This is weird...numb tingling fingers caused by IBS

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MommyKimmie
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 45
   Posted 11/17/2006 11:30 PM (GMT -7)   
Well I woke up last night and my rt hand felt like it was asleep. And I woke up this morning and it felt the same, and it never went away. The surface of my thumb and some of my index finger is numb. I was thinking it was my carpel tunnel, since I had been having sharp twinges in my thumbs for a while. But then I called my dr to find out some test results and I asked her is the numbness had to do with any meds and she said that often people with digestive disorders lack B vitamins, and the lack of those can cause numbness. I had never heard of that. She told me to discuss it with my gastro at my appointment on tues. Weird.
Just thought I'd share.
-Kim (off to bed, got to get up early to shop til I drop!) tongue

pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20576
   Posted 11/18/2006 12:23 AM (GMT -7)   
Yup, it's true...I have crohns and IBS and before IBS was even an issue (as I've had crohns for 15 yrs now and only recently had IBS added to the list) I too suffered with what you're describing and sure enough my B12 levels were very low, the tingling/numbness is the onset of nerve damage caused by lack of Vit B (particularly 12 I guess) I had to get B12 shots and was then weaned onto B12 tabs 1200mcgs to be exact, once a day with my supper.

Most definitely get it looked after, if it goes too long it's irreversable nerve damage.

:)

Banje
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 11/20/2006 6:36 AM (GMT -7)   

Well thanks for sharing! I didnt know, I've been having thumb and little finger numbness for years and I never knew, I thought it was carpal for a while and went for test, nothing.. then I went to the chiro and he helped but still got numbness after a while.  I'm going to talk to my doctor about all this when I see her next. 


7Lil
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Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 3269
   Posted 11/20/2006 10:51 AM (GMT -7)   
I had the same symptoms, and because of them my doc thought I had IBD. Apparently B12 and Folic Acid are absorbed through the intestines, and since I was lacking both, it was suspected that mine were damaged. After being scoped the docs attributed my insufficient nutrition to IBS-D (as I did not have IBD). My transit time was much too quick to allow the proper absorbtion. For well over a year I've been on B12 and Folic Acid supplements, and my symptoms have not returned.
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CathyA
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Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 1431
   Posted 11/20/2006 2:45 PM (GMT -7)   
I didn't know this. Why the heck didn't my GI doc mention this? My docs never seem to believe in anything I bring up.
I do take sublingual B12, for leg buzzing I developed years ago. You can get them at the health store. I take about 1000 mcg of methylcobalamin.
I had some other weird neuro stuff, and my neurologist tested my ferritin levels. He said that just an iron level doesn't reflect things. He also said that he believes that what's considered the lower end of normal on the ferritin level is actually too low. I took some iron for awhile, and it helped.
It just really ticks me off that my GI doc never had much to say about anything. He didn't even mention calcium helping with diarrhea.
I'm glad there are places like this forum to learn things!
But....about your arm and hand.
My husband had that problem recently with his hand going numb, and it ended up being a pinched nerve in his upper spine. He did some neck stretching exercises and it helped. Maybe you could try those too. You just sit straight and turn your head as much as you can to the left, hold it for awhile, and then back to the front position. Do it to the right too.
His numbness in his fingers is taking forever to clear up. Good luck to you.

7Lil
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Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 3269
   Posted 11/20/2006 2:58 PM (GMT -7)   
Cathy,
There are a lot of things the docs don't tell us. I suspect either A) they don't know, or B) the answer is too easy so they won't be able to make money off us. NONE of my docs mentioned calcium or probiotics. In fact, my OB/GYN asked me what meds or vitamins I was on, and when I said "probiotics" he was like "what's that?" I was shocked! It just goes to show you that docs don't always know what is best.
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Sarita
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Date Joined Mar 2005
Total Posts : 2486
   Posted 11/20/2006 3:22 PM (GMT -7)   

I think it's usually more of a case that the docs were not taught any of these things in medical school, so they just don't know.  Most doctors are pretty ethical people, I think, and wouldn't withhold a beneficial treatment just because they don't make money off of it.  Nowadays, student doctors are being taught more about the alternative/complementary therapies out there, but we're still a few years from the point where these treatments will be instated on a more regular basis.  That's why patients have to do their research and bring back what they learned to their doctor.  But it's VERY important to tell your doctor what supplements you are on!  You don't want to be taking such high dosages of calcium, for instance, that you're going to develop hypercalcemia. 

Point being: do your research, be pro-active, but keep your doctor involved!  Docs don't know everything, but they have at least 12 years of post-high school education under their belts.  They've memorized thousands of drugs, drug side effects, drug interactions, etc.; if they are unfamiliar with something you are taking, take the opportunity to tell them what you've learned about it!


Keriamon
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 2976
   Posted 11/20/2006 4:47 PM (GMT -7)   
 
This is an article I posted about how doctors make assumptions about you from the minute they see you.  But, interestingly, the example the doctor cites is of a man who's come in for tingling hands.  The doctor gets him to breathe into a bag and the tingling stops.  Something about having poor respiration (due to stress and serious caffeine jitters) causes an acidity imbalance, which causes the tingling.  Since it's as simple as breathing into a bag, people with this problem might as well try it and see if it helps.

Canyonbabe711
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 1451
   Posted 11/21/2006 12:12 AM (GMT -7)   
The respiratory system can become impaired and cause all kinds of things from stress, infections, etc. My guess is that is what he was talking about. Sometimes people over breathe but sometimes people underbreathe. Acidosis is the problem which has nothing to do with acidity as we know it. If you are underbreathing you don't want to breath into a bag as you may be breathing back what you already have too much of. Most people that are in a panic situation over breathe. I really don't think this should be recommended except under a Drs. supervision. I was told one if I had done it I would have killed myself because I would have been inhaling the very thing that was causing my problem. Just a head's up on paperbag treatments.

Keriamon
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 2976
   Posted 11/21/2006 8:50 AM (GMT -7)   
I've always heard of making a person who's panicing/hyperventilating breathe into a bag, but I never knew why. I've never heard about underbreathing. What causes someone not to take in enough breath, other than a respriatory problem, like pnuemona?

crazygut
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2006
Total Posts : 41
   Posted 11/21/2006 1:39 PM (GMT -7)   
OH MY GOD!! The last 2 months I have waken up in the middle of the night with my right hand tingling (like it was asleep).  I have to make a fist & losen it a few times before the feeling goes away.  I thought it was poor circulation until my left hand started doing it too.  What a relief knowing others have very similiar situations!  It is quite annoying, so I am going to try the B vitamins and see if that helps.  Thank you so much for this thread! 

Canyonbabe711
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 1451
   Posted 11/21/2006 3:17 PM (GMT -7)   
Anything that compromises the lungs or depresses them. Sleeping med, anxiety meds anything that works on the central nervous system will slow breathing down especially during the night when our breathing is more shallow anyway. Anyone that experiences odd thing regarding breathing at night really needs to get it checked out cause it could be either too much or too little of one or the other. When you are out and around and suddenly have a panic attack chances are it is you are overbreathing and taking in too much oxygen and then the bag will help it balance out. It just should not be used imprudently. Flu, pneumonia, bronchitis or a history of sleep apnea also. Chances are it is fine but I did want to mention that it could be a dangerous problem for some people. There are people reading this that also have lung problems and they should definetly not do this under any circumstances.

Keriamon
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 2976
   Posted 11/21/2006 4:40 PM (GMT -7)   
Well, I certainly didn't know breathing in a bag could be dangerous. Sounded like a pretty harmless thing to try.

Canyonbabe711
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 1451
   Posted 11/21/2006 6:39 PM (GMT -7)   
Just remember you are not breathing in oxygen you are breathing in carbon dioxide which is the byproduct of oxygen. There in lies the problem. If you are hyperventilating from anxiety breathing fast and taking in too much oxygen like in a panic situation it would work. Otherwise no so best to just breathe more slowly, Breath in deeply for the count of 2 and purse those lips out slowly for count of 4 as the air goes out.
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