I wonder if this works???

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MT Lady
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   Posted 3/19/2009 9:42 AM (GMT -7)   
A friend of mine sent me this article. I have no personal experience with this, but I thought I'd share it because after reading it, it just sounds like it just may help us. I hope it is okay for me to paste it here.
Miriam
Myofascial Release Therapy

By Karen Lee Richards

Myofascial Release Therapy is a treatment option that many people are not aware of.  It is a hands-on type of therapy that is particularly effective for fibromyalgia and can be quite helpful for many other types of chronic pain as well. 
What It Is
To understand what Myofascial Release Therapy is, it's important to know what fascia is.  Fascia is the connective tissue that surrounds, supports and stabilizes every muscle, bone, organ, nerve, blood vessel and cell in the body.  It forms a continuous web from head to toe.  Think of a piece of raw chicken.  Between the skin and the meat you'll find a layer of thin white tissue – that is the fascia.  
The fascia is normally fluid and moves easily, but when there is an injury, the fascia constricts to protect the injured area.  Usually when the injury heals, the fascia relaxes and goes back to its normal state.  However, sometimes it can get bound up and create a three-dimensional pull or drag throughout the whole body.  Therefore, a fascial strain in one area of the body can cause pain in multiple other areas.  This often happens with a chronic pain disorder like fibromyalgia.  Although the original restriction may have begun in one part of the body, the pull from that one restriction can cause connected tissues to become constricted, eventually spreading throughout the body. 
How It Works
Myofascial Release Therapy applies very gentle sustained pressure to various parts of the body in order  to release the fascia so it can once again move fluidly.  A Myofascial Release Therapy session will often begin with what is called tractioning.   The therapist may lift your legs slightly by your heels, holding them with a sustained gentle pull for several minutes.  This is generally felt into the low back, and when held long enough, will cause the fascia to  begin to release all the way into the shoulders and neck.  A similar type of traction may then be applied to your neck and shoulders as well.  Because fascia is three-dimensional, the effects of Myofascial Release Therapy techniques will usually be felt wherever the fascia is most constricted. 


Following the tractioning, the therapist will begin gently moving the skin back and forth on various parts of the body (i.e., back, shoulders, hips) to identify the fascial restrictions.  When a restriction is located, a cross-hand technique of gentle manipulation is applied to release it.  Since fascia is layered and must be released in layers, this cross-hand release technique is used to release restrictions in progressive layers. 


When the fascia has been restricted for a long time, as is usually the case with fibromyalgia patients, it may take several weekly therapy sessions before the fascia holds the release long term. 

My Experience I first learned about Myofascial Release Therapy ten years ago when a lady I worked with told me about her massage therapist who had been helping some fibromyalgia patients.  When she told him about me, he offered to give me a free treatment if I'd like to try it.  I was extremely skeptical.  My body was so sensitive that my clothes hurt.  The idea of someone massaging me did not sound pleasant.  But since it was free, I figured it couldn't hurt to at least give him a call.  When we talked, I was so impressed with his knowledge of fibromyalgia that I decided to give his treatment a shot.  
Much to my surprise, not only was the therapy tolerable, it actually felt good!  When he finished the first session, I felt more relaxed than I had in years.  I couldn't wait until the next treatment.  Even if it didn't help my fibromyalgia, I thought the relaxation I felt was worth it.  But thankfully, it did help my fibromyalgia – a lot.  When I began Myofascial Release Therapy, I had been using a cane for over a year and getting steadily worse.  I was afraid it might not be long before I would be in a wheelchair.  After two months of weekly Myofascial Release Therapy sessions, I put the cane away and haven't used it since. 
Who Does It?
Myofascial Release Therapy may be offered by massage therapists, physical therapists, physiatrists, osteopaths, or chiropractors.  However, when it comes to body-wide fascial restriction such as those experienced by fibromyalgia patients, I tend to lean toward massage therapists because they are usually the only ones who are willing and able to spend the extended time needed (usually an hour per session) to treat the whole body.  Make sure the therapist you choose has special certification in Myofascial Release Therapy. 


It's also important to know that there is another technique that is sometimes also referred to as Myofascial Release Therapy.  It is a deep tissue therapy, called rolfing, which can be very painful.  Be sure when you ask about Myofascial Release Therapy that you specify you want the very gentle method. 

––––––––––––––––––

Source:  Personal interview with Myofascial Release Therapist, Richard Morgan, LAC, LMT, CNT.  3/17/09. 

© Karen Lee Richards 2009

Last Updated 03/17/09


Fibromyalgia, Osteoarthritis, scoliosis, back problems, hypothyroidism.


Statgeek
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   Posted 3/19/2009 10:34 AM (GMT -7)   
I've heard of this. Are you going to try it?

MT Lady
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Date Joined Jul 2008
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   Posted 3/19/2009 10:55 AM (GMT -7)   
I would love to try it but I know my insurance doesn't pay for massage therapy or acupuncture. I'm going to see my rheumy in a few weeks and I will talk to him, to see if I can get a "prescription" for it??? I would love to know if anyone has tried it and if it worked. It sure sounds like it would, but I've been down that road before...

Fibromyalgia, Osteoarthritis, scoliosis, back problems, hypothyroidism.


Marlee2
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   Posted 3/19/2009 11:11 AM (GMT -7)   
Miriam, I had not heard of this method but I was going to a girl for awhile that was trained in MPS and she must have used the rolfing method. After an hour of her working to release the knots on my back I would be sick for a few days after from all the toxins she was releasing into my body. I switched back to another girl that had a gentler method but I haven't had a massage now in months. I never think about it til someone brings up massage on here, that's the way my brain works or doesn't work. I added it to my to do list cause I could sure use a gentle massage. tongue
 
I would be willing to try that method if I found someone in the area that does it. With the trigger points or knots from the fascia they can have a domino affect throughout your body causing more and more knots. That is what has happened to me, I use to just have them on my back and shoulder blades and now have them all over my body. I have read about methods of massage where they find the original knot and release it (don't ask me how they can find the original one) and that in turn helps the others. I can't imagine what my body would feel like without all the knots and the tightness in the muscles from the knots. The massages I do get feel good but they have no permanent affect on them.
 
Thanks for sharing that with us.
 
luv and hugs
Marlee
Forum Moderator Fibromyalgia
 
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pattipanda
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Date Joined Jan 2009
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   Posted 3/19/2009 11:29 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi Miriam,

A good friend of mine is my massage therapist.  If you don't mind I'm going to copy and paste this into an email to her.  She's a true believer in FMS and has LOTS of Fibro patients.  She a certified massage therapist and I think not only would it be helpful to me and several people that she treats but might be a good way for her to earn some extra income.

I just had a massage ( I try to get one every month or so ).  I always feel a lot better afterwards.  But when I had this massage we noticed that I'm having some bad siatic (sp?) tightness.  She recommended that I see my doctor about it, because of my lumbar injury, GREAAAAT.. sounds like big bucks to me!!  Man, its expensive to fall apart!!!

Thanks for sharing this.


Patti
 
Fibormyalgia, 4x Lyme Disease Survivor, Depression, Anxiety Disorder, Dyslexia, 2 Lumbar Disk Herniations, Allergies, Bi-lateral Carpal Tunnel, Psoriasis. 
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solar powered
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Date Joined Nov 2007
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   Posted 3/19/2009 1:57 PM (GMT -7)   
I did myofascial release therapy for about three months with a physical therapist who was specially trained in the method taught by John Barnes. My hip/back problems were pretty severe so he didn't work on my whole body, just those parts. It took awhile but it did help loosen things up and I started feeling better. It could be uncomfortable at times but I was never sore afterwards. I bet he was though because it was a lot of work on his part. I wish I could have gone longer with it but situation didn't allow. I did get a script for it from my pcp so insurance covered it since a pt was doing it. Sessions lasted about an hour. I would definitely try it if you can. Right now I'm working with a chiro who is a rehab specialist and trained in a therapy called active release technique(ART) which reminds me of a cross between trigger point release therapy and passive range of motion. Sounds odd and it can be uncortable at times but has been very effective for me. When I first started with him I couldn't walk a block without stabbing pain in my hip with each step. It took awhile but now I can go an hour on the treadmill(he doesn't want me walking on the snow and ice) with minimal to no pain. In a perfect world I would do ART and myofascial release at the same time but we all know there is no such place so I do what I can. Lisa Oh my chiro also does a therapy called Graston which is very effective in breaking up scar tissue and fascia restrictions.
Life is the ultimate contact sport. Train accordingly and play hard.


Marlee2
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Date Joined Aug 2007
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   Posted 3/20/2009 8:40 AM (GMT -7)   
I made an app yesterday for a massage and the girl that usually does them was booked til the end of May. They now have a man that has 20 yrs experience and trained in MPS and fibro so I made an app with him for next Wed. Okay, I have never had a massage by a man and it does make me feel a little uncomfortable so do any of you have male massage therapist???
 
luv and hugs
Marlee
Forum Moderator Fibromyalgia
 
Fibro,Sjogrens, Anxiety, Gastroparesis, IBS, Gastritis, Allergies, High Blood Pressure, Low Blood Sodium and Osteoarthritis
 
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leemadd
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Date Joined Sep 2008
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   Posted 3/20/2009 2:04 PM (GMT -7)   
Wahoo Marlee you go girl.. I think that I would feel very uncomfortable with that. He may be the best but Im not sure if I could relax enough to enjoy the massage. Wish I could be more positive for you but I just cant be on this one. Before you decide to keep the appointment I would think real hard on wether or not it is going to make you better or worse. If you can not relax it might be worse If you can get to a place where you can relax I would go.
LeeAnn

MT Lady
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Date Joined Jul 2008
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   Posted 3/20/2009 6:11 PM (GMT -7)   
I think LeeAnn's advice is spot on! And, I feel exactly the same way. I'm way too insecure about how I look and I would be so darn tense from having a man seeing me in my underwear! I know, he could probably care less with an old lady like me, but I don't think I could get beyond my insecurities. Marlee, if it doesn't bother you, then go for it girl! How lucky that you found someone with that experience. I think I am going to do some research and see if I can find someone, well for me, a woman lol.
Miriam

Fibromyalgia, Osteoarthritis, scoliosis, back problems, hypothyroidism.


Marlee2
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Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 6067
   Posted 3/21/2009 8:48 AM (GMT -7)   
I brought it up to Ken that I was having a massage by a man and I figured he would say, "no way", but he didn't say anything. I have always had male doctors that have seen me inside and out. If I wasn't so embarrassed about my body I don't think it would bother me as much. I may be passing up someone that can do me some good if I cancel it so I think I will give it a try. I would think with 20 years of experience he is going to be very professional about the whole thing and not pay attention to my body as a body but muscles that need work done on them. I mean who gets the most massages anyway, probably women. If I feel too uncomfortable I won't go back to him and will wait til one of the women have an opening. It only cost me $30.00 for an hour massage so I won't be out much.
 
luv and hugs
Marlee
Forum Moderator Fibromyalgia
 
Fibro,Sjogrens, Anxiety, Gastroparesis, IBS, Gastritis, Allergies, High Blood Pressure, Low Blood Sodium and Osteoarthritis
 
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Ginny
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   Posted 3/21/2009 8:57 AM (GMT -7)   
Marlee, I have a male massage therapist, male physical therapist, male chiropractor and a male pcp. I'd say they're all under the age of 40. They are great. Totally professional.  You'll do just fine!  I hope the MPS treatments really work for you. Please let us know how it goes and how you feel.  I'm also very curious about MPS stuff!
 
 
I can do anything through Jesus Christ who strengthens me. I have learned in whatever state I am in,to be content. Phillipians 4:11-13

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