how can I slowdown Peristalsis

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

iffo
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 4/5/2009 8:56 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi,
 
I have always softstools. I been told it is because of faster Peristalsis. I tried using fiber. I was told that might help, but it did not ...  what about i try taking i teaspoon of immodium that may slow it down
 

yuckygut
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 214
   Posted 4/5/2009 9:24 PM (GMT -7)   
I believe many people do take immodium for their ibs, which I had tried many years ago for my colitis, but it never worked for me. I found a natural drink called Haldi, which contains a concentrated form of curcumin which works like an anti inflammatory. My friend is a nurse at the hospital and she takes it for her ibs-d, good luck.

iffo
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 4/6/2009 7:46 PM (GMT -7)   
i was hoping some natual herb to slow down Peristalsis. Immoium use on regular basis may not be good .. immodium  think is not contol serious diarha.

Keriamon
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 2976
   Posted 4/6/2009 8:37 PM (GMT -7)   
Immodium use on a regular basis is not good. No one should really take it daily past 2-3 months, or it can cause permanent slowing down of the colon so that you end up with terrible constipation instead. It's best to cycle on and off of it, as you can.

There's actually nothing wrong with soft stools, unless they are annoyingly frequent or you can't control them. Not everyone has really formed stools; some people naturally have soft stools. I wouldn't worry about fixing it unless it's interfering with your life.

You could try Caltrate 600 w/ vitamin D. It is a calcium supplement with a low amount of magnesium in it and it is naturally constipating. One of those a day (or two, if needed), might give you firmer, less frequent stools. Also, what type of fiber did you try? Not all fibers are the same; there's insoluable and soluable. Soluable fiber draws water into it and is used to help people who are constipated. Insoluable fiber is tough, stringy fiber and bulks up loose stools. All fiber supplements contain both, just as all fruits and veggies contain both, however you would want a fiber supplement that is much more insoluable than soluable. If you want to change your diet, look for fruits and veggies with tough peels or rinds. Bell peppers have a lot of insoluable fiber. The peels of apples are a lot of insoluable fiber, but the flesh bits inside are mostly soluable.

Also, bananas are naturally constipating. The dehydrated variety are especially so. But avoid apple juice, which is a natural laxative, as are prunes and prune juice. Also avoid sugar alcohols, which are found in sugar-free products; they're very bad to give people soft stools, diarrhea, and stinky gas.

Marsky
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 1956
   Posted 4/7/2009 5:44 AM (GMT -7)   
A low residue diet might help you also. I'm on one, have been for almost 10 years now.

My diet consists of bananas, white rice, mashed or baked potatoes, chicken, turkey, fish, saltines (I prefer Club Crackers), plain english muffins (I prefer Bay's, found in the chilled grocery section near cream cheese), white bread (I prefer your local bakery's fresh white bread or Sara Lee's original white bread), cottage cheese, applesauce (avoid the apple juice, as mentioned above), plain pasta (buttered egg noodles are a good choice), iceberg lettuce salads (avoid the baby greens salads), plain or vanilla flavored yogurt (avoid fruit on the bottom varieties), pretzels, Pepperidge Farm Bordeaux cookies (this variety is very calming to a touchy gut, there is ginger in this flavor of cookie), etc.

I avoid spicy foods (chili, tex-mex, etc.), any whole wheat product (bread, muffins, bagels, pasta), chocolate (I can have a small amount), fresh fruit such as pineapple, kiwi, mango, strawberries, red raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, etc. Some canned fruit is okay (pears, peaches). Raw veggies might be hard on your gut right now (carrot stix, etc.). Frozen veggies are okay, unless corn messes you up.

In all this time I've struggled, I've learned one important lesson - you are what you eat. If I want to control how much output I have, I must control the input (skipping or cutting down on meals if traveling or I have an important social function coming up, I just make up for lost food later in the day or the following day). If I want formed stool, I stay on the LRD. It's just simply the way I have to eat now.
Marsky/Mary's story.....
- Diagnosed with rectal cancer, April 1999 - Stage I, no treatment necessary
(5 hour colon resection: 90% sigmoid removed, 15 inches of colon removed, gall bladder removed, given temporary colostomy)
- Colostomy reversal, June 1999
- Left with IBS/D symptoms, multiple bm's every day
- On a low residue diet at least 75% of the time
- Takes Colace 50 mg each evening

All in all I do okay, I just use the bathroom A LOT! But I survived and beat cancer!


iffo
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 4/7/2009 7:25 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks a lot for your replies

Yes softstools intefer my life in a big way. When ever rarely if I have firmed stool i noticed that day my appetite is good, I eat much more than what I normally do. Since I got these softstool I lost 25 pounds. Makes me under weight.

More vege and fruits I eat more softstools I get.
I will try the suggestions you gave.

Mrae
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 25
   Posted 4/8/2009 4:16 PM (GMT -7)   
Marsky I see you had your gallbladder removed and then you were left with IBS-D. Have you tried Cholystermine? It is for that very thing when you galbladder is not working right or has been removed. It is suppose to help eliminate the D.

Mrae
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 25
   Posted 4/8/2009 4:24 PM (GMT -7)   
One more thing I forgot to ask I thought if you have IBS-D you want soluable fiber not insoluable fiber. Insoluable fiber will make D worse. At least that is what I have been told. And you can get the calcium carbonate tablets without the magnesiuim which would be better for people with IBS-D

Marsky
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 1956
   Posted 4/8/2009 8:21 PM (GMT -7)   
mrae - I have had my GB removed but I don't fall into the GB removal group, that has yellow bile that these meds often help. My doctor has said my trouble is from no longer having a place to store the stool inside, they removed my sigmoid since that's where my cancer was located. I can honestly say I've never had yellow bile or yellow looking stool, or even mucous in the stool. It's just the same amount I always had before, but instead of once or twice a day, I go 10, 12 or even 15 times a day. Like rabbit poop. LOL I find that if I do eat plain foods the stool is formed, if I stray from my diet, it can be all out D or messy (like putty but not the yellow bile I have read described here). But I do thank you. Next time I'm in for a visit I might ask again if chlystermine might help me. But I was given the impression that internally I am reconstructed and I now have a short transit time. All I know is my symptoms fall directly in with people who struggle with IBS/D the most. It's been frustrating because until I compared my situation to IBS/D folks, I didn't fit in anywhere. At the very least it's been helpful to read what works for patients who struggle with IBS, even C. One tiny suggestion from one member can actually help so many others. So I've found these message boards to be a God-send.

Thanks again for your suggestion though.
Marsky/Mary's story.....
- Diagnosed with rectal cancer, April 1999 - Stage I, no treatment necessary
(5 hour colon resection: 90% sigmoid removed, 15 inches of colon removed, gall bladder removed, given temporary colostomy)
- Colostomy reversal, June 1999
- Left with IBS/D symptoms, multiple bm's every day
- On a low residue diet at least 75% of the time
- Takes Colace 50 mg each evening

All in all I do okay, I just use the bathroom A LOT! But I survived and beat cancer!


WeEn
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 33
   Posted 4/11/2009 10:36 PM (GMT -7)   
hey i had a question for keriamon, now i thought it was the other way around, insoluble fibers clear you out why soluble fibers draw in water, with diarrhea you want soluble fiber so it draws in the water, instead of expelling it all out, or something, i just know my gastro told me to eat soluble fiber cuz i have loose stools

iffo
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 4/14/2009 5:53 PM (GMT -7)   
is Metamucil Psyllium soluable fiber?  I am looking to buy soluable fiber ...Also Marsky what is LRD?

Marsky
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 1956
   Posted 4/14/2009 6:47 PM (GMT -7)   
LRD - low residue diet.

You can google this diet and you'll find lots of links for it.
Marsky/Mary's story.....
- Diagnosed with rectal cancer, April 1999 - Stage I, no treatment necessary
(5 hour colon resection: 90% sigmoid removed, 15 inches of colon removed, gall bladder removed, given temporary colostomy)
- Colostomy reversal, June 1999
- Left with IBS/D symptoms, multiple bm's every day
- On a low residue diet at least 75% of the time
- Takes Colace 50 mg each evening

All in all I do okay, I just use the bathroom A LOT! But I survived and beat cancer!


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 4/14/2009 10:43 PM (GMT -7)   
For those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), controlling your diet is a very important part of reducing the symptoms of the condition. In many cases, dietary fiber has been shown to lessen the symptoms of IBS. A high fiber diet will ensure that the waste that passes through your colon is “bulky”, which may prevent diarrhea and relieve muscle spasms.

There are two types of dietary fiber: soluble and insoluble. In previous years, it was thought that either type of dietary fiber would provide a benefit to suffers, but a greater benefit to those with diarrhea-predominant symptoms. An increasing body of scientific literature now indicates that the benefits of soluble fiber are universal to sufferers whose symptoms are either diarrhea-predominant or constipation-predominant, and that insoluble fiber can actually trigger or exacerbate symptoms in some patients.

Soluble substances are those can be dissolved in water, whereas insoluble substances cannot. Soluble substances also tend to absorb water, which is where the principal benefit for IBS sufferers is derived. In comparison to insoluble fiber, the sugar molecules of soluble fiber are held together by chemical bonds that cannot be digested by the enzymes in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. As such, soluble fiber passes straight through your body intact meaning that more soluble fiber arrives in the colon and is available to absorb water. Water absorption from the colon by the fecal matter encourages the formation of stools that are gel-like, which helps to prevent diarrhea.

But additional water absorption doesn’t mean that constipation-predominant sufferers will be adversely affected. In fact, the absorptive properties of soluble fiber mean that the passage of softer, gel-like waste will actually soften and encourage excretion of impacted fecal matter.

Further, the gel-like consistency of waste containing soluble fiber means that the GI muscles are stretched around your full colon, which helps the muscles to grip during the waves of peristaltic contractions that act to force the waste through your gut. Violent and irregular muscle spasms are minimized, which means that abdominal cramping is also relieved.

Both insoluble and soluble fiber are contained in all plants foods, with the ratio varying dependent on the plant type. Insoluble fiber is typically found in whole wheat, wheat and corn bran, flax seed lignans and vegetables including carrots, celery, green beans and potato skin. Soluble fiber is found in rice and rice cereals, pasta, oatmeal, cornmeal, barley, quinoa and soy. You can also find soluble fiber in vegetables such as carrots, yams, sweet potatoes, turnips, pumpkins and mushrooms. Papayas are also a particularly good source of soluble fiber, with the added bonus that they are a digestive aid that relieves flatulence and indigestion.

Adopting a diet high in soluble fiber can help you manage the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


Marsky
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 1956
   Posted 4/17/2009 4:25 AM (GMT -7)   
Hey all - I'm still a firm believer in you are what you eat approach. As my sig states I follow a low residue diet.

Organic yogurt was helping me for a long time and then it seemed to make things worse for me. As a young child I had been allergic to dairy but I outgrew this allergy. Recently I got into a 2 week phase of first putty like stool that I could not turn around, then formed but multiple bm's, at least 15 a day. Now I'm in a more normal stage (well, normal for me). What happened? My gut was extremely noisy and active, even though I was on the LRD, 100% of the time. So I gave Stonyfield vanilla flavored yogurt a try again. 1 cup a day, split between half in the morning, half after dinner. Also one acidopholis (sp?) pill a day.

Both have really helped quiet my gut. I still go a lot, but down to my more normal - 10 to 12 bm's a day - instead of constant bm's, to the point where they woke me up at night.

If any of you are struggling, just try organic yogurt. It may help you.
Marsky/Mary's story.....
- Diagnosed with rectal cancer, April 1999 - Stage I, no treatment necessary
(5 hour colon resection: 90% sigmoid removed, 15 inches of colon removed, gall bladder removed, given temporary colostomy)
- Colostomy reversal, June 1999
- Left with IBS/D symptoms, multiple bm's every day
- On a low residue diet at least 75% of the time
- Takes Colace 50 mg each evening

All in all I do okay, I just use the bathroom A LOT! But I survived and beat cancer!

Post Edited (Marsky) : 4/17/2009 6:48:35 AM (GMT-6)


iffo
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 4/20/2009 6:23 AM (GMT -7)   
I don't digest vege well. Infact in my stools I often see peas or corn or onion. Not sure if this is normal?
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Saturday, December 03, 2016 7:07 PM (GMT -7)
There are a total of 2,732,357 posts in 301,012 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 151172 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, Whydoesithurtsomuch.
313 Guest(s), 12 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
ewafromwarsaw, Psilociraptor, 81GyGuy, Shaz032, Susannah R., summer16, Girlie, LG13, Uniform Charlie, Fairwind, Ggrlsav, pitmom


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2016 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer