Body Temperature Question

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Jade25
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 79
   Posted 10/26/2006 6:09 PM (GMT -7)   
I've been thinking a lot lately about my constant cold condition. That is, I **always** feel cold. I have taken my temperature at random times (when I've not drank or ate anything for at least 20 minutes) and sometimes it is as low as 35 degrees Celsius. I just took it now and it was 36.2 degrees Celsius.
 
What would cause my body to be lower than 37 degrees Celsius? Even when I feel like I'm running a fever, it doesn't register much past 37 degrees.
 
Does anyone know anything about this?
 
 
Diagnosed with IBS in 2006
IBS symptoms since 1998
Chronic Back Injury since 2005
 

“Kindness is an inner desire that makes us want to do good things even if we do not get anything in return. It is the joy of our life to do them. When we do good things from this inner desire, there is kindness in everything we think, say, want and do.” ~ Emanuel Swedenborg

 


CathyA
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 1431
   Posted 10/27/2006 6:30 AM (GMT -7)   
My ignorance is showing, since I'm not sure what farenheight temp that is, but I think lots of people have "below normal" basal temps. I know mine is usually 97 F and sometimes less.
As far as it meaning something is wrong.......it could be nothing........or it could be something like hypothyroidism. I have fibromyalgia, and I know lots of us with this condition have sub-normal temps. I used to be sub-normal, even if I felt hot all day. Since you are always cold, I'd have my thyroid checked out.
Also.....are you on any meds that would make you feel cold? Some meds have that as a possible side-effect.........like doxycycline, beta blockers, and others.

Jade25
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 79
   Posted 10/27/2006 8:35 AM (GMT -7)   
I'm not on any medications, except loperamide as a PRN.
 
I've always been this way, though. I weigh about 95lbs, but even when I was up to 120lbs I was still cold. Not just chilly, but to the point of wearing sweaters in plus 30 degree (Celsius) weather.
 
I was thinking possibly my thyroid, but I don't think all my symptoms point to that. I have pretty much all of the symptoms of Fibromyalgia, but I know there's little anyone could do for me if that were the case. I know Fibromyalgia is a serious condition, but I have had a few too many doctors shrug it off, as they do for IBS.
 
I'm sick of feeling like a hypochondriac, so you can imagine my hesitation when bringing up anything else... but I am getting worried because I keep having these "spells" and they're getting more and more frequent. Basically, I'll be going about my business, and all of a sudden my heart feels weird, I get a wave of either nausea or dizziness, and I'm "gone" for a second... I feel like I'm about to fall over, or that all my extremeties are numb - when this happens, I keep pinching at my hands and legs or feet, and I don't feel the pain I should, I feel a poke or something... but it's not right. I guess I'm just tired of trying to prove something is wrong, but if I keep having these things it may develop into something more... what do you guys think?


Diagnosed with IBS in 2006
IBS symptoms since 1998
Chronic Back Injury since 2005
 

“Kindness is an inner desire that makes us want to do good things even if we do not get anything in return. It is the joy of our life to do them. When we do good things from this inner desire, there is kindness in everything we think, say, want and do.” ~ Emanuel Swedenborg

 


Keriamon
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Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 2976
   Posted 10/31/2006 12:17 PM (GMT -7)   
Do you routinely have low blood pressure? That can cause sudden dizzy spells. It may cause numbness if your heart isn't getting the blood pumped to your extremities well enough. In any case, numbness in your extremities is never a good sign and can be linked to heart problems, diabetes, etc., so you really ought to see a doctor about that one. If you feel like your regular docs blow you off, maybe you should go see some new doctor and just "forget" to tell him about your IBS (as this isn't a symptom of it anyways). Maybe a new doc that's not prejudiced can find out what's wrong with you.

When I lost some weight a couple of years ago, I suddenly started to have a lower tolerance to cold (of course, this was also several months after starting on birth control for the first time, so hormones may be the real problem). I am still somewhat cold-natured, even though I've gained all the weight back. But I'm not complaining a whole lot--Tennessee is hotter a whole lot more than it is cold and my tolerance to heat seems to have increased even while I'm less tolerant to the cold.

CathyA
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 1431
   Posted 10/31/2006 12:41 PM (GMT -7)   
I wonder if you mitral valve prolapse, or some sort of tachycarida syndrome. Both of those might make you feel faint. I agree, it's time for a new doc.

Jade25
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 79
   Posted 10/31/2006 1:07 PM (GMT -7)   
I just called a special number we have in the city that allows you to discuss a problem with a nurse, and she urged me to seek out urgent care due to the constant numbness and palpitations... I told her I have a hard time getting people to help me because I'm underweight and look really young ("You're WAY too young to have those problems, blah blah blah")... I don't have time tonight, but I guess it wouldn't kill me to go on Friday night, in case they do want to monitor my heart for 24 hours. I feel stupid though... so foolish, because I always have something going on with my health, and I don't want my partner to worry or think yet another thing is wrong. :( And really, what are the odds something is also wrong with my heart? The RN also said it could be my thyroid... *sigh* And when they ask if I have any other health problems, do I have to own up to the IBS? Because they might hear that and go "Meh... she's obviously over-sensitive or a hypochondriac".

The RN said it has nothing to do with my weight or low BP... but those might be a factor in whatever is the problem.

Could I just be prone to heart palpitation attacks with numbness of the extremeties, and tingling, SOB, and low BP? Or does it have to be because of something? I don't want to go through more tests... but I also don't want to drop dead because I didn't check something out. :(

I need help, I think.
Diagnosed with IBS in 2006
IBS symptoms since 1998
Chronic Back Injury since 2005
 

“Kindness is an inner desire that makes us want to do good things even if we do not get anything in return. It is the joy of our life to do them. When we do good things from this inner desire, there is kindness in everything we think, say, want and do.” ~ Emanuel Swedenborg

 


Keriamon
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 2976
   Posted 10/31/2006 3:20 PM (GMT -7)   
My dad's ex-wife's sister died in her early or mid-thirties of a heart attack. Her family was shocked until they discovered her diary and found out that she had been going to the doctor for heart problems for some time.

I think it's important to tell your family--including partner--what kind of problems you're having so they don't get such a hard shock if something does go bad wrong. And death isn't the only hard shock they can get. I mean, what if you fainted and your partner had to get the ambulance in to get you and she couldn't tell them what all problems you were having or even suspected of having? It's a lot harder to treat someone for passing out without reason than it is to treat someone with a known problem, like heart trouble or low blood pressure or suspected thyroid problems.

And, unfortunately, you're NEVER too young to have a heart problem. Look at all those kids who keep dying on Disney rides. Picture of health until they get on the roller coaster or centrifuge, and only when the autopsy's done do they find they had a congenital birth defect in their heart all the time and a little bit of physical stress caused them to have a heart attack (don't go to any theme parks or carnivals until you get your heart looked at!). While clogged arteries and high blood pressure are generally older people's problems, heart defects, murmurs and the like no know age limits. And, sadly, many of those heart problems can be repaired if they just find them before they take a ride on The Pirates of the Carribean: Hurricane Season.

My personal opinion would be not to mention IBS unless a doctor specifically asks if you have gut problems. That's not linked to the problems that you're having now that I'm aware of (though you should answer honestly if he asks because he might be looking for other clues--who knows, bad thyroids may cause gut problems). I agree that a lot of doctors tend to blow off people with IBS--maybe not because they think they are hypochondriacs so much as they honestly believe that IBS manifests itself as ear aches and joint pain and period irregularlity and everything else the body can come up with in all its many parts. Like I keep harping on, nothing says you can't have more than one problem at a time. And you can even have multiple stomach problems at once!

CathyA
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 1431
   Posted 11/1/2006 10:42 AM (GMT -7)   
Jade,
What kind of doctor did you see originally, who made you feel like you were worried about nothing? I would see a different doc. A good internal medicine doc should be able to handle it all.
Of course you should get your heart checked out, but palpitations can be caused by a ton of other conditions. Many people have palpitations that aren't at all dangerous. There are many conditions that might cause your symptoms. You just need a really good work-up.
I, personally, would tell them about your IBS. But please don't be apologetic or meek. You are feeling what you are feeling, and you should not be made to feel like a hypochondriac. I think sometimes, if we go into a doctor's appointment and act insecure, they are going to treat us that way. Tell him your symptoms with confidence, and should anyone imply your symptoms aren't real, then stand up to them, and tell them they are most definitely real.
You really are seeming to have low thyroid symptoms. When our circulation constricts, it can make our hands feel numb. Whenever our skin's blood vessels constrict, it makes us feel cold.
I'm sure a good internist will solve this mystery for you. But you have to keep insisting that someone help you. Good luck Jade, and keep us posted.

Canyonbabe711
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 1451
   Posted 11/1/2006 11:27 PM (GMT -7)   
It could definetly be your thyroid as it can cause all kinds of weird things, stomach problems, rapid heart beat, low temp though usually the low temp is for underactive but the coldness is another sign. It is worth getting checked out. Get the whole thyroid blood test not just the TSH though to get a better picture.

Jade25
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 79
   Posted 11/4/2006 9:52 AM (GMT -7)   
Well, had the EKG, a blood glucose test, and the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone test.
 
All are "relatively normal"
 
I guess I'll just stop worrying about myself when I have an attack, because apparently I'm a-ok.
Diagnosed with IBS in 2006
IBS symptoms since 1998
Chronic Back Injury since 2005
 

“Kindness is an inner desire that makes us want to do good things even if we do not get anything in return. It is the joy of our life to do them. When we do good things from this inner desire, there is kindness in everything we think, say, want and do.” ~ Emanuel Swedenborg

 


Canyonbabe711
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 1451
   Posted 11/4/2006 9:27 PM (GMT -7)   
TSH can be really off and sometimes you really have to insist on the full thyroid test. That is a screening test. I know many people where it did not tell the story especially since some medications can affect it. I have had a TSh off the charts and then found the other ones normal. Have you had the entire blood workup or just those? Pottassium, red cell count, etc. The fact of the matter is that you are not OK. I am going thru something now that they cannot find a reason for and I know I am not OK because we have that sixth sense that we know something is not right. We just have to keep looking. Good luck. Get a full blood workup and next time you get the palpations go to urgent care or someplace where you can get checked out. It may be nothing but let them check it out. They can't do that on the phone and if it is not doing when you have the EKG it will not show up.

Post Edited (Canyonbabe711) : 11/4/2006 9:33:00 PM (GMT-7)


Jade25
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 79
   Posted 11/5/2006 8:16 AM (GMT -7)   
Ya... I told them that I wasn't having a palpitations attack at that moment, but explained that when I do my extremeties become extremely numb.

The doctor asked if I ever experienced tingling in my face, and I said yes, once in a while, but that it was not common. He then said it must be due to hyperventilation, which when I do have an attack I don't tend to do. :\ But, when the doctor makes up their mind, then that's it. I, of course, knew it was not diabetes but I am at a loss for why the TSH didn't show up. I don't think they did the full work up, and I don't intend to waste my time or theirs - the point is I at least tried to get help for it and should something actually ever happen now, they missed it.
Diagnosed with IBS in 2006
IBS symptoms since 1998
Chronic Back Injury since 2005
 

“Kindness is an inner desire that makes us want to do good things even if we do not get anything in return. It is the joy of our life to do them. When we do good things from this inner desire, there is kindness in everything we think, say, want and do.” ~ Emanuel Swedenborg

 


Keriamon
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 2976
   Posted 11/13/2006 1:34 PM (GMT -7)   
A woman posted on another list that I'm on, that she had had a thyroid specialist tell her that her thyroid wasn't low enough to bother treating--despite the fact that she was getting 10 hours of sleep at night and falling asleep at work during the day.  She saw a regular doctor and he said yes, she needed treatment; and since getting on it, she feels like a normal person again.
 
I wonder, what do they mean by "relatively normal"?  If you're actually normal, they should say so.  If you're not normal, then you're not normal.  There is no such thing as "almost normal"; that's called "not normal".  Do they really mean somewhat low, but they don't feel like treating it?  Could you be like this other woman who is really in need of treatment?
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