New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

zonda101
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 6
   Posted 9/1/2010 1:07 PM (GMT -7)   
Hello everyone ,
My name is Clis and im a new member here that needs advice for all of you .
Been gone to the doctors and gone through endoscopy , blood test and they found nothing and told me its IBS that i have .
Out of the IBS symptoms that i experice is the cramping that i hate the most . My stomach feel like burning inside and that can be last for 24 hr .
My question is what do you guys do when you have that pain ? should i just fasting until the pain is gone or just keep eating regular ?
 
Thanks in advance
 

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 9/1/2010 1:29 PM (GMT -7)   
IBS is a complex condition. There is a lot of information to learn about it all that can really help. There are some treatments for pain and IBS.
 
There is a lot that goes into diet and foods and IBS, although they don't cause IBS. Even the "act of eating" can trigger the colon to spasm. Water can set it off in some people.
 
food info
 
 
 
What were your doctors suggestions and did they give you anything, meds and advise?
 
Importantly this is something all IBSers need to understand as well.
 
Gut Feelings: The Surprising Link Between Mood and Digestion
 
 
What are your symptoms?
 
also you should use this for a while
 

Personal Daily Diary (Online version)

ion>

Use this Personal Daily Diary for 2-4 weeks to help you get the most out of your next doctor visit.

The objective of using this Daily Diary is to gain a better understanding of your bowel disorder

click on the pdf file on the bottom there. Its from the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders and can be quite helpful.
 
 
Take a look at their whole site.
 
 
 
Sometimes you might want to fast, but you should keep eating regularly. Small meals. If you go to long without food and then eat it stresses the bowel.
 
ask away with questions as well. There is a lot of bad ibs information on the internet for sure and some really good information.
 
This is a video library on IBS
 
 
There are some ways to treat pain and discomfort and cramping in IBS. Some might not make sense at first, but when its explained it makes more sense in the big picture of IBS.
 
 
 
IBS Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

zonda101
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 6
   Posted 9/1/2010 1:57 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks Shawan12
 
The general doctor that i have seen he only told me to relax and thats it . The gastro doctor that did endoscopy just told me to stay away from spicy food and dairy product . I never come back his office as he lacked of customer skill . And another Gastro seems ok but its hard to see him as hes really busy . He told me once to take anti spasm but havent taken it yet ( i grew up to not trust any pills into my body i know its weird but thats the way i grew up ) .
 
On daily basis i get bloated , sometime constipated but most of the time i can go to the bathroom 4 x a day which kinda odd for my last doctor as he slight  worried what my body will have left . Those sympton i get accustomed for over time but this cramping my goodness i cant stand it . I only get cramp maybe once a whille ( rare )
 
Thanks in advance

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 9/1/2010 3:29 PM (GMT -7)   
If you don't want to take medications look into these.
 
This can actually work better then most meds.
 
 
I explain a little more when I have some more time.
IBS Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 9/1/2010 3:35 PM (GMT -7)   
FYI

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) would seem to be a disorder that might be amenable to treatment with hypnosis. There is no structural damage and the various possible underlying mechanisms such as disordered motility and visceral (internal) sensitivity might be susceptible to modulation by the mind. Thus, nearly 20 years ago, we undertook the first controlled trial of hypnotherapy in this disorder. The results were extremely encouraging and eventually led us to developing a hypnotherapy unit dedicated to the provision of this service.

Video: about Hypnosis
Several years ago we published an audit of the first 250 patients treated and found that hypnosis not only helps the symptoms of IBS but also significantly improves quality of life.1 Interestingly, it also relieves the additional symptoms from which so many patients with IBS suffer such as nausea, lethargy, backache, and urinary problems. This is in sharp contrast to the medications currently available for IBS, which often help one or two symptoms if at all.

http://www.aboutibs.org/site/about-ibs/management/hypnosis

Why Consider Hypnosis Treatment for IBS?
by Olafur S. Palsson, Psy.D.


Hypnosis is only one of several approaches to treating irritable bowel syndrome and may not be the most suitable option for all patients (click here for discussion of treatment options for IBS). However, hypnosis treatment has some advantages which makes it an attractive option for many IBS sufferers with chronic and severe symptoms:

- It is one of the most successful treatment approaches for chronic IBS. The response rate to treatment is 80% and better in most published studies to date.

- The treatment often helps individuals who have failed to get improvements with other methods (see for example: Whorwell et al., 1984, 1987; Palsson et al., 1997, 2000).

- It is a uniquely comfortable form of treatment; relaxing, easy and generally enjoyable.

- It utilizes the healing power of the person's own mind, and is generally completely without negative side effects.

- The treatment sometimes results in improvement in other symptoms or problems such as migraine or tension headaches, along with the improvement in IBS symptoms.

- The beneficial effects of the treatment last long after the end of the course of treatment. According to research, individuals who improve from hypnosis treatment for IBS can generally look forward to years of reduced bowel symptoms.

http://ibshypnosis.com/whyhypnosis.html
IBS Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

zonda101
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 6
   Posted 9/2/2010 12:05 AM (GMT -7)   
Shawan12
 
Have you done that kind of treament ? If so , do you mind sharing it here what its like . How much does it cost ?
 
Thanks a bunch you are the best
 
 

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 9/2/2010 3:46 PM (GMT -7)   
Yes I have and it was through cds.

http://ibsaudioprogram.com/

I am a webmaster as well as a chef and have been doing HT know for about 10 years. I run that site as a disclaimer for Mike, but there is a long history to it all.

I have also supported 1000's of people who have done this and would support anyone who does here as well. I will also post some more about it all.

I wrote this in 2000 on the IBS self help group.

Ponderings of an IBSer
Originally posted to the IBS Self Help Group in 2000
by Shawn Eric Case
Webmaster for The IBS Audio Program 100, IBSHealth and IBSHope websites.
Moderator for Healingwell.com on IBS



I was just thinking of expressing some of my thoughts on IBS and having it for thirty nine years. I have pain predominate IBS and alternating C and D. Although I can say had and really mean it, as I am doing so much better at about (85%) and I believe still improving thanks to this BB and Mike's tapes.

I believe my IBS started from a trip to Mexico where I swallowed a small amount of chlorinated water out of a swimming pool and a half hour later, I was very sick with amoebic dysentery and spent the next month seriously close to death. No Joke. They also pumped tons of penicillin into me at this time. However, amoebic dysentery is known to cause inflammation in the digestive tract. I recovered from that and I don't remember when or how soon I came back from Mexico, I was suffering from severe abdominal pain and alternating c and d.

It wasn't to long before they started the first tests on me and that that testing would continue on and off for a big part of my life and cost thousands of dollars.
The first tests were stool samples and upper gi tests all negative. The next test was a lower gi, also negative. Blood tests and all the regular tests from a normal MD. I was ten. In those days no one had a clue about IBS and they called it spastic colon or nervous stomach.

I missed a lot of school and was always trying to catch up in my school work.
Since the good doctors couldn't figure it out, I was sent for therapy and put on librium and told it was psychosomatic.

I struggled for years through school, some working and trying to explain to friends why I was in pain a lot and could not do things. Dating was a problem. They thought I had a stomach ache and it would go away and I should just quite being a big baby. Funny because my boss said that to me also, ten years later as well as a lot of coworkers.
More testing. Basically the same kinds of tests over again. When your in your teens and your seeing some upstate NY MD in a small town in those days testing didn't amount to much.

Still no practical advise from anyone on what to do.

My parents were very supportive and my mom is a nurse, which was very helpful and supportive. However, sometimes my moms own concern bothered me as she could not help and I could see that in her eyes while I laid there in complete agony from the knife jabbing sharp pains which sometimes felt like Charlie horses or migraine feelings coming from my gut. When I got these pains I would hyperventilate and all kinds of thoughts raced through my head.

For me this was already establishing itself into my thought patterns on a day to day basis's and I didn't really know much about living any other way as I hit my late teens. I was having episodes at least two to four times a week and that continued until I join this bb two years ago, although I would have some remissions they always came back and for a while my IBS went cyclic and bothered me most in the winter months, but in the summer improved somewhat. But it came back.

Meanwhile, I continued to try to figure some of it out for myself, in ways I could manage it or do things to reduce it. Late teens to late twenties. More tests. "Maybe an ulcer, but we don't see it." New drugs, and from there librax, donnatol, prescription tagament, and a few others I don't even remember, but prozac was one as well. No noticeable long term improvement. Mid thirties. I got serious and went to the best GI doc in town and told him to test away on everything we could think of that might be applicable. Also worried it could be something else still, although nothing showed up before he tested me and after he tested me. More drugs. Bentyl and valium. Sent to therapy told to relieve stress. I knew this wasn't the cause and thought because the pain was so severe that something had to be wrong in there, it just couldn't be possible to have this much pain and not have something physically that they could see wrong. I just didn't get it. I did know stress aggravated it but not to the extent I do now or the kinds of stress either environmental, physical, or psychological and at the time I did not know how to reduce it enough with the management techniques I was using and I used a lot of them. I tried all the food aspects and nothing other then some common sense on most things. Although it made sense what was going in had something to do with it, but in reality looking back now, it was common sense issues of eating to much to fast, fat, spices etc..

There were some weird signals before an attack. My skin would turn whiter, my eyes would twitch and my hands would sweat. Sometimes I would get dizzy.

My therapist had migraines and knew nothing about IBS, other then realizing some of the symptoms sounded somewhat like some symptoms she would get with her migraines and that it was not in my head (psychosomatic or crazy) and I should go back to the doctor. It wasn't helping me to see her so I agreed. Although she didn't explain serotonin to me, nor did my doctor take the time to either. I feel if someone would have explained some of the mind-gut connections earlier I could have save a lot of time and effort. I know some are relatively new, but I think they had some idea and either it was to complicated to explain to me or they just didn't have the time. I think at this point one of the best things a doctor can do is explain some of this to new patients. I didn't have any other issues I was healthily otherwise and was playing soccer for twenty years and going professional until I blew my kneecap out.

I believe I personally have a classic case of IBS. For me I believe it is faulty neurotransmitters that are not talking right between my brain and my gut.

Just some thoughts and thank god for hypnotherapy, which I want to add some of my thoughts on as a side note. Of course most people know I work with Mike now, but some probably do not. After meeting him on the bb here and the success I had I decided to work with him as I feel he has one of the most effective treatment tools for IBS. I am drug free and very happy with the results.

I want to say something about hypnotherapy in general and what I believe and have seen for myself and these are my own personal comments from my experiences with it. Although, many others feel the same way now.

It is the deepest from of relaxation I personally have ever found.

It has tremendously reduced the pain for me from severe to very mild. I think this has worked two ways. It has steered my thoughts and attention away from the pain when I want and I also believe the relaxation aspect of it is releasing endorphins to my gut. This has been a big achievement and will save me trips to the ER.

When I wake up in the morning I no longer have IBS on my mind first thing. I no longer dwell on it. I don't worry to much about going out or bathrooms any more. I know longer turn white or have my hands sweat. I can relax my gut at will.

My whole body is more relaxed in general and I didn't realize how tense it was before.
I breath better and more deeply. Which I have found useful if I feel any twinges of a potential problem.

I sleep better and more deeply. Day to day problems don't bother me like they use to.
I can eat things I couldn't before. I feel like I have been rewired so to speak.
My BM's have improved substantially. There are symptoms I don't even remember and that is unbelievable.

Anyway just some thoughts of an IBSer pondering.

I don't know if this helps anyone and I also don't want to say hypnosis is a cure or the only thing people should be doing to manage IBS, but it is one major effective tool that isn't understood by a lot of people or used enough by doctors in the IBS world and why I sound like a broken record sometimes.

However, I hope no one gets tired of hearing about something that really works for the majority of people with IBS as there are just to few of the things that do.
IBS Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 9/2/2010 3:48 PM (GMT -7)   
By the way I started the hypnotherapy forums on helpforibs with heather and the hypnotherapy forum on the IBS self help group with Jeff.

I also am in close contact with Mike and a leading expert researcher at the unc on hypnotherapy for IBS.

I will also post more real research on it all for you. I highly recommend trying this safe and natural treatment. Either at home which is cost effective or by seeing someone who really knows IBS and HT and knows what they are doing.
IBS Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

zonda101
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 6
   Posted 9/3/2010 11:37 AM (GMT -7)   
Shawn12
 
Thanks for sharing the story . I think im going to give it a try , as a matter of fact , already made an appointment next week hope it turns out great .
 
How often do you do hypnotherapy yourself ?
 
Thanks a bunch

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 9/3/2010 1:55 PM (GMT -7)   
I did the home course and then self taught myself. But its very important the therpaist has IBS experience and the hypnotherapy is Gut directed, not just hypnosis and there are not a lot of people out there who know what there doing.

This is a list.

http://ibshypnosis.com/IBSclinicians.html

or the home course.

There are benefits to see a therapist somewhat but its not a requirement. They all use specific scripts for IBS.
IBS Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 9/3/2010 2:01 PM (GMT -7)   
BY the way I am glad to hear your going to give it a try. Let me know for sure.

Also let me know and I will check out the therapist.

FYI

Questions to Ask a Propsective IBS Hypnotherapist
It's important to thoroughly interview any propsective hypnotherapist you're considering seeing for IBS (spastic colon) treatments. There are IBS-specific questions to ask, and general queries that are necessary as well. Irritable Bowel Syndrome-Specific Questions

Q: How long have you been practicing IBS hypnotherapy?

A. A minimum of 2 years is necessary simply because IBS is a complex syndrome, and there is really no such thing as a typical IBS patient

Q: Can you help IBS sufferers?

A. If they give any other answer than an unqualified, unhesitating "yes" to this question, get up and leave. If they say they're willing to try and treat IBS though they haven't in the past, get up and leave.

Q. What is your success rate with IBS?

A. Hypnotherapists need not only experience with treating IBS but demonstrable success rates, so they should have impressive statistics at their fingertips. A minimum of an 80% reduction in symptoms among patients is to be expected. Ask how they arrived at their figures, whether they conduct follow-throughs with patients, and if so for how long.

Q: What is IBS?

A. A qualified IBS hypnotherapist will know that IBS is a functional digestive disorder with multiple symptoms. They will know that these symptoms can vary, and they should certainly know what the symptoms are. If they can't name a number of symptoms with ease they're simply not familiar with the disorder, and you should find someone else.

Q: How many sessions will it take?



General Questions to Ask
Q: Where did you train, and for how long?

A There are many training organizations, and some are much more credible than others. Check to see that the therapist is a member of an accredited national organization for professional hypnotherapists. (In the US, look for someone who is a member of the American Society for Clinical Hypnosis and/or the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis ASCH. Both organizations restrict their membership to qualified and properly licensed professionals, provide training of high quality, and require their members to adhere to ethics codes that dictate proper uses of clinical hypnosis.)

Q. How much will this cost?

A. You may or may not have insurance coverage for treatments. If you don't, be cautious with payments up front.

Q: Do you receive an audio tape of the session?

A. Progress will result more quickly if you are given an audio tape of the session you have just taken.

Q: Do you have letters from past clients that I can see?

A. Most hypnotherapists who have truly helped people, particularly with a problem as intractable as IBS, receive overwhelming gratitude from their patients in return. At a minimum the therapist should be able to offer you a telephone referral to past patients who are willing and happy to discuss their treatment and results.

Q: Do you offer a pre-session consultation?

A. All patients are different, particularly when it comes to IBS, so this is a necessity. It is how a therapist gathers information about you and prepares a treatment aimed at your specific needs and goals.

One question the hypnotherapist should absolutely ask you: have you been thoroughly examined and diagnosed with IBS by a medical doctor? If they don't ask you this they're not qualified, as any hypnotherapist familiar with IBS will know that it cannot be self-diagnosed.

hope that helps
IBS Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

zonda101
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 6
   Posted 9/4/2010 9:15 PM (GMT -7)   
shawn12
 
Thanks for your story , thats really inspiring  . I will tell how it go next week .
Do you think i should see a dietician ? Yesterday i went to see accupunture just for the hell of it . I told them i have IBS , they are not really sure what ibs was , so i had to tell them . They put needles on my stomach and were trying to get me drink somekind of chinesse herb but i said no thank . I had nothing against it but its just i dont want to deal with cramping and all that from eating something i dont know about . I dont know if accupunture helped me but thats really an interesting experience .
 
Funny thing is , they said i should not be worry too much about ibs and made it sound like im a cry baby . Oh God , I am not a complainer and i hate that but im just a human being not some kind of super hero who can be super every single day . So the whole time i just smile when  they lectured me about being thankful and all that , i know they meant well .
 
thanks a bunch

kim123
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1201
   Posted 9/6/2010 11:29 AM (GMT -7)   
Shawn- thanks for sharing your story; very interesting. I was wondering as I read it if you think the doses of antibiotics could have contributed in any way to your IBS?- at least initially. Do you keep certain foods out of your diet today?- or do you eat pretty well anything?

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 9/6/2010 6:04 PM (GMT -7)   
Yeah, don't see anyone who doesn't know about IBS and how they maybe able to help you treat it. If they have no experince its not likely they are going to be able to help.
Its funny you mentioned they don't know much and then gave you that advise. LOL
 
Dietians, might be able to help and I recommend them over nutritionists.
 
Kim, it was very severe amoebic dysentery that really almost killed me. I had the symptoms for a month. I had what they call projectile vomiting and d that was worse then any IBS ever, way worse and dizziness to the point of not being able to see almost for that month and a really high fever. They gave me three shots of penicillin a day with this really long needle. But again they thought I was really gonna die from it.
 
I don't think antibiotics contributed to my IBS nor is there really any literature on antibiotics causing IBS, but the amoebic dysentery itself inflammed my colon and caused Post Infectious IBS and changed the cells embedded in my gut, importantly enterochromaffin and mast cells, which work for digestion and also communicate with the brain. Much more is known about all this with Post Infectious IBS studies in the last ten years, especially the last five.
 
This is where a person gets an enteric infection, like I did and the inflammation goes away and leaves changes in the gut.
 
This is a good artcile on it all from 2005 and a lot more is known now.
 
 
"Recent studies have overthrown the dogma that irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by no abnormality of structure by demonstrating low-grade lymphocytic infiltration in the gut mucosa, increased permeability and increases in other inflammatory components including enterochromaffin and mast cells. Furthermore, increased inflammatory cytokines in both mucosa and blood have been demonstrated in irritable bowel syndrome. While steroid treatment has proved ineffective, preliminary studies with probiotics exerting an anti-inflammatory effect have shown benefit.
Summary: The study of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome has revealed the importance of low-grade inflammation in causing irritable bowel syndrome symptoms. It has suggested novel approaches to irritable bowel syndrome including studies of serotonin and histamine metabolism which may be relevant to other subtypes of of the disease."
 
A lot about IBS has been learned from PI IBS studies. PI IBS is also a demonstratable brain gut axis dysfuntion.
 
I do not eat certain foods, but its not a long list really. No soda and no gas producing vegs, usally, but sometimes I will eat brocolli or something. I eat diary.  As a chef I have had to eat a lot of foods over the last 20 years. But there are a few I stay away from, some I don't like anyway. However, I have noticed a patter of the "act of eating" not eating enough and then eating a lot or at all, more then foods themselves on the whole. Also I don't over do fruits. However as I get older my doctor wants be to eat more fruits and vegetables for the heart.
 
 
 
 
 
 
IBS Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

kim123
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1201
   Posted 9/7/2010 6:11 PM (GMT -7)   
Geez- That must have been a very scary time in your life. Glad you pulled through. How long were you sick?
 
So, was your colon irreparably damaged? What seems to be the prevalent cause(s) for IBS these days, and have the theories changed over the years?

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 9/9/2010 10:06 AM (GMT -7)   
I was extremely sick for a month, then another to fully recover. I was in Mexico for six months. It was a close call.

"So, was your colon irreparably damaged?" I believe cell changes took place for sure, the ones they have found in other PI IBSers and in IBS. But this is not damaged like one might think, but changed. Yes. The back and forth communication of my gut brain axis has been changed.

Some of the strongest evidence to problems in IBS are still serotonin regulation and releases from cells in the gut and mast cells. There also seems to be issues with the brain as well. There seems to be a bunch of domino kind of effects going on in the system. There is a good video on all this, but its down at the moment but will post it soon. The system is so complex, there are a lot of things to study, some theories have changed and some have gotten stronger. Quite a bit still needs to be researched. I will post some info for you.
IBS Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 9/9/2010 10:20 AM (GMT -7)   
Kim, its worth reading this to start

History of Functional Disorders

http://www.med.unc.edu/medicine/fgidc/historyfunctionaldisorders.pdf
IBS Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

kim123
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1201
   Posted 9/9/2010 2:04 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks, Shawn. I'll get a chance to check it out later, perhaps on the weekend, when work settles down for the week.

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 9/10/2010 10:56 AM (GMT -7)   
No problem Kim. ;)

I have gone through perhaps ten's of thousands of papers on it all over the last ten years. ;)
IBS Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.

lizabeth8719
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2010
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 9/20/2010 10:47 AM (GMT -7)   
What about the link between IBS symptoms and food allergies/intolerances? As one of the leading causes of IBS symptoms, it is not one to ignore. Check out "Treating Irritable Bowel Syndrome with a Food Elimination Diet Followed by Food Challenge and Probiotics" Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol. 25, No. 6, 514-522. There is also some helpful information explaining this through the IBS Treatment Center online resources. Another great article explaining the link between IBS and allergenic foods is "The therapeutic effects of eliminating allergic foods according to food-specific IgG antibodies in irritable bowel syndrome" Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi. 2007 Aug;46(8):641-3.

kim123
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 1201
   Posted 9/20/2010 3:09 PM (GMT -7)   
lizabeth- my IBS symptoms appear if I eat any foods with yeast, or too many foods with processed sugar, so I realize I have a yeast intolerance. I know IBS is more complicated than just that, but for me, that tends to be my "trigger".

shawn12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1293
   Posted 9/21/2010 11:12 AM (GMT -7)   
izabeth8719

food allergies and food intolerances are not the same one is an immune response the other is not. Neither are the "leading causes of IBS symptoms" These are separate conditions to IBS. Foods are not the cause of IBS and this has been known for quite a while now although some still promote it for money.

The "IBS Treatment Center online resources" I believe as do many others posts inaccurate information on their website about ibs. IBS and celiac for example are NOT the same conditions, they use the term IBS inaccurately to mean any GI upset. That is not the case at all. IBS is a distinct functional disorder of the large bowel.


What Patients Know about Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and What They Would Like to Know
National Survey on Patient Educational Needs in IBS and Development and Validation of the Patient Educational
Posted 09/18/2007

Albena Halpert, M.D.; Christine B. Dalton, PA-C; Olafur Palsson, Psy.D.; Carolyn Morris, Ph.D.; Yuming Hu, Ph.D.; Shrikant Bangdiwala, Ph.D.; Jane Hankins; Nancy Norton; Douglas Drossman, M.D.

Abstract and Introduction
Abstract
Patient education improves clinical outcomes in patients with chronic illness, but little is known about the education needs of patients with IBS.
Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify: (1) patients perceptions about IBS; (2) the content areas where patients feel insufficiently informed, i.e., "knowledge gaps" about diagnosis, treatment options, etiology, triggers, prognosis, and role of stress; and (3) whether there are differences related to items 1 and 2 among clinically significant subgroups.
Methods: The IBS-Patient Education Questionnaire (IBS-PEQ) was developed using patient focus groups and cognitive item reduction of items. The IBS-PEQ was administered to a national sample of IBS patients via mail and online.
Analysis: Frequencies of item endorsements were obtained. Clinically relevant groups, (a) health care seekers or nonhealth care seekers and (:( users or nonusers of the Web, were identified and grouped as MD/Web, MD/non-Web, and non-MD/Web.
Results: 1,242 patients completed the survey (371 via mail and 871 online), mean age was 39.3 ± 12.5 yr, educational attainment 15 ± 2.6 yr, 85% female, IBS duration 6.9 ± 4.2 yr, 79% have seen an MD for IBS in the last 6 months, and 92.6% have used the Web for health information. The most prevalent IBS misconceptions included (% of subjects agreeing with the statement): IBS is caused by lack of digestive enzymes (52%), is a form of colitis (42.8%), will worsen with age (47.9%), and can develop into colitis (43%) or malnutrition (37.7%) or cancer (21.4%). IBS patients were interested in learning about (% of subjects choosing an item): (1) foods to avoid (63.3%), (2) causes of IBS (62%), (3) coping strategies (59.4%), (4) medications (55.2%), (5) will they have to live with IBS for life (51.6%), and (6) research studies (48.6%). Patients using the Web were better informed about IBS.
Conclusion: (1) Many patients hold misconceptions about IBS being caused by dietary habits, developing into cancer, colitis, causing malnutrition, or worsening with age; (2) patients most often seek information about dietary changes; and (3) educational needs may be different for persons using the internet for medical information.

Introduction
Because of the impact of chronic conditions on health status and health care expenditures, managing chronic illness is one of the major challenges of modern medicine. Consequently, there is growing interest in effective educational programs, to provide patients with the necessary knowledge, skills, and confidence (self-efficacy) to manage their disease-related problems.

The goal of patient education is to facilitate changes in patient behavior for the purpose of disease management or prevention. While different health education theories focus on many different aspects of this complicated process, most agree that facilitating change of behavior requires incorporating the patients' current knowledge, prior disease experiences, attitudes, goals, motivations, and cultural perceptions. The existing literature describes educational interventions based on a variety of health education models (e.g., health belief model, the theory of planned behavior, or theory of self-efficacy) in search of effective educational models for the management of diabetes, hypertension, arthritis, and cancer. However, relatively little is known about what constitutes an effective patient education model in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other functional bowel disorders. The emerging research typifies IBS as a brain-gut disorder where psychosocial factors (e.g., stress, cognitions, coping, etc.) can alter the symptoms and illness experience for better or worse. Due to these and other disease specific characteristics, that are amenable to education, we believe effective educational interventions may significantly impact the management of this common disorder. Prior to designing, studying, and implementing theory based educational strategies for IBS, we need to better understand patients' disease experience, knowledge, misconceptions, motivations, and perceptions. Few studies to date have evaluated IBS "through the patients' eyes" and none have systematically examined patients' prior knowledge about IBS.

--------------------------------------------------------------

Current Knowledge and Misconceptions about IBS
The majority of participants were able to correctly identify the symptoms and triggers of IBS. Stress at work and psychological factors were identified as triggers by more than 70% of subjects. Of note is that a significant number of patients held misconceptions, including that IBS can develop into: colitis (43% agree, 29.7% not sure), malnutrition (37.7% agree, 33% not sure), a problem needing surgery (34.3% agree, 33% not sure), and cancer (21.4% agree and 36.3% not sure). In addition, a significant number of responders thought that IBS results from lack of digestive enzymes (52.1% agree and 28.2% not sure) and would worsen with age (47.9% agreed and 30.4% not sure). The majority of the participants were optimistic that new treatments will be soon available for IBS (62.6% agreed, 27.8% not sure). See Table 3 , Table 4 , Table 5 and Table 6 for correct conceptions and misconceptions (the latter shown in italics) about IBS. Regarding knowledge about lifestyle modifications as a treatment for IBS, subjects endorsed mainly eating small meals, a high fiber, low fat diet, and avoiding milk products. Nondietary lifestyle modifications such as exercise were not frequently endorsed ( Table 7 ). The majority of our subjects were familiar with first-line treatments for IBS such as antispasmodics, antidiarrheals, and fiber agents. A total of 35% endorsed antidepressants, 16% tegaserod, and 5% alosetron ( Table 8 ). When asked if psychological treatments (cognitive behavior therapy, relaxation techniques, etc.) are potential treatments for IBS, 29.1% of participants disagreed, 41.7% agreed, and 21.4% were neutral/not sure.

Educational Needs Regarding IBS
Subjects were primarily interested in learning about what foods to avoid, causes of IBS, and coping strategies. In addition, more than 50% of responders wondered if IBS will shorten their lives, how psychological factors affect IBS, and what medications they can use to prevent an IBS "attack." Of note is that close to half of the participants wanted to know about what is a normal bowel habit, whether IBS will get worse and about available IBS research. See Table 9 and Table 10 for more detailed results on patient educational needs.

IBS Educational Needs Regarding IBS in Subgroups
Patients who used the Web, regardless of clinic status, seemed better informed about IBS and held fewer misconceptions (e.g., had less need to know what IBS is, or whether it will shorten their lives), and more interested in learning about the causes of IBS, foods to avoid, and coping strategies ( Table 13 ). Finally, based on our findings we created a summary of an IBS patient profile regarding IBS knowledge and educational needs ( Table 14 ).

===================

Discussion
Educating patients about their illnesses improves adherence to treatment, quality of life, and satisfaction with care.

___________________________________

Our survey identified what IBS patients in the United States know about their condition and what their educational needs are in regard to IBS. There are several key findings, which have implications for the way in which clinicians needs to offer education.

Patients' Misconceptions about Implications of IBS: Patients hold misconceptions about IBS developing into cancer, colitis, causing malnutrition, or shortening the life expectancy. Such misconceptions can produce great concern, anxiety, and reluctances to accept reassurance, particularly if the physician is not aware of them. This only reinforces a vicious cycle of health worry and urgent requests for diagnosis, along with increased physician visits and demands for more testing.[14] Thus it is important for educational materials to explicitly identify and address these misconceptions. In addition, clinicians need to proactively inquire about the patient's beliefs and concerns (e.g., "What do you think is causing your symptoms?" and "What are your concerns about them?"). Eliciting these thoughts and feelings will have a palliative effect on health anxiety and will lead to a more therapeutic response when the reassurance occurs within the context of the patient's expressed concerns.


Patients Seek Information Primarily about Food and Diet: Our data highlight the strong attribution patients make about the role of diet in IBS. Patients most often seek information about dietary changes and the role of food in contributing to IBS (reflected in concerns about "what foods to avoid?"). Yet because of the limited evidence for dietary factors being causative in IBS, physicians often are unable or unwilling to offer specific advice on diet. Nevertheless, our data support the importance of addressing this topic, and to educate against idiosyncratic food practices that may occur. For patients who focus excessively on unnecessary food elimination in seeking relief from IBS symptoms, it may be helpful to explain gut physiology and introduce the possibility that the ingestion of food in general, rather than specific foods, may be triggering the symptoms. Importantly, overly restrictive diets need to be replaced by recommendations for a well-balanced diet.


Patients Associate IBS with Triggers and Distress: Notably 70% of the study subjects agreed that there is a connection between their symptoms and psychological distress. However, this report contrasts with our clinical experience, since patients less frequently volunteer this association in the clinical setting, possibly out of fear of stigmatization, or the perception that this is "all in my head." Thus it is important for the clinician to be open to this option but to inquire in a matter of fact manner: "Are there any other factors that can worsen your symptoms, like diet, physical activity, or stress?" In addition to obtaining potentially meaningful clinical data that will help treatment, this approach conveys a high level of acceptance of this association as a matter of course rather than it being a "psychiatric" problem. The high level of acceptance of stress as an operative factor in IBS may relate to the population that is being drawn from the community rather than referral settings. With the latter group, the high psychosocial morbidity is associated with denial of a role for stress.[15, 16]


Patients Consider IBS a Diagnosis of Exclusion: Over 50% of the patients considered IBS to be a "catch all" diagnosis and another 22% were unsure. While this could reflect the information provided by their physicians (thus highlighting the need to also educate physicians about IBS), this misconception may motivate patients to seek more and more diagnostic studies to find "the cause." The use of the Rome criteria[17] permits the patient to have a positive diagnosis. With confidence in knowing that IBS is a specific entity, such behaviors are minimized. Thus it is important for the physician to provide proper education about the level of confidence in the diagnosis.


Web Users are More Informed about IBS: We found that IBS patients who use the Web have better knowledge about IBS in general, fewer IBS misconceptions, and are more aware of psychosocial disturbances being associated with flares. They also seem more "up to date" with commonly used medications and more interested in learning coping strategies. The implication of this finding is that the nature and content of educational interventions will differ for Web and non-Web users with IBS. Prior data suggest that more than 50% of Americans use the Web and about 52% have used the Web for obtaining medical information.[18] Similarly, the majority of our participants have used the Web for obtaining medical information (92.6%), suggesting that future Web-designed educational interventions will probably be well accepted. For the clinician, it suggests that the type of education provided (e.g., Web sites vs brochures) and its content (i.e., the educational level of the information) must be individualized to the learning style of the patient.


Our study has several limitations. First, enrollment bias exists, since subjects interested in participating in the study may have had a higher level of education and greater motivation to learn than other patients, and they may also be more symptomatic at the time of enrollment, than the average IBS patient. However, the results would certainly apply to any patient seeking or willing to receive educational information. The findings for this study group are clinically relevant since they result from a symptomatic IBS population likely to utilize health care. A subgroup of non-consulters may have different educational needs. We also think it is important that future efforts be directed toward studies that may increase interest in learning. Another limitation relates to the relevance of the information collected from subjects not recruited from internal medicine or GI clinics (e.g., online subjects). Some respondents may have entered the study without having IBS merely to obtain the compensation offered. We implemented several measures to minimize this possibility. The study was advertised only on IBS-related Web sites, subjects had to meet Rome II criteria for IBS, had to be invited to participate, and those who qualified by the screening questions did not receive the main questionnaire immediately. Instead, they were e-mailed an entry password 24-72 hr later. This made multiple attempts to qualify for participation by the same individuals unlikely. Furthermore, participants had to provide a mailing address to receive the payment, which avoided the possibility for multiple entries coming from the same person. Finally, we acknowledge that the nature of this instrument, to assess individual knowledge and informational needs, is not amenable to standard methods to assess criterion or construct validity. There is no "gold standard," and relative to other patient report instruments, such as a health related quality of life instrument, one cannot do convergent or discriminate validity with known groups because there are no other psychometric measures to correlate with the instrument. Furthermore, there are no known groups to identify since all responses are specific to the individual. However, as noted in the methods, the use of three focus groups with a broad clinical representation to generate items, and then the use of cognitive debriefing with the investigators and a sample of 50 patients, permitted the selection of the most representative sample of items that were then applied in the quantitative analysis.

-----------------------------------------

Conclusion
Our study is the first to define the conceptions, misconceptions, and educational needs of a large national sample of IBS patients. We found that many patients hold misconceptions about the condition, some of which may negatively impact patients' emotional well-being and increase their health care needs. According to our data, patients are mostly interested in dietary modifications, and learning about coping strategies and what causes IBS. Patients who use the Web have fewer misconceptions about the disease and may differ in their educational needs from non-Web users. The results of the study can be used in both daily clinical practice and as a basis for developing a variety of patient-centered IBS educational interventions.

http://www.medscape....warticle/562448

"Many patients hold misconceptions about IBS being caused by dietary habits, developing into cancer, colitis, causing malnutrition, or worsening with age; (2) patients most often seek information about dietary changes"
IBS Forum Moderator


I am not a doctor. All information I present is for educational purposes only and should not be subsituted for the advise of a qualified health care provider.

Please make sure you have your symptoms diagnosed by a medical practitioner or a doctor.
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Saturday, December 10, 2016 3:23 PM (GMT -7)
There are a total of 2,736,054 posts in 301,351 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 151448 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, Twingirldc.
292 Guest(s), 13 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
NM12, TotesMagotes, Michael_T, mark34, Gear, summer16, Girlie, Twingirldc, Traveler, brucen36, gilly2, Nomar Lupron 4 Me, lapilot


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2016 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer