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Mom2sophia
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 262
   Posted 1/15/2008 11:31 AM (GMT -7)   
I just talked to a dietician and she said that I am constipated because I am not getting enough fiber for my age (I am 26).  She said I should be consuming 35 grams a day!!  She also said to take a probiotic (which I am) AND eat yogurt (ughh, yogurt is constipating).  Anyway...does anyone around my age actually consume that much fiber a day?

Keriamon
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 2976
   Posted 1/15/2008 1:16 PM (GMT -7)   
I'm 28 and I know I don't get that. Also, I found that a chewable supplement that I tried made my C worse when I had C and made my D worse when I had D. I am in the minority here when it comes to that odd reaction to fiber supplements, but there are a few others who get it too. Granted, that may not happen if I try a different brand of supplement, but as my guts are okay right now, I'm not interested in finding out.

Yogurt is not normally constipating UNLESS you have a diary intolerance. At which point it's not good for you to have. If you know for sure that yogurt constipates you, then you should not eat it, and should avoid all other dairy products (cheese being something that IS normally constipating, even for normal people).

This sounds defeatist, but there are plenty of people with C on here who get all of the recommended daily allowace of fiber and then some and still have C. There are people who don't get that much fiber who don't have C. While fiber supplements can really turn some people's lives around, they can't for some other people. I'm suspicious of the statement that because you have C, you don't have enough fiber; it's not always that simple or fixable. It may be for you, so you should try, but don't think it's your fault somehow if it doesn't work.

And I keep saying "fiber supplement" because it's generally hard for IBSers to get everything they need from food alone. Most IBSers have some problem with a lot of fruits and some vegetables. In people with D, it tends to make the D worse, in people with GERD, it tends to cause more indigestion, and in everyone it tends to cause more gas.

Bananas, by the way, are one fiber source you should avoid as they are naturally constipating.

Do a fiber count to see how much fiber you are getting a day, and then try to slowly increase that amount to see if you get any better. I say slowly because if you try and add a lot of fiber all at once you are sure to get gas and cramps.

Mom2sophia
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 262
   Posted 1/15/2008 3:31 PM (GMT -7)   
You really made me feel better, thank you.  It's just, no one seems to understand that I do consume on average 27 grams of fiber a day, I drink water, and only water, 70 oz a day...keep in mind I weight 94 lbs...so this is a lot of food for me...but I still do it and NO bowel movement....I guess that is why I have surgery scheduled for a total colectomy ;)
 

Keriamon
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 2976
   Posted 1/15/2008 4:49 PM (GMT -7)   
Yeah, no one thinks about how much food you have to eat to get that much fiber, and that a small person is not going to have room to eat that much food. Fiberous foods typically don't have a lot of calories, but they have a lot of bulk. No matter what others say, don't eat more than you can hold/ don't make yourself sick with overeating. That's no help. Besides, smaller people have smaller intestines and should therefore need smaller amounts of fiber to get the same job done, right? Unfortunately, it sounds like you fall into the group of people who doesn't get much help from fiber.

Although, did anyone tell you that with C, you need more SOLUABLE fiber and less INSOLUABLE? Soluable fiber turns into a gel and it helps grease the works, as it were. Insoluable fiber is just bulk. Needless to say, you need more grease and less bulk (the opposite is true for people with D, which is why fiber can sometimes help them). The pulps of many fruits are mostly soluable fiber, as is most of the fiber in bread and crackers. Insoluable fiber is mostly located in the skins of fruits and veggies. Broccoli and cauliflower and apple skins and bell peppers are all very high in insoluable fiber. Now, everything that has fiber has both kinds--even fiber supplements--however, many things have more of one than another. If you peel an apple, you will have more soluable than insoluable fiber. It's the opposite with a bell pepper, though. You can get fiber supplements that have a lot more soluable than insoluable fiber in them.

Mom2sophia
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 262
   Posted 1/15/2008 5:51 PM (GMT -7)   
No I didn't know that.  I do not that insoluable fiber is hard on my stomach though, so I usually do peel my apples, etc.  But lately, I have been trying to get more insoluable just b/c that is what everyone recommends.  I will try more insoluable...
 
Anything else that you can think of that has more insoluable?  I guess I could always look it up.  Unfortunately, I can't handle bread...I have a slow emptying stomach and bread is hard for me to digest...plus I read it is constipating, go figure.

Meryl70
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 14
   Posted 1/15/2008 8:25 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi, I have IBS-C and I don't go on a regular basis even with taking a probiotic and using benefiber. Which one is better for constipation? soluable or insoluable?

Thanks.

Mom2sophia
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 262
   Posted 1/15/2008 8:59 PM (GMT -7)   
I would assume it is soluable.  How many times a week do you go to the bathroom?  Do you know how much fiber you eat during the day?

xyz
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 34
   Posted 1/15/2008 9:39 PM (GMT -7)   
I have IBS-C and seem to get better results with insoluble fiber (high fiber bran cereal) than with soluble fiber (metamucil, citrucel).  Maybe it's the miralax I also take that helps move the fiber along.

gutastrophe
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 319
   Posted 1/15/2008 11:01 PM (GMT -7)   
xyz said...
I have IBS-C and seem to get better results with insoluble fiber (high fiber bran cereal) than with soluble fiber (metamucil, citrucel).  Maybe it's the miralax I also take that helps move the fiber along.
Metamucil and Citrucel are both INSOLUBLE fibers.  The rule of thumb:  if it dissolves in water without clumping or thickening, it is a soluble fiber.  Those that get thick and gritty are insoluble.
I don't know how in the "minority" we C'ers are.  The more I read on these boards the more I realize that we have the same response to fiber supplements.
I took Metamucil, on the advice of doc's, for 10 years, every single day.  Finally ended up in the ER with an impacted colon and FINALLY, a GI with a heart of gold sat down and explained how fiber supplemens actually worsen C.  Imagine your colon is full of old, hardened, dry stool and you keep throwing down a substance that is going to "bulk" up the colon contents and extract even more liquid from an already dehydrated bowel.  You'd be better off pouring cement down your throat!
That's not to say we shouldn't have fiber.  For me, the only fiber I put in my mouth is that which can be obtained as nature intended - through food.  In addition, it's imperative that I get enough fats and WATER!!!  All these factors make the difference between a happy belly or a blue belly!
 

Mom2sophia
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 262
   Posted 1/16/2008 5:24 AM (GMT -7)   
Gutastrophe:  What is a normal day of eating for you?  I too was taking fiber supplements when I was first diagnosed with IBS (Citrucel and Met.) but my C got worse. 

pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 1/16/2008 9:07 AM (GMT -7)   
Both fibres are actually necessary but here's the differences of each...

Soluble fibre becomes sticky when it combines with water and forms a gel-like substance found in fruits, veggies, seeds, brown rice, barley, oats and oatbran.

Insoluble fibre acts as a sponge as it passes through the digestive tract and abosrbs moisture many times it's weight in water, by doing so it increases the bulk of stools and softens it. These characteristics facillitate the transit of foods through the intestines, thereby preventing constipation...insoluble fibre is found mainly in wholegrains, legumes (beans, peas, lentils) and the skins of many fruits and veggies.

Fibre also aids with sweeping the bowels clean of bacteria and taking a probiotic daily is also essential...if you don't enjoy yogurt then there are powder and cap forms of probiotics to choose from...one I use is called primadophilus reuteri which along with fibre supplements as well as eating fibreous foods has helped me with my crohns and IBS.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it!  LOL  :)


gutastrophe
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 319
   Posted 1/16/2008 10:17 AM (GMT -7)   
Mom2sophia said...
Gutastrophe:  What is a normal day of eating for you?  I too was taking fiber supplements when I was first diagnosed with IBS (Citrucel and Met.) but my C got worse. 
Oh boy.  Well, I don't think anyone should follow my plan BUT I don't eat anything until late afternoon BECAUSE if I did, I would be down for the count.  My first meal (and often my only meal, depending on how I react) is usually around four or five o'clock in the afternoon, after I've finished work and have no committments for the evening.
I always have a protien.  Along with that I include one or two of the following:
sweet potato, butternut squash, yam, brown rice, barley, lentils, turnips, rhutabaga, fennel, and so on.
On occasion, I will have a baked white potato or white rice, BUT I do find that they either don't help with elimination or, in the case of the latter, actually impede the process.  So I try to avoid them.
I use a lot of olive oil when I cook.
I drink 50-60 ounces of water a day.
However, even with the best possible diet, I still experience pain and discomfort (and some level of C) every day. 
I've concluded, over the last 30 years with this nonsense, that it's not the food itself but the eating and digesting of food.  I have done every diet imaginable for this disorder (including 2 full years of macrobiotics) and have never experienced a complete remission of symptoms.
My digestive system is just a bust from the mouth to the butt!
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