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michbud
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2003
Total Posts : 118
   Posted 4/8/2005 1:41 PM (GMT -7)   
Well it only took 2 days for me to have 6 seizures in the hospital while video taping and electronically monitoring them. He comes in and says I have good news.... "You don't have epilepsy"
Now I am just staring at him like what are you saying????? He then explains, "your test show that you dont sleep, we have had 3 people on this floor having the same test and none of them have epilepsy.They are a form of non epileptic seizures. Usually dianosed as BYPOLOR , stress, depression, so when you get home make an apt with your neuro and he will refer you to a phyciatrist who can test and monitor meds.So I have done all I can do, good luck."
And he left.....Now I have had test, been on so many diffrent meds, and diagnosed with epilepsy for 15yrs. So now I am were I started 15 yrs ago..... Except  I dont know what bypolor is.
So that is my news...... I am so confused!!!!!
many huggggggggggssssssssssssssssss.............................
                                                    michelle

RanMan
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 665
   Posted 4/8/2005 3:34 PM (GMT -7)   
Michelle,
Some of the symptoms of Bi-Polar to wach for are:
....paranoia.......aggresive and/or violent behavior.......no respect........no motivation...........no initiative.......always wants to sleep......very religious(more than usual)....kind hearted(more than usual)....sometimes dual personality........poor eating habits......spending money just for the sake of spending...talking very religious......RAPID CYCLING (constantly talking, sometimes not making any sence (won't shut up).........always seeking attention..... etc.
 
 
Very often kids get into trouble with the law etc. and everybody is quick to call him a bad kid when it is an undiagnosed medical problem that can be treated with meds.
 
From past experience from a family member who has bipolar/manic depression, I can say that, Usually the manic phase PEAKS in the spring and starts around Easter weekend, Here's my reasoning:(I'm not in the medical proffession, this is only from my own experiences)
 
Easter Sunday follows the lunar caledar, it falls on the first Sunday after the first full moon after the first day of spring.
Since the body is mostly made of water - the moon and sun control the tides so it must affect the body.
 
Randy

Diagnosed with epilepsy and ulcerative colitis in 1979,
Been on meds ever since.
 
275mg-dilantin/day
120mg-pheonobarb/day
3,000mg-Mesasol/day


kayakmom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2003
Total Posts : 585
   Posted 4/8/2005 8:36 PM (GMT -7)   
MIchelle I am so sorry this happened. I hope your neuro can help you. Was he in any doubt of your epilepsy DX? IF not push for answers. TO me it is rather suspect when all 3 patients in for the testing ALL turned up Bipolar during VEEG.....there are seizures too deep to be caught on the EEG, there are also many who end up with misdiagnosis.

Have you previously had abnormal EEG?


Hang in there!
Ginny

RanMan
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 665
   Posted 4/10/2005 12:31 PM (GMT -7)   

Michelle,

You said that you don't know what bipolar is?

Try this web site, this should answer your questions.

Bipolar Disorder

Provided by A.D.A.M., Inc.

<!--Do nothing with titleabbrev for now--><!--do nothing with article info for now--><!--do nothing with abstract for now--><!--do nothing with article info for now--><!--put comment to force the end tag of span-->Definition <!--parent is section-->

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Bipolar disorder is a chronic disease affecting over 2 million Americans at some point in their lives. The American Psychiatric Association's "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" describes two types of bipolar disorder, type I and type II.

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In type I (formerly known as manic depressive disorder), there has been at least one full manic episode. However, people with this type may also experience episodes of major depression.

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In type II disorder, periods of "hypomania" involve more attenuate (less severe) manic symptoms that alternate with at least one major depressive episode. When the patients have an acute exacerbation, they may be in a manic state, depressed state, or mixed state.

<!--put comment to force the end tag of span-->Causes, incidence, and risk factors <!--parent is section-->

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Everyone feels "blue" at one time or another, or "good" at other times. People who suffer from bipolar disorder, however, have pathological mood swings from mania to depression, with a pattern of exacerbation and remission that are sometimes cyclic.

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The manic phase is characterized by elevated mood, hyperactivity, over-involvement in activities, inflated self-esteem, a tendency to be easily distracted, and little need for sleep. The manic episodes may last from several days to months.

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In the depressive phase, there is loss of self-esteem, withdrawal, sadness, and a risk of suicide. While in either phase, patients may abuse alcohol or other substances which worsen the symptoms.

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The disorder appears between the ages of 15 and 25, and it affects men and women equally. The exact cause is unknown, but it is a disturbance of areas of the brain which regulate mood. There is a strong genetic component. The incidence is higher in relatives of people with bipolar disorder.

<!--put comment to force the end tag of span-->Symptoms <!--parent is section-->

  • Alternating episodes of mania and depression (may only have episodes of mania, if Bipolar type I)
<!--parent is para-->

In the manic phase the following symptoms can be seen:

  • Increase in goal-directed activities (either socially or at work)
  • Increased energy
  • Distractibility
  • Flight of ideas or subjective experience that thoughts are racing
  • Inflated self-esteem or grandiosity
  • Increased involvement in activities that may be pleasurable, but may have dire consequences (e.g., spending sprees)
  • Decreased need for sleep (person feels rested after 3 hours of sleep)
  • Patient may be more talkative than usual or may feel pressured to speak
  • Easily agitated or irritated
  • Lack of self-control
<!--parent is para-->

In hypomanic episodes, symptoms are similar, but fewer and/or less intense. Delusions, (false beliefs based on incorrect information about external reality) if present, may be congruent with mood (such as delusions of grandeur, or a sense of special powers and abilities).

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In the depressive phase patients may experience:

  • Persistent sadness and depressed mood
  • Feelings of hopelessness, worthlessness, pessimism, and "emptiness"
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in activities that were once enjoyed, including sex
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Psychomotor retardation or agitation
  • Withdrawal
  • Feelings of guilt and worthlessness
  • Fatigue
  • Overwhelming sluggishness
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions
  • Loss of appetite and/or weight loss, or overeating and weight gain
  • Thoughts of death or suicide
<!--parent is para-->

If delusions are present, they may be congruent with mood (such as delusions of worthlessness or accusing voices). In "atypical depression," patients sleep more than usual and have increased appetite.

<!--put comment to force the end tag of span-->Signs and tests <!--parent is section-->

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A psychiatric history of mood swings, and observation of current behavior and mood are important in the diagnosis of this disorder. A family history of manic-depressive illness may be present. A physical examination may be performed to rule out physical causes for the symptoms or potentially drug-induced symptoms.

<!--put comment to force the end tag of span-->Treatment <!--parent is section-->

<!--parent is para-->

Hospitalization may be required during an acute phase to control the symptoms and to ensure safety of individuals. Medications to alleviate acute symptoms may include: neuroleptics (antipsychotics), antianxiety agents (such as benzodiazepines), and antidepressant agents.

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Mood stabilizers, such as lithium carbonate, and anticonvulsants (including carbamazepine and valproic acid) are started as maintenance therapy to relieve symptoms and to prevent relapse.

<!--parent is para-->

Although medications form the basis of treatment for bipolar disorders, patients and families benefit from educational and supportive interventions that promote symptom management and adequate coping skills. As with other mental disorders, patients and families benefit from joining a support group where members share common experiences and problems.

<!--put comment to force the end tag of span-->Support Groups <!--parent is section-->

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As mentioned before, the patients and families often can be helped by joining a support group where members share common experiences and problems.

<!--put comment to force the end tag of span-->Expectations (prognosis) <!--parent is section-->

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For some people, treatment with lithium or (more recently) anticonvulsant mood stabilizers have successfully prevented recurrence of symptoms. However, outcome may be different between individuals, some will experience "rapid cycling" or frequent acute episodes. In some cases, medication regimens are difficult to tolerate, reducing compliance and increasing risk of relapse.

 

Randy


Diagnosed with epilepsy and ulcerative colitis in 1979,
Been on meds ever since.
 
275mg-dilantin/day
120mg-pheonobarb/day
3,000mg-Mesasol/day

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