acupuncture and moxibustion

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Panda_82
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2010
Total Posts : 34
   Posted 8/5/2010 5:52 AM (GMT -7)   
Today I saw a chinese acupuncturist and had acupuncture and moxibustation for my IBS.
I have attached an article about moxa treatment.  I had not heard of this until the other day.  I'm going to give it a go and see if it improves my symptoms.  Anything is worth a try!!
 
 
 

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 8/5/2010 10:52 AM (GMT -7)   
To be honest, in studies using accupunture for IBS it has not been that effective, but some for pain.

What has shown to be very effective for most IBSers, up to 85 percent and I am a huge fan myself is gut directed clinical hypnotherapy.

You should read this, he is an expert in IBS and does a lot of ibs research. Its not stage hypnosis and there are a lot of unfounded misconceptions about HT, but using it for IBS has been highly effective, its just not well known.

Why Consider Hypnosis Treatment for IBS?
by Olafur S. Palsson, Psy.D.


Hypnosis is only one of several approaches to treating irritable bowel syndrome and may not be the most suitable option for all patients (click here for discussion of treatment options for IBS). However, hypnosis treatment has some advantages which makes it an attractive option for many IBS sufferers with chronic and severe symptoms:

- It is one of the most successful treatment approaches for chronic IBS. The response rate to treatment is 80% and better in most published studies to date.

- The treatment often helps individuals who have failed to get improvements with other methods (see for example: Whorwell et al., 1984, 1987; Palsson et al., 1997, 2000).

- It is a uniquely comfortable form of treatment; relaxing, easy and generally enjoyable.

- It utilizes the healing power of the person's own mind, and is generally completely without negative side effects.

- The treatment sometimes results in improvement in other symptoms or problems such as migraine or tension headaches, along with the improvement in IBS symptoms.

- The beneficial effects of the treatment last long after the end of the course of treatment. According to research, individuals who improve from hypnosis treatment for IBS can generally look forward to years of reduced bowel symptoms.

http://www.ibshypnosis.com/whyhypnosis.html

another thing about HT and IBS, is the treatment can and usally does keep working long after you stop the treatment. Unlike say drugs where the symptoms come back if you don't take them. Its also very safe and very natural and the side effects are stress reduction, like anxiety and can also help sleep and other non gi symptoms.


The accupunture is worth a try and may help. But to be honest there have been quite a few studies on it if you search pubmed and IBS and accupunture. I hope it works for you.

Another thing to just know is that in IBS there is a 20-80 percent placebo rate to all treatments when IBSers start them.
Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

stepjrn
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 40
   Posted 8/6/2010 8:00 AM (GMT -7)   
Actually Shawn, acupuncture/TCM is one of the very few things that have helped me with a lot of symptoms that conventional MDs did not know what to do with. (Hypnotherapy is another one, as you know. Thanks for your help with that!) My acupuncture/TCM practitioners are very qualified both in the US and Asia, and were, until recently, affiliated with the integrative medicine units of 2 internationally known teaching hospitals in the major US city near me.

One concern that I have about many of the existing studies on acupuncture and IBS that I've heard of is that they're very brief, a few weeks long, whereas I was told up front by the practice treating me not to expect results, if any, for at least 6-8 weeks. I was there weekly for almost a year and still go regularly now, though less often. Improvement was gradual but unmistakable. If I had given up in 3 weeks, as was the length of one study I read, I would have considered it a failure as well.

Like anything with IBS, I'm not claiming it's a quick fix cure, neither is the practice treating me, and it may not work for everyone. I'm not sure why it worked for me, but I'm not sure why conventional western medicine doesn't work either. We take what we can get where we can get it. I'm pretty sure it is not just a placebo effect though, because if I were susceptible to placebo effect, more than 2-3 things out of 50+ would have helped noticeably. Also, the very worst intervention for me was the med given to me immediately after diagnosis, which I had to stop just 9 days later. As you know, my onset was very sudden and I sought help very promptly. At that point, nobody had told me yet that IBS is chronic and incurable, I thought it was an acute problem and I fully expected to recover if I took the meds as prescribed. Obviously, this is not what happened, so no placebo effect there.

Good luck to the original poster.

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 8/6/2010 1:02 PM (GMT -7)   
I gope it didn't come across as someone shouldn't try it, just that the studies are inconclusive or mainly help pain some.

There are quite a few studies on IBS and acupunture.

This is interesting just for the info also.

Experts: Placebo Power Behind Many Natural Cures

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,573846,00.html

Of course not everything is a placebo effect and even the placebo effect is complicated and of course acupunture has benefits.

I am glad it helped you stepjrn
Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 8/6/2010 1:11 PM (GMT -7)   
This is new about what was posted.

Symptom management for irritable bowel syndrome: a pilot randomized controlled trial of acupuncture/moxibustion.
Anastasi JK, McMahon DJ, Kim GH.

Columbia University School of Nursing, New York, NY 10032, USA. jka8@columbia.edu

Abstract
The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the effect of an individualized traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) acupuncture and moxibustion (Acu/Moxa) treatment on symptom control in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in a preliminary, randomized, sham/placebo-controlled trial. Twenty-nine men and women with IBS were randomized to either individualized Acu/Moxa (treatment group) or sham/placebo Acu/Moxa (control group). All subjects were assessed by a diagnostic acupuncturist for a TCM evaluation and individualized point prescription. Only those subjects assigned to the experimental group received the individually prescribed treatment. The diagnostic acupuncturist did not administer treatments and was blind to treatment assignments. All subjects kept a symptom diary for the duration of the study, enabling measurement of symptom frequency, severity, and improvement. The Clinical Global Impression Scale was administered preintervention to establish baseline severity and on completion of the 4-week, eight-session treatment intervention. After 4 weeks of twice-weekly Acu/Moxa treatment, average daily abdominal pain/discomfort improved whereas the control group showed minimal reduction. This between-group difference adjusted for baseline difference was statistically significant. The intestinal gas, bloating, and stool consistency composite score showed a similar pattern of improvement. The findings indicate that Acu/Moxa treatment shows promise in the area of symptom management for IBS.

This was a small study sample wise.


This is a newer study and thr results in 2011


Acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome: a protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial.
MacPherson H, Bland M, Bloor K, Cox H, Geddes D, Kang'ombe A, Reynolds J, Stamuli E, Stuardi T, Tilbrook H, Torgerson D, Whorwell P.

Department of Health Sciences, University of York, UK. hm18@york.ac.uk

Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) for conclusions to be drawn. Given the current interest in acupuncture by patients, it is in the public interest to establish more rigorous evidence. Building on the positive findings from a pilot study, in this paper we present the protocol for a fully-powered trial designed to establish whether or not acupuncture is effective and cost-effective. METHODS/DESIGN: In this pragmatic randomised controlled trial we will randomise patients recruited directly from GP databases to either 10 sessions of acupuncture plus usual GP care or to usual GP care alone. The primary clinical outcome will be the IBS Symptom Severity Score (SSS) (maximum score 500) at three months, and at 12 month assessing whether there is an overall benefit. We estimate the sample size required to detect a minimum clinical difference at 90% power and 5% significance to be 188 patients. To allow for loss to follow up we will recruit 220 patients drawn from an estimated primary care population of 140 000. Analysis will be by intention-to-treat, and multiple imputation is to be used for missing data.In a nested qualitative study using in-depth interviews, we will explore how patients, acupuncturists, and GPs explain and subsequently understand acupuncture to work. We will use purposive sampling to identify patients and flexible topic guides for the interviews. The data analysis will lead to a thematic description of how patients and practitioners explain how acupuncture works, and whether or not the explanations influence treatment outcome and/or referrals.We will undertake a cost-effectiveness analysis at 12 months by comparing resource use in the two groups with any treatment benefit. We will use the EQ-5D to measure health-related quality of life and convert into quality adjusted life years (QALYs). We will generate cost effectiveness acceptability curves (CEACs) exploring the probability that acupuncture will produce an acceptable cost per QALY at different cost-effectiveness thresholds. DISCUSSION: The trial has received NHS ethics approval and recruited 233 patients between November 2008 and June 2009. Results are expected in 2011. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN08827905.

This was the three week study but a bigger sample size. This were also more actual researchers on IBS.

Am J Gastroenterol. 2009 Jun;104(6):1489-97.

A treatment trial of acupuncture in IBS patients.
Lembo AJ, Conboy L, Kelley JM, Schnyer RS, McManus CA, Quilty MT, Kerr CE, Drossman D, Jacobson EE, Davis RB.

The Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Rabb/Rose 1, Boston, MA 02215, USA. alembo@bidmc.harvard.edu

Comment in:

Gastroenterology. 2010 Jul;139(1):348-50; discussion 350-1.
Am J Gastroenterol. 2010 Mar;105(3):699.

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to compare the effects of true and sham acupuncture in relieving symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: A total of 230 adult IBS patients (75 % females, average age: 38.4 years) were randomly assigned to 3 weeks of true or sham acupuncture (6 treatments) after a 3-week "run-in" with sham acupuncture in an "augmented" or "limited" patient-practitioner interaction. A third arm of the study included a waitlist control group. The primary outcome was the IBS Global Improvement Scale (IBS-GIS) (range: 1 - 7); secondary outcomes included the IBS Symptom Severity Scale (IBS-SSS), the IBS Adequate Relief (IBS-AR), and the IBS Quality of Life (IBS-QOL). RESULTS: Although there was no statistically significant difference between acupuncture and sham acupuncture on the IBS-GIS (41 vs. 32 % , P = 0.25), both groups improved significantly compared with the waitlist control group (37 vs. 4 % , P = 0.001). Similarly, small differences that were not statistically significant favored acupuncture over the other three outcomes: IBS-AR(59 vs. 57 % , P = 0.83), IBS-SSS (31 vs. 21 % , P = 0.18), and IBS-QOL (17 vs. 13 % , P = 0.56). Eliminating responders during the run-in period did not substantively change the results. Side effects were generally mild and only slightly greater in the acupuncture group. CONCLUSIONS: This study did not find evidence to support the superiority of acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture in the treatment of IBS.

PMID: 19455132 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]PMCID: PMC2694961Free PMC Article

Acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome: a protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial.
MacPherson H, Bland M, Bloor K, Cox H, Geddes D, Kang'ombe A, Reynolds J, Stamuli E, Stuardi T, Tilbrook H, Torgerson D, Whorwell P.

Department of Health Sciences, University of York, UK. hm18@york.ac.uk

Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) for conclusions to be drawn. Given the current interest in acupuncture by patients, it is in the public interest to establish more rigorous evidence. Building on the positive findings from a pilot study, in this paper we present the protocol for a fully-powered trial designed to establish whether or not acupuncture is effective and cost-effective. METHODS/DESIGN: In this pragmatic randomised controlled trial we will randomise patients recruited directly from GP databases to either 10 sessions of acupuncture plus usual GP care or to usual GP care alone. The primary clinical outcome will be the IBS Symptom Severity Score (SSS) (maximum score 500) at three months, and at 12 month assessing whether there is an overall benefit. We estimate the sample size required to detect a minimum clinical difference at 90% power and 5% significance to be 188 patients. To allow for loss to follow up we will recruit 220 patients drawn from an estimated primary care population of 140 000. Analysis will be by intention-to-treat, and multiple imputation is to be used for missing data.In a nested qualitative study using in-depth interviews, we will explore how patients, acupuncturists, and GPs explain and subsequently understand acupuncture to work. We will use purposive sampling to identify patients and flexible topic guides for the interviews. The data analysis will lead to a thematic description of how patients and practitioners explain how acupuncture works, and whether or not the explanations influence treatment outcome and/or referrals.We will undertake a cost-effectiveness analysis at 12 months by comparing resource use in the two groups with any treatment benefit. We will use the EQ-5D to measure health-related quality of life and convert into quality adjusted life years (QALYs). We will generate cost effectiveness acceptability curves (CEACs) exploring the probability that acupuncture will produce an acceptable cost per QALY at different cost-effectiveness thresholds. DISCUSSION: The trial has received NHS ethics approval and recruited 233 patients between November 2008 and June 2009. Results are expected in 2011. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN08827905.

I think this part is important all the way around.

"There is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) for conclusions to be drawn."

And as long as someone has the money to try it, why not. But also to get a point across some treatments have been shown to be effective on a lot of IBSers.
Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.
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