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Valorie
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2004
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 8/14/2010 6:30 AM (GMT -7)   
Hello All-
 
I have been struggling with a flareup of my Crohns and IBS for a few months now. I have  a new GI who switched me to Lialda and that has helped a great deal with the pain and major D. My main problem now is that I have spasms whenever I eat and am on a very limited diet. I really am just living on protein shakes and instant breakfast mix. I am tired and cranky alot of the time due to the pain and hunger. I have tried Bentyl, Levsin and Pamine for the cramping and none of them have worked. I have seen one nutritionist and one dietician. The nutritionist basically told me that yes I had alot of food issues- (also allergic to soy, lactose intolerant, and have GERD). She thought i was doing a good a job as possible and i just needed to keep trying to find foods that didnt make me sick- pay her copay and have a nice day. So fast forward another month and am eating less foods so i decide to try a dietician this time hoping she can give me food plans and ideas. So I saw her yesterday and she wants me to go for LEAP food allergy testing. Now the testing is not allowed in NY so I would have go to another state for it- it is a blood test and then working with a dietician afterwards. The closest state is Ohio which is 5 hrs away- then it would be working with the dietician over the phone which my insurance wouldnt cover- they only cover face to face consultations. She pretty much said to me there wasnt much she could do for me and that i needed to do this testing instead as she feels my issues are primarily food related. I mentioned that I dont necessarily agree with that- I think it a combo and that i think sometimes it doesnt matter what i am eating- just that i am eating anything at all. I also said that i am surprised that i would have the fast reaction i do to an allergy- within a few bites my guts start churning. she admitted that was not typical for a food reaction. She then sighed and said she would work with me but it would be the equivalent of finding a needle in a haystack to find foods that i can eat and that i can do that on my own. The irony is that is the exact phrase the nutritionist used. So I am frustrated, disheartened and confused. I really dont think i want to spend more money and time on her when she clearly doesnt feel she can help me. I also dont want to turn away a possible solution to my illness and maybe an explanation for all my symptoms. Maybe the LEAP program could give me that but i also dont want to spend money i dont have on snake oil cures.
 
So I guess to sum it up, I have two questions- has anyone had any experience with this LEAP program and any thoughts on diet? I am heartily sick of white bread, chicken, and protein shakes.. three months in it is getting old.
 
Thanks for listening.
Val

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 8/14/2010 9:41 AM (GMT -7)   
I will post some more on this, but skip the LEAP tetsting and try to find another dietian.
 
Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

kim123
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1201
   Posted 8/15/2010 6:21 PM (GMT -7)   
If you have crohn's, diet can definitely be a factor in your symptoms. There can be a fungal etiology to crohn's disease, as well as colitis. Patients have found relief from following antifungal diets, as well as diets that severely reduce carbs for a time such as the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, or The Maker's Diet. Have you looked into any of these? For one, any foods with yeast particularly (i.e.bread), would be a no-no. In one particular study I read, food items containing raw yeast (dough/pastries) led to more frequent problems for crohn's patients. Are you avoiding all artificial sugars, alcohol, limiting processed foods with hidden ingredients/preservatives/chemicals/yeast. Are you taking probiotics? Just throwing some ideas out there for you to consider.

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 8/15/2010 6:43 PM (GMT -7)   
Valorie

Sorry to hear you have both. The reason in IBS foods can effect a person almost right after eating is because IBSers have an altered gastro colonic response.

This is more about the amount of calories in a meal as well as the amount of fats, which trigger the responce. This is about "THE act of eating itself" and not particular foods themselves.

Postprandial symptoms are a common feature in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In one study, one half of patients presenting with IBS reported symptom occurrence or exacerbation following a meal. (1) This effect of meals on gastrointestinal symptoms has been attributed to an increased colonic contractile response to meals in IBS patients. This colonic response has several components.

The first and most rapid component occurs within a few minutes of distension of the stomach by the meal and is mediated by gastric mechanoreceptors that evoke colonic contraction through a vagally mediated afferent pathway.

A second phase, mediated by chemo-receptors in the small intestine, results in colonic contraction that may last up to two hours after meal ingestion. (2) Prolonged manometry (3) and barostat studies (4) demonstrated that the increase in colonic motility after meals was almost immediate, and subsequently we and others reported that patients with diarrhoea and urgency predominant IBS experienced these symptoms in association with repetitive high amplitude propagated contractions that induce mass movements in the colon. (5,6)

The third phase of the colonic contraction after the meal results from ileal stimulation by chyme and has been documented best in animals as it occurs 2-6 hours post-meal ingestion, (7) a time when humans are often ingesting another meal and stimulating the first two components!

The first two phases of the colonic response to food involve serotonergic pathways: thus, antagonism of the serotonin (5-hydroxytroyptamine (5-[HT.sub.3])) receptor reduces both components of the colonic response to meal ingestion. (8)

In this issue of Gut, Houghton and colleagues (9) provide further support for the role of serotonin in mediating this response [see page 663]. They report increased postprandial serotonin levels in patients with diarrhoea predominant IBS and meal related symptoms; serotonin levels were higher than those of patients with IBS without meal related symptoms. There were also higher fasting levels of serotonin in IBS patients compared with controls..."

http://www.accessmylibrary.com/comsite5/bi...d=0286-23195846


Part of this process is from an alter gastro colonic responce

""The gastrocolic reflex, a partly neurogenic process, refers to an increase in colonic motility induced by feeding. Postprandial deviations from the normal motility patterns lead to altered bowel habits. For example, a spastic colon (eg, diarrhea-predominant IBS [D-IBS]) is characterized by an exaggerated motility response to food intake. This exaggerated postprandial response also occurs in response to intraluminal distention or to an injection of cholecystokinin (CCK -- a hormone released in the duodenum) in patients with IBS."

I highly recommend this which has graphics as well.

http://www.helpforibs.com/footer/gastrocolic.asp


This food info might help

http://www.ibshealth.com/ibsfoods.htm

Yeast in not involved in the pathophysiology of IBS.

Since I have suffered for thirty eight of IBS I wonder what role foods play in IBS. So I asked Dr Douglas Drossman at the UNC Center for Functional GI and Motility disorders and here was his response. This is not a substitute for seeking medical advise from your doctor on any specific conditions you may have, but for educational purposes only.

Dr. Drossman is a Co-director of the Center and Professor of Medicine and Psychiatry at UNC-CH. He established a program of research in functional gastrointestinal disorders at UNC more than 15 years ago and has published more than 250 books, articles, and abstracts relating to epidemiology, psychosocial and quality of life assessment, design of treatment trials, and outcomes research in gastrointestinal disorders.


Dr Drossman's comments on foods for IBS Health.

Shawn,
To say that people with IBS may get symptoms from food intolerances is an acceptable possibility, since the gut will over react to stressors of all types including food (high fat or large volumes of food in particular). Furthermore, there can be specific intolerances. So if you have a lactose intolerance for example, it can exacerbate, or even mimic IBS. Other examples of food substances causing diarrhea would be high consumers of caffeine or alcohol which can stimulate intestinal secretion or with the latter, pull water into the bowel (osmotic diarrhea). The same would be true for overdoing certain poorly absorbed sugars that can cause an osmotic type of diarrhea Sorbitol, found in sugarless gum and sugar substituted foods can also produce such an osmotic diarrhea. Even more naturally, people who consume a large amount of fruits, juices or other processed foods enriched with fructose, can get diarrhea because it is not as easily absorbed by the bowel and goes to the colon where it pulls in water. So if you have IBS, all of these food items would make it worse.

However, it is important to separate factors that worsen IBS (e.g., foods as above, stress, hormonal changes, etc.) from the cause or pathophysiology of IBS. Just like stress doesn't cause IBS, (though it can make it worse), foods must be understood as aggravating rather than etiological in nature.

The cause of IBS is yet to be determined. However, modern research understands IBS as a disorder of increased reactivity of the bowel, visceral hypersensitivity and dysfunction of the brain-gut axis. There are subgroups being defined as well, including post-infectious IBS which can lead to IBS symptoms. Other work using brain imaging shows that the pain regulation center of the brain (cingulate cortex) can be impaired, as well as good evidence for there being abnormalities in motility which can at least in part explain the diarrhea and constipation. So finding a specific "cause" of IBS has grown out of general interest in place of understanding physiological subgroups that may become amenable to more specific treatments. Hope that helps.
Doug

http://www.ibshealth.com/ibsfoods2.htm

I would find a new dietian.

Leap I believe is basically a "scam." I spent years going over the leap program and information with one of the people that started it and IBS is NOT caused by foods, which is what they basically promote. I can go into more details if you want on it. Its also pretty expensive.
Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

kim123
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1201
   Posted 8/16/2010 1:47 PM (GMT -7)   
I would not spend the money to have any of those tests done...just me personally. I would experiment with an antifungal diet, or similar SCD and within 2-4 weeks see if you don't feel better...all for free. Then, you would know what may, or may not be the cause. Again, many crohn's patients have found fungus to be their "issue". Not speaking for the IBS part of it. It may be hard at this point for you to distinguish between the 2 since both can serve similar symptoms.
 
Diet does not "cause" Crohn's per se, but if fungus is the problem, the high carbs/sugar/yeast feed it so that symptoms continue to worsen. Just giving up random foods here and there won't help. You would probably have to stick to a particular regimen for a minimum of 2 weeks. It will take time for your body to get well. You didn't get sick overnight.For me personally, yeasty foods and too much sugar aggravate my gasto-intestinal area. My IBD issue is fungus, probably from antibiotic use as a teen, living in a moldy/mildewy and water-damaged house for a period of time, eating a lot of grains(wheat/corn) which contain mycotoxins, and/or from taking birth control pills.

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 8/16/2010 5:24 PM (GMT -7)   
something to note.
 
Fungus is in the gut to PROTECT you from pathogens. When there is a REAL overgrowth it can be detected and treated and is a serious issue that can in some cases lead to death.
 
Its not the cause of IBD conditions or IBS.
 
Carbs and sugars can negatively effect the gut for other reasons.
 
There are fungus meds if that is a real issue and there are real ways to diagnose it.
 
There is also a ton of bad information on the internet about it all and people are making a ton of money promoting BAD information.
 
It's Not All In Your Head: Understanding Irritable Bowel Syndrome
you have to select quicktime or windows media.
 
 
 

Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

kim123
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1201
   Posted 8/17/2010 4:41 PM (GMT -7)   

Just wondering...what is your background in the study of mycology? You seem pretty sure that fungus is not a viable cause of IBD, or many even other common diseases. I don't wish for this to be a debate back and forth, but I want to let Val, and others know that it is not just my opinion.

One of many mycology researchers, Dr. A.V. Constantini, former Head, U.N. World Health Organization, has written many books about fungus causing many diseases in man, some being CD and colitis (IBD). I think his book series is called Fungalbionics. I still stand firm that fungus is often an underlying issue of disease, especially those with Crohn's disease or colitis. Again, I'm not talking about IBS. It was an antifungal diet plan and natural antifungal supplements that got me well again (no symptoms. no meds) after 8 years of colitis misery. If you haven't had a history of CD or colitis, perhaps you are not the one to comment on what has helped others who have had those diseases, and I don't mean any disrespect when I say that.

Pubmed has many references to CD/colitis and fungus/yeast being linked...too many to post here. One recent ...

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20149741   and another on colitis

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17203803

With this I end my part of the discussion. If Val would like Crohn's advice, perhaps she can browse the Crohn's disease forum. Many there speak of antifungal programs and the SCD which has helped them. This IBS forum doesn't appear to be the right place to discuss CD or colitis, and I will honor that. Good luck, Val.

 

 


shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 8/18/2010 9:55 AM (GMT -7)   
Just wondering...what is your background in the study of mycology?
 
about 8 years of studying IBS, but also the differences between IBS and IBD conditions and there causes. Help from World recgonized Gi doctors, one who studies in -depth the mycology of the gastrointestinal tract.
 

Welcome to Doctor Fungus, your on-line reference to all things mycological!!VIEW IMAGE

The Official Website of the Mycoses Study Group

 

This the resource for the NIH.

 
Chronic Candidiasis
Overview

It has been proposed that the asymptomatic colonization with Candida might be associated with a variety of symptoms and cause a "Candida Hypersensitivity Syndrome" [="window.status='Dismukes. 1990. A randomized, double-blind trial of nystatin therapy for the candidiasis hypersensitivity syndrome. ...'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00599.htm', 'Webnote00599', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00599.htm" ?>599] This concept was popularized by William Crook, MD in his book The Yeast Connection [="window.status='Crook. 1983. The yeast connection: a medical breakthrough. Professional Books, Jackson, Tennesse....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00491.htm', 'Webnote00491', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00491.htm" ?>491]. Previously, C.O. Truss, a physician from Birmingham, Alabama had proposed the existence of such a malady [="window.status='Truss. 1983. The Missing Diagnosis. Birmingham, Ala., Birmingham, Ala....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02257.htm', 'Webnote02257', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02257.htm" ?>2257, ="window.status='Truss. 1978. Tissue injury induced by Candida albicans: mental and neurologic manifestations. J Orthomol Psychiat...'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02259.htm', 'Webnote02259', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02259.htm" ?>2259]. Other names that have been given to this presumed condition include: The syndrome is theoretically due to an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the gastrointestinal tract or in association with mucous membranes. The syndrome is said to occur in connection with some or all of the following risk factors:
  1. Use of broad spectrum antibiotics
  2. Use of oral contraceptives
  3. Ingestion of diets rich in yeast-containing foods or readily utilizable carbohydrates.
  4. Pregnancy
Tremendous attention by public media and health magazines has created a large body of uncritical publications on this topic [="window.status='Cater. 1995. Chronic intestinal candidiasis as a possible etiological factor in the chronic fatigue syndrome. Med...'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00399.htm', 'Webnote00399', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00399.htm" ?>399, ="window.status='Crook. 1992. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and the Yeast Connection. Professional Books, Inc., Jackson, Tenesse....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00486.htm', 'Webnote00486', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00486.htm" ?>486, ="window.status='Crook. 1997. The Yeast Connection Handbook. Professional Books, Inc., Jackson, Tenesse....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00490.htm', 'Webnote00490', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00490.htm" ?>490, ="window.status='Schienfeld. 1987. PMS and candidiasis: study explores possible link. Female. 12:66-73....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02046.htm', 'Webnote02046', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02046.htm" ?>2046, ="window.status='Truss. 1984. Metabolic abnormalities in patients with chronic candidiasis: the acetaldehyde hypothesis. J Orthomo...'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02256.htm', 'Webnote02256', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02256.htm" ?>2256, ="window.status='Truss. 1983. The Missing Diagnosis. Birmingham, Ala., Birmingham, Ala....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02257.htm', 'Webnote02257', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02257.htm" ?>2257, ="window.status='Truss. 1980. Restoration of immunologic competence to Candida albicans. J Orthomol Psychiatry. 9:287-301....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02258.htm', 'Webnote02258', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02258.htm" ?>2258, ="window.status='Truss. 1978. Tissue injury induced by Candida albicans: mental and neurologic manifestations. J Orthomol Psychiat...'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02259.htm', 'Webnote02259', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02259.htm" ?>2259, ="window.status='Wunderlich. 1997. The Candida-Yeast Syndrome. Keats Publishing, Inc, New Canaan, Connecticut....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02459.htm', 'Webnote02459', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02459.htm" ?>2459]. There are no rigorous data to support these concepts. The whole idea is based on historical controls and no working definition has been ever assessed [="window.status='Bennett. 1990. Searching for the yeast connection [editorial; comment] [see comments]. N Engl J Med. 323:1766-7....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00220.htm', 'Webnote00220', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00220.htm" ?>220]. Although brief communications by the proponents have appeared in major journals [="window.status='Crook. 1989. Candida allergy [letter]. J Tenn Med Assoc. 82:272-3....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00483.htm', 'Webnote00483', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00483.htm" ?>483, ="window.status='Crook. 1984. Candida colonization and allergic phenomena [letter]. Hosp Pract (Off Ed). 19:20....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00484.htm', 'Webnote00484', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00484.htm" ?>484, ="window.status='Crook. 1989. Caveman diet and Candida worthy of attention [letter; comment]. Nurse Pract. 14:8-9....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00485.htm', 'Webnote00485', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00485.htm" ?>485, ="window.status='Crook. 1991. A controlled trial of nystatin for the candidiasis hypersensitivity syndrome [letter]. N. Engl. J. M...'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00487.htm', 'Webnote00487', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00487.htm" ?>487, ="window.status='Crook. 1984. Depression associated with Candida albicans infections [letter]. JAMA. 251:2928-9....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00488.htm', 'Webnote00488', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00488.htm" ?>488, ="window.status='Crook. 1993. Vaginal yeast infections exacerbated by sugar intake [letter; comment]. Nurse Pract. 18:8....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00489.htm', 'Webnote00489', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00489.htm" ?>489, ="window.status='Crook. 1999. A yeast connection? [letter]. Nurse Pract. 24:27....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00492.htm', 'Webnote00492', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00492.htm" ?>492], the actual studies performed by these physicians do not appear to have been subjected to peer review. The American Academy of Allergy and Immunology published a position paper in 1986 stating that the concept was "speculative and unproven" [="window.status='Anonymous. 1986. Candidiasis hypersensitivity syndrome. Executive Committee of the American Academy of Allergy and Im...'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00084.htm', 'Webnote00084', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00084.htm" ?>84]. Later, a carefully designed study on the topic by Dismukes et al. demonstrated that the condition does not appear to be reproducible or verifiable [="window.status='Dismukes. 1990. A randomized, double-blind trial of nystatin therapy for the candidiasis hypersensitivity syndrome. ...'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00599.htm', 'Webnote00599', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00599.htm" ?>599].

Clinical Manifestations

There is a broad range of symptoms that have been associated with this syndrome. They can be classified in the following groups, although it is not clear how many or which of them are required to make a diagnosis nor is there scientific data linking these multiple clinical manifestations with Candida albicans overgrowth [="window.status='Bennett. 1990. Searching for the yeast connection [editorial; comment] [see comments]. N Engl J Med. 323:1766-7....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00220.htm', 'Webnote00220', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00220.htm" ?>220, ="window.status='Blonz. 1986. Is there an epidemic of chronic candidiasis in our midst. JAMA. 256:3138-9....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00262.htm', 'Webnote00262', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00262.htm" ?>262]:
  • Vaginal. Recurrent episodes of Candida vaginitis associated with the classic symptoms of pruritus, burning and abnormal discharge.
  • Gastrointestinal. Heartburn, bloating, diarrhea or constipation.
  • Respiratory allergy. Rhinitis, sneezing and/or wheezing.
  • Central nervous system. Anxiety, depression, memory deficits and/or loss of ability to concentrate.
  • Menstrual abnormalities. Severe premenstrual tension and/or menstrual irregularities.
  • Other Systemic Symptoms. Fatigue, headache and/or irritability.
Specific Diagnostic Strategies

The proponents of the existence of this syndrome base their diagnosis on the clinical picture previously discussed [="window.status='Crook. 1997. The Yeast Connection Handbook. Professional Books, Inc., Jackson, Tenesse....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00490.htm', 'Webnote00490', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00490.htm" ?>490, ="window.status='Crook. 1983. The yeast connection: a medical breakthrough. Professional Books, Jackson, Tennesse....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00491.htm', 'Webnote00491', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00491.htm" ?>491, ="window.status='Wunderlich. 1997. The Candida-Yeast Syndrome. Keats Publishing, Inc, New Canaan, Connecticut....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02459.htm', 'Webnote02459', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote02459.htm" ?>2459]. There is no laboratory test that allows a clear identification of patients affected with this presumed disorder. Actually, "no clear definition of the disease has ever been advanced" [="window.status='Bennett. 1990. Searching for the yeast connection [editorial; comment] [see comments]. N Engl J Med. 323:1766-7....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00220.htm', 'Webnote00220', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00220.htm" ?>220]. Considering these facts, it is impossible to set criteria to establish and identify patients affected with this supposed disease.

From a practical viewpoint, we recommend that all women with recurrent vaginitis be carefully evaluated for possible causative factors. Patients with more general complaints should receive a general physical examination. A CBC, general serum chemistries (including liver enzymes), and thyroid studies should be checked to eliminate the possibility of an anemia, subclinical hepatitis, and so forth. Finally, Renfro et al. reported that approximately two-thirds of patients with chronic fatigue had an underlying psychiatric diagnosis [="window.status='Renfro. 1989. Yeast connection among 100 patients with chronic fatigue. Am J Med. 86:165-8....'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote01893.htm', 'Webnote01893', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote01893.htm" ?>1893].

Treatment

Proponents of this syndrome have recommended such therapies as: The value of these therapies is unknown. Dismukes et al. conducted a prospective double-blind study to assess the impact of antifungal therapy on this condition [="window.status='Dismukes. 1990. A randomized, double-blind trial of nystatin therapy for the candidiasis hypersensitivity syndrome. ...'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00599.htm', 'Webnote00599', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00599.htm" ?>599]. This study compared oral and vaginal nystatin with placebo in 42 premenopausal women with the presumed diagnosis of chronic candidiasis. The remarkable finding of this study was that nystatin did not "reduce systemic or psychological symptoms more than placebo did "[="window.status='Dismukes. 1990. A randomized, double-blind trial of nystatin therapy for the candidiasis hypersensitivity syndrome. ...'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00599.htm', 'Webnote00599', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00599.htm" ?>599]. One of the major proponents of the syndrome, Doctor William Crook criticized the study by saying that nystatin is no more than one of the components of the "comprehensive and multimodal therapy" required for this condition [="window.status='Crook. 1991. A controlled trial of nystatin for the candidiasis hypersensitivity syndrome [letter]. N. Engl. J. M...'; return true;" onclick="window.open('../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00487.htm', 'Webnote00487', 'toolbar=no,scrollbars=no,copyhistory=no,status=no,width=400,height=300, win.moveTo(0,0)'); return false;" href="../../../educatio/biblio/Webnote00487.htm" ?>487]. The same author agreed on the urgent need for more scientific studies on the topic. However, a recently done and detailed Medline search on the topic yielded only the data that we have discussed.

Chronic Candidiasis FAQ

We often receive inquiries about the diagnosis and treatment of chronic candidiasis. Here is our FAQ list:
  1. How can I decide if I have chronic candidiasis? Answer: We don't know. The syndrome has never been clearly defined and a workable diagnostic approach has never been put forth. While we have no doubt that there are individuals who suffer from some (or all) of the symptoms listed above, we are not aware of any testing procedure that can link these symptoms to a candidal infection.

  2. My doctor cultured Candida from my stool. What does this mean? Answer: Candida spp. are frequent asymptomatic colonizers of the skin and bowel. Such cultures are of little significance unless you are critically ill in an ICU or are receiving cancer chemotherapy.

  3. I took _______ (name of drug) or I altered my diet to include (or exclude) _______ (name of food) and now I feel better. Doesn't that mean I have (had) chronic candidiasis? Answer: The most common form of this question is "I took fluconazole and now I feel better--does this mean I had chronic candidiasis?" While we're glad you feel better, response to fluconazole is not a diagnostic tool. The various antifungal drugs have effects that go beyond the fungi (for example, fluconazole interacts with the enzyme systems of people, not just of fungi) and many diseases have a natural course of progression and regression. Similar concepts apply to changes in diet. If something makes you feel better, we're delighted for you. We just don't know what it means.

  4. I still really think I might have chronic candidiasis. What should I do? Answer: At the risk of being repetitive, we'll say it again: We don't know of any useful approaches to diagnosing or treating chronic candidiasis. You should see a competent physician and be checked for the things that we do know how to diagnose (see discussion above). If these tests are negative, then we have nothing too specific to offer other than sympathy. We are not denying your symptoms. Rather, we honestly don't know what to do about them. If you can identify something that makes you feel better, then we'll cheer for you!

  5. Is "yeast" the same as Candida? Answer: The term "yeast" is relatively imprecise. Medical mycologists use this term to describe fungi that reproduce predominantly by budding or fission. There are many genera of fungi that fit in this category. Beer and bread makers use the term to refer to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Doctors sometimes use the term "yeast infection" to refer to Candida spp. and its diseases. For example, yeast vaginitis is the colloquial phrase for candidal vaginitis.
http://www.doctorfungus.org/
They are studying these conditons with electron microscopes and no overgrowth of candida or fungus. I am not sure you actually understand the studies you posted.
 
 
 
Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 8/18/2010 10:14 AM (GMT -7)   
FYI

Postgrad Med J. 1992 Jun;68(800):453-4. Related Articles, Links


Comment in:
Postgrad Med J. 1993 Jan;69(807):80.

The role of faecal Candida albicans in the pathogenesis of food-intolerant irritable bowel syndrome.

Middleton SJ, Coley A, Hunter JO.

Department of Gastroenterology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK.

Candida albicans was sought in stool samples from 38 patients with irritable bowel syndrome and 20 healthy controls. In only three patients with irritable bowel syndrome was C. albicans discovered and these patients had either recently received antibiotics or the stool sample had been delayed more than 24 hours in transit. C. albicans was isolated from none of the control stool samples. We conclude that C. albicans is not involved in the aetiology of the irritable bowel syndrome.

PMID: 1437926


"The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy has issued this paper on Allergy testing and treatments."

ASCIA Position Statement:
Unorthodox Techniques for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergy, Asthma and Immune Disorders
Dr Raymond J. Mullins on behalf of the Education Committee, ASCIA October 2004

"INAPPROPRIATE TESTING

Chronic Candidiasis
Use: Treatment of a variety of ailments including allergy, irritable bowel, food allergy and intolerance, autoimmunity, arthritis and psychological conditions.
Method: This approach is based on the concept that imbalance of gut flora results in overgrowth of Candida albicans within the gut. Release of fungal toxins results in a variety of symptoms including fatigue, arthritis, irritable bowel, food intolerance as well as psychological symptoms. These toxins weaken the immune system, predisposing to further symptoms from ingested foods and toxins. Treatment centres on dietary supplements, administration of antifungal drugs such as nystatin, and restriction of "Candida friendly" foods such as those containing sugars, yeast or molds.
Evidence: Candida is a normal gut organism, and immune responses (antibodies, cell mediated responses) to this organism are both expected and observed in healthy controls as well as those allegedly suffering from this condition. There is no evidence of overgrowth of Candida or altered immune responses to this organism in patients complaining of this syndrome. There is neither a scientific rationale nor published evidence that elimination of Candida with diets or anti-fungal therapy is useful for management."


http://www.allergy.o.../unorthodox.htm


"The case for candida as a cause IBS has grown weaker and weaker over the last ten years.

A lot less was known about IBS ten years ago then is known now.

"Why is there candida in the bowel in the first place in humans?

""Candida albicans, and other strains of Candida are yeast that normally inhabits our digestive system: the mouth, throat, intestines and genitourinary tract. Candida is a normal part of the bowel flora (the organisms that naturally live inside our intestines, and are not parasitic). It has many functions inside our digestive tract, one of them to recognize and destroy harmful bacteria. Without Candida albicans in our intestines we would be defenseless against many pathogen bacteria. Healthy person can have a millions of Candida albicans."


about chronic candidiasis
An overgrowth in the gastrointestinal tract of the usually benign yeast (or fungus) Candida albicans has been suggested as the origin of a complex medical syndrome called chronic candidiasis, or yeast syndrome.1 2

Purported symptoms of chronic candidiasis are fatigue, allergies, immune system malfunction, depression, chemical sensitivities, and digestive disturbances.3 4 Conventional medical authorities do acknowledge the existence of a chronic Candida infection that affects the whole body and is sometimes called “chronic disseminated candidiasis.“5 However, this universally accepted disease is both uncommon, and decidedly more narrow in scope, than the so-called Yeast Syndrome—a condition believed by some to be quite common, particularly in people with a history of long-term antibiotic use. The term “chronic candidiasis” as used in this article refers to the as yet unproven Yeast Syndrome."


Real Candidiasis which is a "Systemic Candidiasis are "systemic infections"

http://www.emedicine...erg/topic76.htm

IBS is NOT an infectious disease.


I have talked to quite a few lab people who do colonoscopies about this and they have never seen "yeast syndrome" but have seen "disseminated candidiasis" in aids patients and cancer patients where the immune system was highly compormised.
Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 8/19/2010 9:51 AM (GMT -7)   
Dr Weil on Candida
 
"There is little hard evidence for these ideas. Diagnoses of systemic candidiasis usually have no scientific basis, and most of the recommended treatments for it waste time and money. Anyone with yeast growing in the blood or vital organs would be critically ill in an intensive care unit. Despite this medical reality, systemic candidiasis remains a popular diagnosis in some segments of the alternative medicine community. My belief is that its persistence is an example of our fears of foreign invaders; it satisfies a need to blame our maladies on an external cause."
 
http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/id/QAA125503
Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.
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