Fibro and working

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Brit teacher
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2012
Total Posts : 56
   Posted 7/2/2012 3:43 PM (GMT -6)   
Anyone got any tips on coping with fibromyalgia and working? I'm fortunate to be working part time and have been coping fine with it untill recently. However, I'm finding that recent stressful times in work have caused my fibromyalgia to get a lot worse and I'm finding it hard to keep up with the work load now. I suppose I just want to hear anyone elses experiences and any tips you might have. Thanks.

Andrea11
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2011
Total Posts : 104
   Posted 7/3/2012 5:34 AM (GMT -6)   
Thanks for starting this thread. I'm particularly interested to find out if any of you stopped working for others and transitioned to working more independently or starting your own business so that you could pace yourself.

Sherrine
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Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 15374
   Posted 7/3/2012 7:43 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi, Brit, and welcome!  With your name, I'm assuming that you are a teacher.  Do you teach young children or older ones?  I was a teacher and the work load is enormous.  You work all day and then have to bring a ton home to work on in the evening...grading papers, lesson plans, etc.  So that does make it rough.
 
Stress will cause more pain so do some deep breathing exercises, pray or meditate when you are alone, things like that.  Keep moving.  Don't sit at a desk for long periods of time.  Don't lift heavy things either.  There is always someone  you can get to help you with heavy things.  There are some gentle stretching exercises that you can do sitting down while at your desk.  You will find these on Fibro 101.  They really do help, too.
 
I use some vitamins and supplements that have helped me with pain and fatigue and they might help you, too.  I use malic acid/magnesium supplements and vitamin D3 supplements along with an alternative pain product called Curamin.  I also use ibuprofen with food, extra strength Tylenol, and a muscle relaxer called Robaxin.  These all help me be in control of the pain.  
 
Be sure to read Fibro 101...the second thread on the forum.  There are links to good info about fibro and you will learn a lot there.  Good starting links are called Symptoms, What Else Could It Be, and A Thorough Explanation of Fibromyalgia.  You just might see yourself there.  There are links about the vitamins and supplements that I mentioned above, also.   
 
I'm looking forward to getting to know you better.  Don't hesitate to ask questions because we are here to help you.  Hope to hear more from you soon.
 
Sherrine  
Forum Moderator/Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia, Crohn's Disease, Ostomy, Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease, Diabetes, Osteoporosis, Glaucoma, Scoliosis, Ankylosing Spondylitis
************************
God does not give us a spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind. 2 Timothy 1:7

getting by
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Sep 2007
Total Posts : 34980
   Posted 7/3/2012 8:41 AM (GMT -6)   
I really think that starting one's own business can be very stressful. It was for me, but I was able to work for somebody else while I had fibro and it was good. Taking on the responsibility of one's own business is very hard, though depending on what type of business, that could make the difference. I was into flowers when I girst got fibro and the fibro caused me to lose the business. Among other things that went wrong.

Just my experience. It may not be the same for others though.

Best wishes,

Hugs, Karen
Moderator-Depression and fibromyalgia


fibromyalgia, Chronic fatigue, depression, allergies

Brit teacher
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2012
Total Posts : 56
   Posted 7/3/2012 11:28 AM (GMT -6)   
I teach young children. I love it but am beginning to doubt if I can continue to do it. I know it's possible to work and live with this but have recently noticed some symptoms that are making it harder. With a class full of little ones it can get a bit noisy at times, I'm finding the noise difficult to tollerate. Wondering if anyone else has found an increased sensitivity to noise an issue? I'm moving down to work with even younger children next term so this is bound to be more of an issue then and it's worrying me. I don't want to have to give up a career I've worked hard to build. Think I mainly just need to voice my worries at the moment and hearing about other people's experiences is helpful. Thanks for your advise Sherrine, will try these things, I'm new to this so still learning about my limits. Not on any medication as yet, my doctor has been really good and seems to know more about this than many I've seen in the past but I've basically been told that there is no cure or anything and its really just a matter of getting on with it. So I'm struggling a little with that at the moment.

Sherrine
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 15374
   Posted 7/3/2012 12:05 PM (GMT -6)   
You can find things that will help you control the pain.  The noise issue you might be able to control.  The old standby....one person at a time can speak....might help.  I taught fourth grade, 9-10 year olds and this would work for them.  If everyone were talking all at once, it would drive me batty!  LOL  Even first and second graders can learn that when someone is speaking they have to wait their turn.  Of course, when working on projects together you might remind them to use their "soft" voices...like they don't want to wake a baby!  Simple incentives could be used to reward the tiny voices, too.  I think they would get the picture.
 
If you find what helps with the pain and make a few changes, you might not need to leave your job.  I loved teaching when I was doing it too.  There are ways of working around this illness to do what you want.  I hate to see anyone give up something they love.  We are very adaptable creatures...and so are children!
 
Please don't project yourself into the future.  That will cause unneeded stress.  No one knows the future and you could be worrying about something that won't happen!  Take one day at a time.  You certainly can handle that. 
 
There is no cure...yet.  But there are things we can do to make life good and have a full and enjoyable life, too.  If you have a particualr problem, post here and others may have some great ideas you haven't thought about!  Keep a positive outlook.  I look forward to each new day with anticipation.  If it turns out to be a bad day, I can handle that but then I plan on having a good day tomorrow.  There is a good link in Fibro 101 about steps to maintaining a positive attitude.  I have found my positive attitude helps me as much as any medication in dealing with this health problem. 
 
Let us know how things are going for you.  We really do care about you.
 
Sherrine
Forum Moderator/Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia, Crohn's Disease, Ostomy, Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease, Diabetes, Osteoporosis, Glaucoma, Scoliosis, Ankylosing Spondylitis
************************
God does not give us a spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind. 2 Timothy 1:7

getting by
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Sep 2007
Total Posts : 34980
   Posted 7/3/2012 4:23 PM (GMT -6)   
I am also sensitive to loud noises. I could imagine that teaching young children is hard. Patience is a virtue I guess.

Have a wonderful day all...

Hugs, Karen
Moderator-Depression and fibromyalgia


fibromyalgia, Chronic fatigue, depression, allergies

Acheybody
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 5596
   Posted 7/3/2012 5:08 PM (GMT -6)   
I'm a substitute teacher in the elementary grades. I could never do it full-time (never have) but in small doses, I really enjoy it. The kids energize me and give me hope, even though the way we have to teach them is depressing.

One of my biggest problems when I'm there is sensitivity to sounds. I'm constantly saying, "Keep it down!" when they're working in groups, and they'll look at me like I'm nuts. I've realized that a lot of the time, it's just me....(of course, sometimes, it's not.) But I don't seem to have any way to gauge it anymore. I've been doing this for 11 years, and it's definitely gotten worse. If one of the kids tells me that it's hurting his ears and he has a headache, then I know!

I'm also more and more genuinely hard-of-hearing (why do those 2 things so often go together??)

Debbie
Moderator, Fibromyalgia Forum

Fibromyalgia, herniated disc L4-5, (recent discectomy), extensive spinal deterioration, Hashimoto's, IBS, migraines, tachycardia, hearing loss, (probably Menieres) chemical sensitivities

Brit teacher
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2012
Total Posts : 56
   Posted 7/4/2012 3:09 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks for sharing. Glad it's not just me going mad! Had an indoor sports day today which was hell, too many children in one place making too much noise I couldn't think straight for the discomfort of it. Other kids were finding it noisy so they definatly needed to quieten down but other staff couldn't get why I was struggling with the sound and wouldn't help.  mad They kept looking at me strange for wanting to get the kids to keep the noise down. Frustrating. Do u find being around a lot of noise is always a problem or just on 'bad fibro days'?

steppingstone
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2010
Total Posts : 366
   Posted 7/5/2012 9:30 AM (GMT -6)   
My hearing is super-sensitive. I know that it must have been hard for my children as they were growing up, as I was constantly yelling at them to quiet down. As a child care provider, I am finding myself having to constantly tell the children to use "indoor voices". I have found it helpful, at times, to use "white sound" to muffle some of the other noise the children cause. I sometimes use classical music. I also seem to notice a difference in the children's behavior when this is playing in the background (they are maybe not quite so wild?). It also seems to help when the younger kids are napping, and those too old for naps are playing. The classical music doesn't seem to interfere with their sleep, and, in fact, seems to help them stay asleep longer.

I understand all too well about the noise from indoor sports. I am not a sports fan, primarily for this reason. The noise from the crowd, even on TV can be way too much for me. Many years ago, before I ever realzed that I had a problem with this, I attended a college basketball game. The noise from the basketball being dribbled up and down the court, along with the roar of the crowd and that obnoxious buzzer were unbearable. I left with a splitting headache that I had not had when I arrived.

Acheybody
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 5596
   Posted 7/5/2012 10:50 AM (GMT -6)   
For me, it's every day. I can remember the night it started, over 30 years ago....I was pregnant for the first time. We went to a New Year's Eve party, where the music was impossible for me to take, so I went in the bedroom and buried my heads in all the coats on the bed! No one understood that one.

Another time, we went to a Chuck Mangione concert. My hubby agreed it was too loud, but I was actually in pain. We had to leave early.

PE is the one class I've never subbed in - I know there's no way I could handle all the yelling little high-pitched voices, echoing off the walls! Added to that, I have depth-and-motion-perception problems, so a bunch of balls   shocked   bouncing every which-way would turn my stomach for sure.

Ah, fibro. It does keep us wondering!

Debbie
Moderator, Fibromyalgia Forum

Fibromyalgia, herniated disc L4-5, (recent discectomy), extensive spinal deterioration, Hashimoto's, IBS, migraines, tachycardia, hearing loss, (probably Menieres) chemical sensitivities

Brit teacher
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2012
Total Posts : 56
   Posted 7/5/2012 4:46 PM (GMT -6)   
Ok thanks, will give the 'indoor voice' a go and I really like the idea of playing background music too. I've done this in a class of older children during art lessons as it helps with creativity so I can really imagine it being good to focus and quieten the class generally also.
 
It's generally not too bad in class with 25 6 year olds but harder when the school comes together for things and the children are excitable and noisy. I'll be in a unit of 62 4 and 5 year olds (in a fairly small room considering the number of children) next year so that's my main fear as they're only little and I wouldn't want to be telling them to be quiet all the time.
 
I totally recognise the sensation of being in pain from noise. It's so hard to describe to others for them to understand isn't it. Maybe i need to go shopping for some ear protectors.... that'd give the children a bit of a laugh too I suppose! tongue Lol!
 
Just trying to keep positive at the moment but it's tough when there seem to be new symptoms all the time and no one else (other than people on here) seems to understand it. I'm only 28 and have previously been quite active so I'm now trying to learn how to adapt and learn how to get on with it.
Thanks all.

getting by
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Sep 2007
Total Posts : 34980
   Posted 7/5/2012 6:16 PM (GMT -6)   
Know that it will all work out. I really admire what you do. I know it is hard. But it sounds like you have a fantastic attitude and that will get you far. Keep posting, and keep on keeping on... You are a wonderful person. Get earmuffs. lol...

Hugs, Karen
Moderator-Depression and fibromyalgia


fibromyalgia, Chronic fatigue, depression, allergies

applevenus
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2011
Total Posts : 934
   Posted 7/5/2012 10:55 PM (GMT -6)   
We were at an elementary school event several years ago & they used a loudspeaker for the music during some games. I found the noise downright painful and I couldn't understand why everyone else there wasn't reacting the way I was. I had to walk out. This is yet another Fibro symptom I am recognizing now.
46F, Fibromyalgia, Vitamin D deficiency, Sleep Apnea/CPAP therapy, allergies/multiple chemical sensitivities, possible Chronic Fatigue & occasional IBS symptoms.

I take vitamins, Tramadol for pain, Flexeril as needed.

Brit teacher
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2012
Total Posts : 56
   Posted 7/6/2012 8:58 AM (GMT -6)   
Thanks for the hugs and positive pep talk Karen. Just have to keep on going and what will be, will be. The one great thing about teaching is the power of the infectious nature of children's excitement and joy. There are times when that alone can keep you going through anything. They're so funny!
 
I think I'll start a new fashion trend... earmuffs...indoors... in July! I think it'll catch on.   tongue

Myself 09
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2009
Total Posts : 4431
   Posted 7/6/2012 11:03 AM (GMT -6)   
I carry earplugswith me always. I don't even think about it.

Planes. Supermarkets. Malls. At work when I don't want to be bothered.

I can tell when I am pre-flare, because I cannot pick out important sounds from background sounds. I have a hard time in class sometimes (I teach adults), for when Everyone is excited I cannot hear.
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