Digestive Advantage

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mermaidmamma
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Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 11/11/2009 12:56 PM (GMT -7)   
Hey all! I'm a newbie here and just have a quick question. Has anyone here ever taken Digestive Advantage for their IBS? It was referred to me for my daughter, and I was just wondering how long it would take for it to begin to work. ANY advice for her would be MUCH appriciated!! Thanks! smilewinkgrin

shawn12
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Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 11/12/2009 10:35 AM (GMT -7)   
How old is your daughter and what are her symptoms.

It may or maynot help IBS. But there is some evidence it helps some IBSers. It might not be the only answer, but worth a try.
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.


shawn12
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Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 11/12/2009 10:36 AM (GMT -7)   
FYI

http://www.aboutibs.org/site/learning-center/video-corner/gutflora
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.


mermaidmamma
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 11/12/2009 11:55 AM (GMT -7)   
Shawn12, thank you for replying and any advice.
   My daughter is 11yrs old...her symptoms are, and have been for the past month..no sleeping due to pain.."stabbing and ripping" feeling above her belly button,no matter what position she's in, light headedness, regurgitation (that has now turned into vomiting). She says that when she feels like she has to pass gas, she has to force it out. We've been in and out of the ER 3 times, back and forth from the Dr's at least 5 different times, we've been to a stomach "specialist", who pushed on her stomach, and said nothing was wrong with her and that it was all in her head...AND she's done a Barrium Swallow, that showed nothing wrong. She was just in the ER on Tues night, and that's when she was diagnosed with IBS. I don't remember my mom throwing up or regurgitating from IBS. She has missed almost a month of school & she WAS a strait A student. Her quality of life sucks for her right now. shakehead

Jeannie143
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Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 6056
   Posted 11/12/2009 1:52 PM (GMT -7)   
If you ever get another doctor who says, "It's all in her head" leave immediately and don't pay the bill. If he threatens you tell him you are going to report him to the medical association. My daughter was told for several years that nothing could be found with her almost constant stomach pains and diarrhea. AFTER she showed up with a fistula her gastroenterologist finally found Crohns!!! DUH! She probably had if from age 5 and the fistula didn't rupture until she was 18. Had to have surgery and that GI is now on my "Poopie Headed Doctor" list!
~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
I know God will not give me anything I can't handle. I just wish that He didn't trust me so much. ~Mother Teresa

"People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross


shawn12
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Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 11/13/2009 10:53 AM (GMT -7)   
Personally I would get a second opinion, because there are some confusing symptoms there. How loong has the vomiting been going on and is the vomiting always when there is pain, or at other times also?

Second this is VERY important. Don't take offence, did the doctor actually physically say "all in her head" ?

Excellent links and information for you.

IBS and Children

http://www.ibshope.com/viewforum.php?f=14&sid=f835bad77f0a15bbdba2521acb84980a

aboutKidsGI.org

http://www.aboutkidsgi.org/


Talking about GI Disorders- kids

http://www.aboutkidsgi.org/site/about-gi-health-in-kids/talking-about-gi-disorders
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.


mermaidmamma
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 11/14/2009 2:56 PM (GMT -7)   
Yeah, unfortunately, she did say those exact words...except she said it directly to my daughter. I wouldn't take offense to that. They are REALLY confusing symptoms, and we have an appt for a 2nd opinion. We'll see what happens.

mermaidmamma
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 11/14/2009 2:58 PM (GMT -7)   
The pain seems to be the worst for her a few minutes before she vomits.

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 11/15/2009 1:10 PM (GMT -7)   
mermaidmamma, get a new doctor then, that is wrong for her to say that to your daughter.

It is however important to know emotions, stress and fear and anxiety and antisipatory anxiety are all part of IBS. It is a brain gut axis disorder and both the gut and the brain are operational to cause the symptoms.

However, vomiting is a red flag, unless its from severe pain perhaps, but that needs to be looked into by a better doctor.

IF its IBS actually some of the psychological treatments are very effective for kids and adults even though its not "all in her head" the brain does play a big role on gut functioning as do emotions and and the feeling I posted above.


Just fyi on kids and pain

Miranda van Tilburg, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine UNC Chapel Hill FGIMD
This study found that children with functional abdominal pain who used audio recordings of guided imagery at home in addition to standard medical treatment were almost three times as likely to improve their pain problem, compared to children who received standard treatment alone.

Monday, Oct. 12, 2009

CHAPEL HILL – Children with functional abdominal pain who used audio recordings of guided imagery at home in addition to standard medical treatment were almost three times as likely to improve their pain problem, compared to children who received standard treatment alone.

And those benefits were maintained six months after treatment ended, a new study by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University Medical Center researchers has found.

The study is published in the November 2009 issue of the journal Pediatrics . The lead author is Miranda van Tilburg, Ph.D. , assistant professor in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology in the UNC School of Medicine and a member of the UNC Center for Functional GI & Motility Disorders .

“What is especially exciting about our study is that children can clearly reduce their abdominal pain a lot on their own with guidance from audio recordings, and they get much better results that way than from medical care alone,” said van Tilburg. “Such self-administered treatment is, of course, very inexpensive and can be used in addition to other treatments, which potentially opens the door for easily enhancing treatment outcomes for a lot of children suffering from frequent stomach aches.”

The study focused on functional abdominal pain, defined as persistent pain with no identifiable underlying disease that interferes with activities. It is very common, affecting up to 20 percent of children. Prior studies have found that behavioral therapy and guided imagery (a treatment method similar to self-hypnosis) are effective, when combined with regular medical care, to reduce pain and improve quality of life. But for many children behavioral therapy is not available because it is costly, takes a lot of time and requires a highly trained therapist.

For this study, 34 children ages 6 to 15 years old who had been diagnosed with functional abdominal pain by a physician were recruited to participate by pediatric gastroenterologists at UNC Hospitals and Duke University Medical Center. All received standard medical care and 19 were randomized to receive eight weeks of guided imagery treatment. A total of 29 children finished the study; 15 in the guided imagery plus medical treatment group and 14 in the medical treatment alone group.

The guided imagery sessions, developed jointly by van Tilburg, co-investigator Olafur Palsson, Psy.D. and Marsha Turner , the study coordinator, were recorded on CDs and given to children in the study to use at home.

The treatment consisted of a series of four biweekly, 20-minute sessions and shorter 10-minute daily sessions. In session one, for example, the CD directs children to imagine floating on a cloud and relaxing progressively. The session then gives them therapeutic suggestions and imagery for reducing discomfort, such as letting a special shiny object melt into their hand and then placing their hand on their belly, spreading warmth and light from the hand inside the tummy to make a protective barrier inside that prevents anything from irritating the belly.

In the group that used guided imagery, the children reported that the CDs were easy and enjoyable to use. In that group, 73.3 percent reported that their abdominal pain was reduced by half or more by the end of the treatment course. Only 26.7 percent in the standard medical care only group achieved the same level of improvement. This increased to 58.3 percent when guided imagery treatment was offered later to the standard medical care only group. In both groups combined, these benefits persisted for six months in 62.5 percent of the children.

The study concluded that guided imagery treatment plus medical care was superior to standard medical care alone for the treatment of functional abdominal pain, and that treatment effects were sustained over a long period.

UNC co-authors of the study included Denesh K. Chitkara, M.D., adjunct research professor; William E. Whitehead, Ph.D., professor and co-director of the UNC Center for Functional GI & Motility Disorders, and Nanette Blois-Martin, pediatric nurse-practitioner.

Martin Ulshen, M.D., division chief of pediatric gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition at Duke University Medical Center, is also a co-author.

DOI 10.1542/peds.2009-0028, Van Tilburg, MAL, Chitkara DK, Palsson OS, Turner M, Martin, N, Ulshen, M, Whitehead WE (2009) Audio recorded guided imagery reduces chronic abdominal pain in children. Pediatrics, 124(5),e890-e9897. http:// www.pediatrics.org

http://www.med.unc.edu/medicine/fgidc/tilburg_in_the_news.htm

This isn't the first study to show very positive effects. and this is pretty good in reducing the pain byy half or more.

"In the group that used guided imagery, the children reported that the CDs were easy and enjoyable to use. In that group, 73.3 percent reported that their abdominal pain was reduced by half or more by the end of the treatment course. Only 26.7 percent in the standard medical care only group achieved the same level of improvement. This increased to 58.3 percent when guided imagery treatment was offered later to the standard medical care only group. In both groups combined, these benefits persisted for six months in 62.5 percent of the children. "


I say this is important, I have had IBS since I was ten and am now 49. Back in the day they called IBS spactic colon and "implied" it was "all in the head."

Recent research has shown both the gut and the brain are operational to cause the symptoms. This confuses some people when ever someone talks about the brain and IBS, they thin k its all back to all in the head, but that is a misconception now about the condition and the bidirectional communication between the brain and the gut "brain". Stress and emotions don't cause IBS, but they can make it way worse. And certain psychological techniques can make it way better.

for example

Gut Feelings: The Mind-Body Connection

http://www.ahealthyme.com/topic/mindbodygut;$sessionid$TJVAS2IAAETVTWCYSYZSFEQ


This is worth reading also as there are specialist psychologist who work with IBSers and know about IBS and that its "Not all in the head", but the importance of the brain and our thoughts on our bodies. The gut can upset the brain and the brain can upset the gut.

ask the experts

"Many people experience distress and anxiety when their doctor makes a recommendation that they see a psychologist. This reaction often comes from the belief that a referral to a psychologist carries with it assumptions about symptoms being “all in your head” or the result of “mental illness”. These are two of the biggest misconceptions about the practice of psychology in a medical setting, and they can often stand in the way of patients achieving a meaningful
reduction in symptoms. In this column, I hope to dispel some of these misconceptions around psychology in a medical setting, and in doing so communicate a few of the benefits you might be able to achieve in working with a psychologist to address your symptoms of IBS."

First things first, your physical problems are real! If your doctor gives you a recommendation to meet with a psychologist it does not mean that the symptoms are “all in your head” or the result of “mental illness.” Your experience of IBS is likely to be debilitating to you, and it can have wide ranging effects on your loved ones, yourself and activities that you want to engage in. Psychologists and physicians work together, with the understanding that the mind and body
are connected. If you are feeling ill and having many symptoms of IBS, you may also experience an increased level of stress and discomfort. This stress and discomfort contribute to a cycle of worsening symptoms that can spiral into more severe IBS. Psychologists and physicians work together with you to interrupt that cycle and help you learn to decrease the number and severity of your symptoms."

http://www.med.unc.edu/medicine/fgidc/psychandIBS.pdf

By the way on this could be extremely helpful for you and your daughter.

http://www.uncmedresearch.com/PALSchat/UNCchat.php

If someone would have known about these things and started them on me way earlier in my life, it would have made a huge difference to my outcome.


I would see a new gastroenterologist and try to figure out what going on with her. Some of her symptoms, are at odds with an IBS diagnoses. Does the pain wake her at night? Or just trouble going to sleep because of pain.
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.


mermaidmamma
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 11/15/2009 3:21 PM (GMT -7)   
Shawn12, we are going to another gastrointerologist this coming week to get a "second opinion" but I don't think we ever got a first one...I'm throwing a fit about an ultrasound...they can't rule out everyting, until they've done ALL the tests they can do. I'm beginning to think it's gallstones. All her symptoms seem to fit. We'll see. I just want my baby back. I feel so bad for her. sad

mermaidmamma
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 11/15/2009 3:26 PM (GMT -7)   
Shawn12, sometimes both, but mostly she wakes up at night because of the pain and can't get back to sleep, and if I were to give her Tylenol, she would just throw it up because her stomach is empty, but i try anyways just to keep her pain at a minimum.

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 11/16/2009 8:23 PM (GMT -7)   
Let me know how it goes for her and what the doctors say.
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.


mermaidmamma
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 11/17/2009 7:19 AM (GMT -7)   
Well, we went for an ultrasound and MRI yesterday and NOTHING was found. Now, I'm wondering if after the initial injury (she got kicked in the stomach about a month ago when her and her brother were wrestling around, then when she was practicing her rollerskates, she fell pretty hard on her bottom) maybe somehow her pain receptors or nerve endings got messed up and is STILL sending the pain signal to her brain. It makes sense to me, but OBVIOUSLY I'm not a doctor. While I got you, is there any thing that you might know of, that I can give her to sleep? Besides Meletonin....it makes her sleepy, but doesn't keep her asleep. I'm out of suggestions for her...besides the relaxation yoga we do before bed. shakehead

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 11/18/2009 11:30 AM (GMT -7)   
 
I don't want to personally recommend otc's for kids for sleep aids. However, Chamomile tea or sleepytime tea might help.
 
There are some sleep aids for children online so you know.
 
You might want to email me also with IBS in the subject line
 
 

 
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.


jeanneac
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 1812
   Posted 11/22/2009 8:47 AM (GMT -7)   
Don't you wish we could have a list of these docs online so they would quit doing this to people? I don't know why some of these people go into medicine. Oh yea, I forgot, many make megabucks!
diagnosed 1/09 with "diverticular colitis" ?? location: sigmoid colon
localized scleroderma & IBS, low thyroid,claritin, advair, singulair, lisinopril, progesterone, colazal, fish oil, synthroid, zoloft, wellbutrin, VSL#3 probiotic, Vit. D
Blood test positive for Crohn's via prometheus ibd serology panel
 

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