 10.  I'm happy with the progress and working much harder at fighting diabetes now then I ever have.  I'm looking forward to getting to know more about this disease as I continue to fight it with everything I've got.
 
Tarby

Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 9/6/2007 7:49 PM (GMT -7)   
Welcome Tarby,

Welcome to HealingWell. Always glad to make a new friend but sorry for the reason. I have probably been a T2 for 30 years but the numbers that they use to diagnose have been dropped in the last 10 yrs or so and that's when I was diagnosed. I've had a number of different meds and am presently using metformin and Lantus insulin at night (but not every night.)

Since April I have stopped eating all grain based foods as well as potatoes. I call it the "nothing white except cauliflower" food plan. My husband calls it the 'cave woman' food plan. In that time I know I have lost 30 lbs and probably more but I don't own a scale and have been on vacation so I havn't gotten over to the YMCA to weigh myself. I've been getting up to excellent numbers in the mornings and have actually been able to skip my Lantus some nights as well as cut back on my metformin as well.

Everyone here tries to be very helpful so you can ask questions about just about anything that has to do with Diabetes. If you read back in the past posts you will find all kinds of good stuff to read and learn.

Take care.
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class! Yours may be one of them...
==================
"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


fergusc
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 230
   Posted 9/7/2007 10:04 AM (GMT -7)   

Welcome aboard, Tarby.

I think you're doing exactly the right thing by using your diet and exercise regime to combat diabetes. This will make an enormous difference to your condition. I have Type 1 diabetes, and have to use insulin as a result, but since I changed my lifestyle, I've reduced my needs to around 25% of my former use! With the reduced insulin came reduced body weight and greater health and fitness. I've been exercising and following a low-carb diet for 7 years now and every aspect of my health is better as a result. If you still need medication once you have tried your lifestyle changes, you will certainly need much less and quite possibly none at all if you're Type 2.

More and more people on the forum are trying these changes now, and I think pretty much all of them are enjoying much better health.

So you've come to the right place I think.

All the best,

fergusc


tutorgirl
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 235
   Posted 9/7/2007 10:28 AM (GMT -7)   
Welcome, Tarby,

Let me add an amen to what Fercusc and Jeannie have said. I am fairly new to this forum myself. I was so impressed with what was being said here that I immediately implemented the principles of low carb eating and exercise. I have seen so much improvement in my blood glucose numbers and my blood pressure numbers. I have blood work done next week so I will be really interested in seeing what those say. I've lost weight, too, which with T2 is essential. This is a great forum. If you have questions people go out of their way to find the answers for you. And they are extremely supportive. I'm on a couple of others and this is by far my favorite! Check in often and let us know how you are doing.

Karen

tarby
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2007
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 9/8/2007 5:49 PM (GMT -7)   
Thank you so much for all your responses. I really appreciate the positive reaction. In other forums I've felt very chastised for choosing diet, exercise and supplements over medication, when what really matters to me is that what I'm doing IS working. I've realized that diabetes is a very personal disease and needs to battled in a personal manner, one that makes sense to the individual, whichever way that is. I won't ever push "my way" on anyone else. So I really, truly appreciate your support and comments. Thank you! :)

Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 9/11/2007 7:43 AM (GMT -7)   
Tarby,
Actually, if your way works we'd rather that you "push it" on us so we can learn from your experience. Some of us are block heads (I'm a prime example!) and it sometimes takes a lot of persuasion to get us to try new things. I used to believe in "all things in moderation" until I had to stop taking my Avandia for $$$ reasons. That was when I was forced to make some huge dietary changes to cut my sugars down.

Yes, it's weird to have eggs and cheese with an orange for breakfast. Sometimes salads without croutons or bread sticks feels like a day without sunshine... and I truly miss mashed potatoes!!! sad but I'm surviving much better without them. For some reason, those of us who are overweight have the hardest time giving up the grain based foods, but for most diabetics that seems to be the key to glucose control.

One of the studies that I read about online (can't remember where just now) stated that dietary control vs. medication control for Type2's was better for the arteries and organs in the long run. Seems that the med doses can be raised to accomplish low numbers if we are eating too much and this is hard on the body. Starting at the source, by not putting excessive caloric foods into the mouth to begin with, we lower our needs for meds and our bodies do much better in the long run.

The reason I am so adamant about maintaining control is that I've seen diabetics become disabled and end up as burdens on their families simply because they couldn't stop putting the wrong foods in their mouths. I may become blind eventually, or I may face an amputation as I age with this disease, but I won't go there on purpose! I will fight every step of the way to do what I need to optimize my health as best I can. I look on my prolonged good health as a gift to my adult children. They have all said that they would care for me if my diabetes makes me dependent and I appreciate that, but i don't want to take advantage of their gracious kindness.

So I KOKO! (Keep on keepin' on!)
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class! Yours may be one of them...
==================
"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5394
   Posted 9/11/2007 9:40 AM (GMT -7)   

Tarby, Karen, Jeannie and Fergusc, amen to all you've said.  I wish I had been enlightened years ago, but it doesn't help to feel sorry about ignorance then.  The doctors whom we all trusted didn't raise the warning flag probably because their idea of "normal" blood sugar was too high as we now know.  As long as I can keep my numbers under control with diet, I'm happy to do so.  (And, yes, I miss bread,too.)  I just got back from visiting an old roommate whose mother is a "diet-controlled diabetic".  I asked her what her readings were and she didn't know.  She said a nurse takes her blood once a month and doesn't tell her.  She has no diet to follow other than just to eat "moderately".  At lunch, she had mashed potatoes with gravy with her chicken, and a roll.  Later on I expressed a little concern to my friend who said that, well, all she knew was that the nurse didn't want to upset her mother.  Her mother is 80.  What can you do?

Tarby, what supplements do you take?


Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
 
"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds


LanieG
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 5394
   Posted 9/12/2007 6:40 PM (GMT -7)   
Jeannie, about what you said in your post about dietary control vs. medication control for type 2's:  I totally agree because I fall into that category, and so far it's working for me.  A person who is newly diagnosed may benefit with trying a no- or low-carb diet to see if he can indeed control his blood sugar first without meds.  Or, a type 2 on meds, especially someone overweight, might also see improvements following this diet and losing weight.  In this case, I think the combination of very low carb diet (or no carb) and weight loss might allow that person to either reduce the medication or eliminate it under his doctor's supervision.  Of course, testing his blood sugar is always extremely important.  The problem as I see it, though, is adhering to the new diet.  It is restrictive.  It's not a diet plan of eating "in moderation".  It's not a question of just cutting out dessert after dinner or the second piece of toast in the morning.  If a person cannot or will not follow the no/low-carb diet consistently, or his pancreas just is not producing enough insulin, then the diet will not keep his blood sugars down and he might have to go on meds in any case.   Another important factor is the amount of food eaten.  If a person eats too much of even the best foods on the no/low carb lists, his blood sugar will still rise.  So, it's not only what we eat but how much.  I was surprised to discover that I am not as hungry in between meals now that I'm eating this way.  Can it be that all the carbs actually make us more hungry?  I don't  know.  In any case, I'm glad we can express different points of view here regarding how we handle diabetes.  It's complex.     
:-)



Lanie
forum moderator - diabetes
 
"pre-diabetic" controlled so far by diet and exercise
following low/no carb diet, no meds

Post Edited (lanieg) : 9/12/2007 7:50:12 PM (GMT-6)


Jeannie143
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 9/13/2007 11:53 AM (GMT -7)   
I might be able enlighten you a bit on the 'hunger' thing. Starches signal our body to release insulin into the blood stream. With normals the insulin quickly moves the glucose (formerly starch) molecules into the cells and often there is excess insulin around to cause a deep drop in blood sugar. This signals hunger. This is why restaurants give you breadsticks before dinner, to make you hungry! The rapid rise and fall of blood glucose is regulated by the insulin levels.

In Type2's the insulin is there, the glucose from the starches is present in the blood stream, but with insulin resistance the glucose can't get into the cells. The cells send out hunger signals because they really are starving for nutrients. The glucose is just outside their cell membranes and they can't access it. In the mean time the body converts the excess blood glucose to fat for use later, thinking the body doesn't need it just now. And our cells are still screaming with hunger so we think we must eat more. Also, increased fat also increases insulin resistance so the problem spirals ever upward in a cycle of cell hunger = increased food intake = more fat formation = higher insulin resistance = more cell hunger.

When we remove many of the starches from the food plan there is a more level release of our own insulin because there are fewer starches to signal insulin release. The natural drop in calories resulting from this dietary change signals the body to use body fat for cellular energy needs. This is why it's necessary to watch the amount of nuts and fruits consumed if weight loss is one of the goals.

Anywaaay, the level insulin response that is created by a low carb food plan prevents the steep rises and sharp drops in insulin that can initiate the hunger response in the brain. Because there is less excess blood sugar there is a switch from fat formation to fat burning for fuel. This signals a sort of calming effect on the hunger center in the brain. Some of this is as a result of ketosis and some is as a result of lowered insulin response which in turn lowers insulin resistance.

This is my very simplified take on the whole low carb/low hunger thing. It's not totally scientifically accurate but I'm trying to keep it simple.
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
~Please remember that 50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class! Yours may be one of them...
==================
"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."
- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross

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