Working When You Have IBS

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Jade25
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 79
   Posted 8/15/2006 1:15 PM (GMT -7)   
Hello everyone,
 
I hope the day finds you well. What jobs do you think best suit the sufferers of IBS?
 
I'm starting school soon, after having to leave last year due to my back problem and IBS symptoms. I am going for a much less demanding program, as nursing proved to be too much for my body to handle. It still saddens me to give up that dream, but we all have our purpose to fulfill and our lessons to learn - I am certain one of my major lessons in this life is to accept that I will be held back by physical limitations now, but that if I try I will succeed in other areas that don't require much use of my body.
 
How do you cope with your job? I know the ideal set up would be to work from home, but it's my desire to do something that helps people (which I am sure you *can* do from home, but it's just not for me).
 
~ Jade
Diagnosed with IBS in 2006
IBS symptoms since 1998
Chronic Back Injury since 2005
 

“Kindness is an inner desire that makes us want to do good things even if we do not get anything in return. It is the joy of our life to do them. When we do good things from this inner desire, there is kindness in everything we think, say, want and do.” ~ Emanuel Swedenborg

 


Sarita
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 2486
   Posted 8/15/2006 1:45 PM (GMT -7)   
I've been working in social services with emotionally disturbed kids for the past four years.  It's a bit stressful, but it's preparing me for medical school (hopefully starting in 2007).  When I have my bad days, my job is pretty understanding - we have sick leave bank, which means if you use up your sick leave and have a debilitating medical condition you can receive up to 200 hours of extra sick leave for the year.  It saved my arse last year when I had surgery and out-of-state hospital visits, etc.  Make sure when you get a new job they have good insurance and leave benefits!

Jade25
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 79
   Posted 8/15/2006 1:52 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks, Sarita, that is good advice. I worked with kids in that position too, and when I was hurt it was on the job, which at the time was with developmentally disabled adults. I miss my work so much, it still can bring tears to my eyes when I think of the great clients I had to leave behind.
 
I hope I find an employer willing to take me on, since my back injury took me out of work for almost 2 years now, and the IBS is a constant ongoing problem. I'll be honest with them, and hope for the best.
Good luck in medical school. Working with the kids will easily prepare you, without a doubt. I had been hoping to work as a nurse for the developmentally disabled. That would have been so wonderful! But, maybe I can volunteer in the future, or perhaps I'll get well enough to pursue a nursing career in the future.
 
~ Jade
Diagnosed with IBS in 2006
IBS symptoms since 1998
Chronic Back Injury since 2005
 

“Kindness is an inner desire that makes us want to do good things even if we do not get anything in return. It is the joy of our life to do them. When we do good things from this inner desire, there is kindness in everything we think, say, want and do.” ~ Emanuel Swedenborg

 


Keriamon
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 2976
   Posted 8/15/2006 2:23 PM (GMT -7)   
If you have worked with disabled adults and are interested in nursing, you could try what my mother did for a while which was private duty nursing. She basically sat with old people (and occasionally severely handicapped children and adults) who had money enough to recieve nursing-home care at home. She didn't care for it much because it was really boring; she sat a lot and did a lot of cross stitch and watched t.v. But I daresay your giving up nursing is partly because of the time you have to spend on your feet; private duty is a lot of sitting. And because it's not demanding, you can be in the bathroom frequently if you need to, or curl up on the couch until you feel better. There may be some phsyical aspects, like turning a bed-ridden patient, but that may can be done by an aide; they usually come in and do the bathing and stuff, not the nurse.

Something with a bit more work involved, but less skills needed is sitting for adults who don't need a nurse, but do need someone to cook for them and do some light housekeeping, maybe run errands and take them to doctor appointments and make sure they take their medicine. I see ads in the paper all the time with people wanting someone to stay the day with a parent that's not ill enough for a nursing home, but doesn't really need to be cooking or driving either. That kind of job wouldn't come with benefits, unless you worked through some sort of placement company, but who better to understand your bowel problems than an old person? Lol. You can compare ailments!

The other place you can look at is to work with a senior citizen apartment complex or retirement community as an on-site nurse, activity coordinator, etc. My mother has even worked a desk job in a hospital working with the insurance companies to get people's hospital stays approved (called "pre-certing"). She also worked in a carpet factory handling worker's comp insurance claims and doing first-aid and taking people, when necessary, to the hospital. Have to be able to handle severed body parts to do that, though. But, anyways, there's a lot of nursing jobs out there that don't require a lot of standing or physical movement that would hurt your back. And the medical field is always a good place to be when you're chronically sick because everyone is much more understanding and old people will claim your poots as their own, LOL!

lcr319
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 38
   Posted 8/15/2006 8:42 PM (GMT -7)   
I wouldn't recomend the newspaper field that is what got me into this mess (ibs). You will find there is stress in every job at some point. What you need is a job that gives you a liberal sick/personal day plan. Usually state jobs are a good bet. Most states also have programs that help people with disabilities (most illnesses are considered disabilities) get jobs with out taking civil service exams and provide reasonable accomodations for your illness.
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