Stress and IBS

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

andwes
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 728
   Posted 2/13/2007 9:29 AM (GMT -7)   
I'm new here and haven't been formally diagnosed with IBS but certainly have all the symptoms.  Does it seem to you that stress contributes to attacks?  I got some very bad news last night and immediately my stomach under my rib cage cramped up like a vice. It's been up and down all last night and it's still sore today although not as acutely painful.  Now I'm afraid to eat anything for fear it will act up again because I can still feel the tenseness stemming from that bad news last night....and the butterflies in the stomach oftentimes end up being this 'cramping." I've always had anxiety/panic and hypochondria so this is just one issue of many.  I always thought IBS would affect your lower bowel but all my problems seem to center around my upper GI.

7Lil
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 3269
   Posted 2/13/2007 10:54 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi andwes,
Welcome to the IBS forum! :-)
Yes, most of us (if not all of us) feel stress contributes to IBS attacks. For many the stress of leaving the house and being away from a bathroom can kick start an attack. Stress causes an out pour of hormones which flood our body. Some people are more prone to upper GI problems, whereas others are prone to lower GI issues. I, unfortunately, get both. I get both nauseous and D. Sometimes I just get heartburn, other times it's just D. Whatever it is, stress definitely contributes. The best bet to combat it is to have some sort of stress management plan. Whether it be meditation or some type of exercise (Yoga, etc.). In the moment, the best thing is to do some deep breathing and maybe drink some calming tea. Green Tea is notorious for having calming effects. Theanine is an amino acid found in green tea that produces a calming effect on the brain. I also like Chamomile or any other tea claiming "calming" results.
When you eat, make sure to eat something light and fairly plain. Don't go crazy with grease or spicy. Mashed potatoes and baked chicken, or chicken soup are really calming on the gut (to most). Make sure not to stuff yourself either. Portion control is imperative for people with stomach issues.
I hope you feel better...


Co-Moderator for the IBS Forum
 
Please donate to help HealingWell continue to help us..... www.healingwell.com/donate


nst114
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 90
   Posted 2/14/2007 12:43 PM (GMT -7)   
I have to go to a therapist soon to see if there is some kind of stress or mental problem that is making my attacks happen
 


7Lil
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 3269
   Posted 2/14/2007 12:55 PM (GMT -7)   
Nst114, have you checked the Anxiety-Panic Disorder Forum? They might have some great tips for you. Just a thought...
Co-Moderator for the IBS Forum
 
Please donate to help HealingWell continue to help us..... www.healingwell.com/donate


nst114
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 90
   Posted 2/14/2007 2:38 PM (GMT -7)   

Justcantgo
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 2/16/2007 2:55 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi andwes, I too am new to this site and can't believe all the suggestions and advice I have found in just a few hours of reading and exploring.  Stress is definitely a factor for me but it is something that I didn't realize right away.  My doctor has suggested that I speak to a counselor before I go through anymore tests.  He thinks that speaking to someone might help to calm my nerves.  I also joined the gym recently and have found that has helped. 7Lil's suggestion of green tea is good too.  I wish you luck with whatever it is that you are going through right now.

TexasJen
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 649
   Posted 2/16/2007 5:14 PM (GMT -7)   
Counseling isn't a bad move at all. There IS a mind-body connection, and while counseling probably won't "cure" what ails you, it just might make things better as far as coping with your symptoms is concerned. I was very pleasantly surprised myself when I started seeing a pain psychologist. Sometimes, they can help you identify what triggers your symptoms so that you can avoid those things. They can also help with relaxation and self-hypnosis techniques to get you through the worst days when no medicine will help. Mental therapy has it's place in treating any chronic illness.
Living in the Republic of Texas minus a gallbladder, appendix, uterus, and 18" of colon; but living with my wonderful husband, 2 dogs, 1 cockatiel, and 2 gold fish. 

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Tuesday, December 06, 2016 1:05 PM (GMT -7)
There are a total of 2,733,637 posts in 301,139 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 151273 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, minniemighty.
387 Guest(s), 8 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
alephnull, Jen77, waterbee, Serenity Now, Girlie, minniemighty, Mad Martha, DJB387


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2016 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer