Social Security Disability

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

bluntman
New Member


Date Joined Jul 2010
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 7/18/2010 2:02 AM (GMT -7)   
Well, what a way to start off my 1st post huh...
 
Very happy to find you guys!!  Shared suffering is always better
 
Im a disabled vet with a myriad of problems, and IBS has put me over the edge and Im trying to get somemore help! Just when you think things cant get any worse...
 
Anyway Im hoping someone can help with SSDI...I'm in the process of filing and I'm not sure how to get proof that I actually have IBS!  As you all know its not one of those things that shows up on a test.  Do I just get a note from the doctor saying "based on what the patient tells me, he has IBS"??
 
Anyone gone thru this?  I did some searching but couldnt find anything related...thanks a million for any advise!

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 7/18/2010 9:39 AM (GMT -7)   
welcome bluntman, you do need documentation from your doctor.
 
This might also help.
 
Is IBS a Disability?

"Depending on the circumstances it is up to each employer, insurer, or governing authority to determine individual disability.

The U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) defines disability as the inability to engage in any substantial gainful activity by reason of any medically determinable physical or mental impairment(s) which can be expected to result in death or which has lasted or can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than 12 months. (SSA Pub. No. 64-039, May 2002) However, the SSA does not recognize irritable bowel syndrome on its Listing of Impairments -- Adults, Section 5, Digestive System.

To our knowledge, the only regulation that specifically recognizes IBS as a disability is the Veterans Affairs, Veterans Education and Benefits Expansion Act of 2001, Public Law 107-103 signed by President Bush on December 27, 2001. Section 202 -- Payment of Compensation for Persian Gulf War Veterans with Certain Chronic Disabilities -- includes this provision: (2) For purposes of this subsection, the term "qualifying chronic disability" means a chronic disability resulting from any of the following (or any combination of any of the following): (B) A medically unexplained chronic multi-symptom illness (such as chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and irritable bowel syndrome) that is defined by a cluster of signs or symptoms. The law authorizes funding to expand and increase educational, housing, burial and disability benefits for chronic multi-symptom illnesses to the list of service-connected conditions for Gulf War veterans. "

http://aboutibs.org/site/about-ibs/faq

 

 

 


Forum Moderator
 
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.


bluntman
New Member


Date Joined Jul 2010
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 7/18/2010 10:17 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks much for the effort Shaun...I'm out on the VA cause I retired 6yrs ago and the IBS has developed over the last year.  Altho I believe its come from a sting of illnesses, mental and physical, that the VA has rated as service connected, I dont have the energy anymore to spend the next 10yrs proving it to them.  Besides I have to get in line behind the troops coming back from war now...
 
Its pretty amazing they wont consider it!  I basically find my self glued to the house anymore worried about what is safe to eat!  Whats more debilitating?
 
I guess my question would be...I'll list it and its misery on the claim, but if SSA doesn't recongnize it, why bother to get proof and sweat over it?
 
Also, did you get this from SSA.gov?  I havent been able to get that site to open for days now, just error messages...

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 7/18/2010 10:26 AM (GMT -7)   
I got the info from the IFFGD.

It can take a long time to see if they accept a person.

Hopefully in the near future they will recognize it as a disablity in the General population.

This is also new

New! IOM Report Links Gulf War Deployment to Functional GI Disorders

http://www.med.unc.edu/medicine/fgidc/gulfwar.htm

http://www.usnews.com/science/articles/2010/04/12/gulf-war-syndrome-real-institute-of-medicine-concludes.html

Basically the issue is with the judge you get and how much documentation you have, but it can still take many years. Some people get it though.


I want to go over that "worried" with you some more.
Forum Moderator
 
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.


stepjrn
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 40
   Posted 7/18/2010 12:56 PM (GMT -7)   
Bluntman, as part of a former occupation for many years, long before I got IBS myself, I used to assist people with applications and problems with SSDI/SSI and other benefits. In my experience, it doesn't matter much what the applicant says, even in a lot of detail, even if Social Security does recognize a specific condition as a disability. It matters very much what the recent medical records (especially 3-6 months before application) and the health care providers say. For some disabilities that exist and limit employment but don't cause "medical" issues that require people to see doctors more than the average person, or for conditions like IBS that can cause a lot of symptoms and limitations without showing up on tests, that can be challenging to prove.

Since I got IBS myself, I haven't heard or read of many people with IBS getting SSDI or SSI on IBS alone. But some people get it primarily based on the anxiety or depression or agoraphobia that often accompanies severe IBS. Or they may have other conditions that qualify. If you apply, I would definitely report everything, including the IBS, but emphasize some other diagnosis they will more easily accept. It's important for your health care providers to support you in this. A lot of them aren't very experienced in reporting things in a way that is going to work for Social Security (for any condition, not just IBS) or the applicant signs releases thinking the medical records will be sent and they're not, or Social Security loses them, etc, and the person gets rejected. I would ask your providers for personal copies of anything that is sent on your behalf so you know exactly what it says and you have your own backups in case they are lost. Also, if you find that your doctor writes things in a way that makes your IBS sound trivial, you can ask him/her to correct it.

Fortunately, at this time, I'm still able to work, although it's hard sometimes. But in case I can't in the future, I make sure that I give my health care providers my own detailed, typed notes (2-3 pages the first time, less for updates) of my medical history (not much of interest before IBS), the circumstances of onset, every single possibly related symptom, every treatment I've tried and what happened or didn't happen (including the self help stuff, since in my case, conventional medicine wasn't much help at all). I even write a section summarizing the various resources I've used to educate myself on IBS, the major people in the IBS community with whom I've made contact, the IBS studies I've volunteered for and mostly been rejected from and my advocacy and awareness efforts, sometimes copies of relevant articles from IFFGD/UNC etc, so at the very least, it's clear to them that I'm not ignorant on the subject. I don't know how much of it they read, if anything, but they do put it in my file, and if it's in the file, it's in the medical record for what it's worth, and it's not just the provider's own brief notes that leave out 90% of the information. I hope that will follow me wherever I need it to.

I hope this helps.

SnowyLynne
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 1539
   Posted 7/18/2010 1:50 PM (GMT -7)   
try eating more white rice,oatmeal,bland foods.No fatty greasy foods no corn,thi=ses are the foods that set my IBS off big time.......I eliminated many foods & started over so am able to eat better now......It just takes time.
SnowyLynne


shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 7/19/2010 5:24 PM (GMT -7)   
stepjrn

Thanks for posting that its a good thing to know. Hope your doing okay.
Forum Moderator
 
I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.


Dee Parks
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2010
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 8/15/2010 9:24 PM (GMT -7)   
I had no luck with SSDI.  I had a really good job working for the state and can't work anymore due to my IBS. Good Luck!

panther fern
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 163
   Posted 2/26/2011 3:37 AM (GMT -7)   
I am a Persian gulf vet. My symptoms started as IBS, rashes, fatigue and I seriously thought i was a hypochondriac because my health went down noticeably I had three children with my husband, I had wicked headaches, pain in all my joints, nothing showed in my blood work. My family dr. new me since i was born when we got out of the Navy he new my personality new depression and mild anxiety were just not me. I got strange virus' sick easy, yet i was determined to finish college as a hygienist worked extremely part time. My issues kept like 1 step forward two back. ( I am new to this forum so I hope i clicked in the correct area) My IBS continued to get worse. So he put me on a drug called Methotrexate which isn't at all used for that. He did it more as a study. He said if it helped, I was looking at something more Auto immune and if it didn't well then we would keep an eye on my liver (by blood work) and i would go off of it. well i was on a low dose and noticed i was getting relief in many areas. but i was scared because it was helping and i was in my young 20's with a husband and three kids and i knew it was killer on the liver. so i said ahh i can deal.

As far as IBS goes, there are so many things that can flare the GI system. Do you also have GERD. Reflux? Have you had an endoscopy and colonoscopy?
The ibs can be caused from food allergies to stress to being a secondary instead of a primary problem. I am not a dr. I have just had years of being sick and I did go to school for dental hygiene which seems strange but you learn many diseases and pharmacology ... because it is amazing but many affect your hygiene and like Type II diabetics are often diagnosed by hygienist because you go to get your teeth cleaned more often than just a reg dr check up.

If you have filed disability and it has failed. and you have more than the IBS or it is preventing you from work. get a lawyer. In doing this get a boss that has let you go for the reason of being non dependable to write a letter on your behalf. If you are a good employee but have trouble staying out of the bathroom I know it sucks i have been there with pts in my room They (your former employer can be a great character witness) I truly believe 90 % + would prefer to work if they could everyone likes to contribute in some form. I am on disability and i am torn over it. I know i can not work, hell i can barely take care of me on most given days, but I am educated and I really miss being in a work environment esp having my kids are all well 19, 18 and 16 and my husband has to work his tail off to take care of us. The guilt of being sick sucks. I would recommend a nutritionist as well. I hope that all of you with this problem can find some serious relief. I have good and crapty...days with it and the cramping is unbearable. there is a diet called the BRAT diet bananas rices applesauce and toast (plain) on bad days these are the simple easy things to digest. I would suggest making sure you don't have anything more going on.... allergy, ulcerative colitis, crohns, or other things that can keep you from gettting nutrition you need. when you get blood work make sure you at least get one metabolic panel ran... this is like your B-12 and other things they always don't check for.... things that can make you feel really run down and well hope some of this information helps... (new to forum panther fern (gulf war,SLE lupus and many other things cuz i am special that way lol) God Bless you and may you find a hint of joy in every day even the bad ones.

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 2/26/2011 12:08 PM (GMT -7)   
There is a new brain study showing structural issues in IBS in the brain in females. One of the problems of IBS and disability is they don't have something exact to point to, like a biomarker. That could change in the not to distant future.

There is a small group of us working on some of these issues in IBS for awareness, disability, research ect.. I will post soon about it all.
IBS Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

TheChickenPrincess
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 554
   Posted 5/10/2011 10:07 PM (GMT -7)   
stepjrn said...
I make sure that I give my health care providers my own detailed, typed notes (2-3 pages the first time, less for updates) of my medical history (not much of interest before IBS), the circumstances of onset, every single possibly related symptom, every treatment I've tried and what happened or didn't happen (including the self help stuff, since in my case, conventional medicine wasn't much help at all). I even write a section summarizing the various resources I've used to educate myself on IBS, the major people in the IBS community with whom I've made contact, the IBS studies I've volunteered for and mostly been rejected from and my advocacy and awareness efforts, sometimes copies of relevant articles from IFFGD/UNC etc, so at the very least, it's clear to them that I'm not ignorant on the subject. I don't know how much of it they read, if anything, but they do put it in my file, and if it's in the file, it's in the medical record for what it's worth, and it's not just the provider's own brief notes that leave out 90% of the information. I hope that will follow me wherever I need it to.



This information above needs an amendment - at least. I know the original poster meant well, however, my experience is very different. I have given many written journals, notes, records, photos, discs of info, and other types of proof to my medical doctors over the years - since 2004 at least. All the while, I thought they were being permanently saved in my file. These were given to both specialists and GP's. Each said, to my face looking me in the eye, that they'd keep it in my files. Now, all these years later, when I received copies of all of my medical records I find that not one single piece of information that I gave them was put into my file. And trust me, I requested copies of EVERYTHING in my files - from a to z. They just don't keep what is given to them. They only include copies of data they collect or create themselves in their labs and offices. So while the poster meant well - you need to check and double check this method on your own, with your own doctor. Give them something, and then request your records and see if it is in there. In my case, it simply was a waste of my time. In fact, I even offered to give former x-ray results to my rheumatologist, x-rays from a hospital with final findings from the radiologist - and while my rheumy felt the data was significant to my health, he explained to me the records themselves wouldn't be of much use to them in my files (as in it won't end up in my new records with their facility) - but he was glad to KNOW I had this identified condition!

HOWEVER, on a brighter note - the original poster need not be as worried that IBS isn't on the fast track list of illnesses that get awarded SSDI most quickly. This site explains a bit more about that:
"How To Get SSDI Approved"
www.ssdrc.com/blog/2008/10/how-to-get-ssdi-approved.html

I am currently waiting for the decision on my first attempt for SSDI. If that fails, I'll hire an attorney to do the appeal. Fingers crossed. I did print out a year's worth of my own medical journal, a booklet of my medical highlights over my lifetime which led me to becoming disabled and unable to work, and a list of all my illnesses (came to be 17 conditions) - and sent all of that along with my application to the SS office. Oh - and I collected all my medical records myself - and sent them to the SS office. First, you need to know what your doctor's are writing - and second you need to make sure the files really do get to the SS office and get there in a timely manner. Many a case is lost because records don't show up in time, or don't support the applicant's claims.

Good luck!!

Post Edited (TheChickenPrincess) : 5/10/2011 11:16:19 PM (GMT-6)


stepjrn
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 40
   Posted 5/12/2011 5:19 PM (GMT -7)   
ChickenPrincess, thank you for your comments. You took issue with part of mine. I'm sorry that your MDs did not keep your documentation. That happens, and if you notice in my post, I also advised the OP to keep personal copies of anything and be aware of what was being submitted on his/her behalf. The advice to give records to one's MDs was not my only advice and the two are not mutually exclusive.

As I said in my post, I used to do this sort of thing for a living (as well as going through the system myself for something other than IBS many years ago). In my experience, except in the highest levels of appeal, it is *not* generally necessary to have a lawyer if one is as well organized and proactive as we both describe. A well informed claimant, or a well informed relative or friend helping can do quite a bit, and there are community based non-profit organizations throughout the U.S. similar to my former employer where people with disabilities can get assistance, in most cases, *for free*. Many of those who are employed in these organizations, are by the organizations' mission and mandate, people with disabilities themselves, so they know by life experience as well as theory what this is all about. Find your nearest such organization here.

http://www.ilru.org/html/publications/directory/index.html

Attorneys will take their fees from a cut of whatever benefits are eventually awarded. Generally, by the time benefits are received, people have not been working for at least several months, often longer, and need every cent. Of course, attorneys do deserve to get paid for their professional services, and many of them do a good job, but also be aware that there are disreputable companies out there composed of disreputable attorneys or non-attorneys posing as attorneys who prey on vulnerable people in this situation. Before you hire a disability attorney, first, be very sure you need one in the first place. Don't pay out of your relatively modest future benefits for things you or a peer advocate such as I described above, can do. And if you do need an attorney, check him or her and the firm out thoroughly before signing on.

Hope this helps.

beeber9
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2011
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 11/16/2011 8:35 PM (GMT -7)   
need some insight, im only 21, and after the last two years of dealing with CD i have finally stopped having flares but as you know it doesn't mean we dont have pain or always drained. im finding it hard to pay off my medical bills and try to go to school, i recently became a CNA and got my foot in the door with the hospital so i could afford school and it has done nothing but kick me in the butt, i onl work three days but im exhausted and have cramps non stop, i can't take narcotics, and i am trying to eat healthy i can't seem to keep a steady paycheck or a decent job, should i go ahead and apply for SSI? i feel like im giving up on myself and my future, but i can't pay any bills or pay for my medicine if i dont work... help please!!!

Evrblue
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2011
Total Posts : 20
   Posted 11/18/2011 6:51 AM (GMT -7)   
Just my 2 cents...I applied and won SS Disability in 2002. My primary dx was Depression Disorder, but since I have many other conditions that affect my ability to work, IBS being one of them, for each condition I got records from each specialist, or a written letter from the doc describing the condition and the limitations, and how long the condition would last. Also what meds/procedures had been tried for each condition and why they failed.
I have a specialist for each body system now, and it makes for a lot of dr visits and bills, but
I believe it was the combination of several conditions that won my case.
Dx: Major Depressive Disorder, Anxiety, IBS,PTSD, Migraine, Diabetes, Chronic Pain from Arthrits & Back Injury

"etiam in morte superest amor"- in death, love survives
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Saturday, December 03, 2016 7:01 PM (GMT -7)
There are a total of 2,732,351 posts in 301,012 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 151172 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, Whydoesithurtsomuch.
295 Guest(s), 15 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
Psilociraptor, hateuc, AnxiousTexan, orchid_rain, Girlie, rocckyd, LG13, time2reclaim, UCAvery, Hawaii3654, Fairwind, Ggrlsav, DutchessCountyJim, (Seashell), otheym432


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2016 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer