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+Lyme
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Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 1295
   Posted 5/14/2010 11:06 PM (GMT -6)   
My visits here have been few and far between and I haven't been able to read every post, just as many as I can.  I just read a couple of posts referring to vitamin D and wanted to add something --- if it's already been discussed here, sorry, just disregard.
 
Just recently, I have run into several people whose 'regular' Drs have prescribed 50,000 units of Vite D per week. (all at once) This dose also matches the dose I hear about on talk radio 'informercials' by a major supplement company, whose name escapes me.  Now, it is really interesting that regular Drs have now gotten into testing folks' vite D levels and prescribing it. My mother is one.
 
My father is 81 and about a year ago he fell and injured his shoulder. The Dr found an injured rotator cuff (sp?) and said that there was nothing that could be done about it.  He had some physical therapy for awhile, but it only hurt and he never felt any improvement. ** He is NOT a chronic complainer, but he suffered quite a bit of constant pain from it.
 
Anyway, awhile back I started taking D3 supps -- 300-400 units per day. After hearing the infomercials on the radio, I upped to 1000 units per day and soon increased to 2000 per day.  And I convinced my Dad to take at least 2000 units per day. He continued this for quite a few months and the past 3 weeks he finally said that his shoulder felt MUCH better and he had very little pain!  I really believe it is the Vite D3.  I'm pushing him to get the 5000 unit gels and he said that he would. It's pretty wild that all of a sudden physicians are paying attention to this!
 
And altho I don't know what or if 5000 units per day are doing for me, I'm gonna do it the rest of my life, because supposedly there are 26 organs that will benefit, the immune systems should benefit, along w/ bones & joints, the brain, prevention of many types of cancer, etc.  In fact, I may up my dose to the recommended 50,000 units per week.
 
I am clearly not cured, but I honestly believe that everyone here should get onto 2000-5000 units of D3 per day, if not more.  And it is recommended to take it w/ Omega 3 fish oils.
 
CAN'T HURT!! 
Bit 1972: Acute and chronic tonsillitis, UTI, miscarraige, appendicitis, hypoglycemia,  chronic neck pain w/ crushed vertibrae, chronic severe back pain, mitral valve prolapse, depression, resolution?
 
Bit Mother's Day 2007: Lyme, Babesia microti, hypothyroidism, EBV, HHV6, Parvovirus B19, low adrenals &misc other hormones, depression, anxiety, more of the above.


CajunGrl
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Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 4717
   Posted 5/14/2010 11:18 PM (GMT -6)   
Hey Lyme,

Many people are low in Vitamin D and I am one of them. I have a prescription for 50,000IU a week. Just so you know, you should get your levels checked first before you start taking high doses on your own. 50,000IU a week is a very high dose and only prescribed to those who are severely low. Actually, I would get my levels checked before I started an Vitamin D.

Btw, I'm glad your father is finally getting some relief. It looks like maybe he did need the Vitamin D.
**You never know how STRONG you are....until being STRONG is the ONLY choice you have**

lymediseasethroughmyeyes.blogspot.com/

Co-Moderator Lyme Disease Forum


springsjean
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 2050
   Posted 5/15/2010 7:44 AM (GMT -6)   
OK but how do you tolerate it. I tried upping my dose and it did not agree with me. Any suggestions?

bucci
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Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 1489
   Posted 5/15/2010 10:03 AM (GMT -6)   
I live in southeren ARIZONA and the local doctor here has a lot of people on vitamin D.. So it not just a lyme thing. The question is "why?" are so many people low on vitamin D. Isn't that what you get from the sun??
hep c , lyme
Dad has lyme


Deejavu
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2005
Total Posts : 3809
   Posted 5/15/2010 10:12 AM (GMT -6)   
I take liquid Vitamin D that I buy from Costco..  I take it because I don't want to be out in the sun because the sun is very dangerous and my baby brother passed away from melanoma skin cancer all because he got too much sun one day..    The rate of skin cancer is higher than ever..  So please be careful when you go out and wear a strong sunscreen..
 
Denise
It's all about the Immune System mixed with a large dose of Positive Thinking and Detoxing Daily!
 
This song is about my years with chronic lyme since 1995 and being in remission for over 4 years:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ds81S61UvPA
 


+Lyme
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 1295
   Posted 5/15/2010 10:28 AM (GMT -6)   
I have been hearing and reading that most Americans are Vite D deficient. Our bodies manufacture Vite D from the sun. And we are outdoors so much less than most people used to be and we just plain don't get enough sun. One program I heard said that in the summer, w/ a 20 min sunbath -- 10 min on each side, the body would produce 2500-5000 units of D.

Mothers used to give their babies sunbaths (for the D), and kids used to be outside for hours daily, and it doesn't help that we live so far from the equator. Also, I guess that too much over processed food and all that entails destroys many of our natural vites.

That's about all I know. I don't know how one's levels must be before a Dr prescribes D.

And bucci, not sure why so many people in AZ are deficient, but it may still apply that people there aren't getting enough sun -- getting any sunlight on our skin has been taboo for quite awhile now.

I used to sunbathe a LOT. Too much. But I used to feel better when I was tan, tho. It seemed that the sun and the pool would energize me when I had to work nites. Tanning beds helped too. Maybe that's why I got sick? I had stopped tanning the spring of that tick bite. Just stuff to think about.....
Bit 1972: Acute and chronic tonsillitis, UTI, miscarraige, appendicitis, hypoglycemia,  chronic neck pain w/ crushed vertibrae, chronic severe back pain, mitral valve prolapse, depression, resolution?
 
Bit Mother's Day 2007: Lyme, Babesia microti, hypothyroidism, EBV, HHV6, Parvovirus B19, low adrenals &misc other hormones, depression, anxiety, more of the above.


+Lyme
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 1295
   Posted 5/15/2010 10:37 AM (GMT -6)   
springsjean, I'm sorry, I have not heard of anyone having a problem tolerating it -- maybe you aren't deficient and it's harmful fo ryou?
Bit 1972: Acute and chronic tonsillitis, UTI, miscarraige, appendicitis, hypoglycemia,  chronic neck pain w/ crushed vertibrae, chronic severe back pain, mitral valve prolapse, depression, resolution?
 
Bit Mother's Day 2007: Lyme, Babesia microti, hypothyroidism, EBV, HHV6, Parvovirus B19, low adrenals &misc other hormones, depression, anxiety, more of the above.


GWB
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2005
Total Posts : 571
   Posted 5/15/2010 12:37 PM (GMT -6)   
This is a MUST read article (long one but worth it) about the importance of vitamin D

www.westonaprice.org/The-Miracle-of-Vitamin-D.html

If you get tested for this there's a specific test you need to get for this otherwise you won't really know if you are lacking in this very important vitamin. I'm very low in D and taking D3 supplements are helping me tremendously.

D3 is the vitamin that most of us with Lyme disease need to be taking. A large percentage of lymies are deficient in vitamin D for a lot of reasons that I don't have time to share right now as I'm taking off to meet someone. Also, if someone knows the test I'm talking about please post it here as I gotta run. Otherwise I'll post it later when I'm back online.

Here's what I take and it comes highly recommended by most LLMD's and LLND's.

www.vitacost.com/Carlson-Vitamin-D-Drops

Click the reviews button and see the positive comments about this.

Gary

Razzle
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 4130
   Posted 5/15/2010 1:31 PM (GMT -6)   
I also am very low on Vitamin D but I cannot sleep at all when I take supplements. I don't know why...maybe it goes after the Lyme and it is a herx?

Also, when doctors prescribe 50,000 IU Vitamin D, it is usually in the Vitamin D2 form (ergocalciferol) and not the D3 form (cholecalciferol). My understanding is that the D2 form has to be converted by the body somehow into a useable form first, which means one has to take more of it to get the same impact as taking the D3 form.

Also, I believe suncreen is the #1 reason that people are low in Vitamin D even if they spend a lot of time outdoors...and those who live too far North cannot get enough Vitamin D even in Summer due to the low sun angle.

My Husband's Endocrinologist says the body uses 4-6000 IU/day Vitamin D, so it makes sense to supplement with at least 2000IU and maybe more if one is deficient. I agree taking it with Omega-3 EFA's is a good idea too because Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin, and will absorb much better if taken with fat.

Take care,
-Razzle
Chronic Lyme Disease, Chronic Bartonella (clinical dx only), Gluten & Sulfite Sensitivity, Many Food/Inhalant/Medication/Chemical Allergies & Intolerances, Asthma, Gut issues (dysmotility, non-specific inflammation), UCTD ("Secondary Lupus-Like Syndrome"), Osteoporosis, chronic Lymphopenia, etc.; G-Tube; Currently weaning off TPN.
Meds:  Pulmicort, IV Doxycycline, Heparin (to flush PICC line), Claritin, Singulair, Domperidone, Colloidal Silver (topically & nasally), probiotics, Liver support herbs, Ailanthus, digestive enzymes, homeopathy.


CajunGrl
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 4717
   Posted 5/15/2010 6:02 PM (GMT -6)   
The test to check you Vitamin D levels is called 25-hydroxy-vitamin D and 1,25 dihydroxy-vitamin D. It is my understanding that both of these need to be checked.

My endocronologist wants me to take 2000IU a day after my levels are normal.
**You never know how STRONG you are....until being STRONG is the ONLY choice you have**

lymediseasethroughmyeyes.blogspot.com/

Co-Moderator Lyme Disease Forum


GWB
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2005
Total Posts : 571
   Posted 5/15/2010 7:55 PM (GMT -6)   
CajunGrl said, "The test to check you Vitamin D levels is called 25-hydroxy-vitamin D and 1,25 dihydroxy-vitamin D. It is my understanding that both of these need to be checked". Yes! That is the test you want to get to see if you are vitamin D deficient. Thank you for posting that!

Razzle, actually, vitamin D3 is known to be more effective than D2. The fact that doctors may prescribe D2 doesn't really validate the fact that D2 is better for you. If you read about Lyme disease (or any chronic disease) and which of the two vitamins D's are recommended, vitamin D3 will almost always be the D vitamin of choice by LLMD's and LLND's.

If you want to read the scientific evidence behind this, there is good study that was done comparing Vitamins D3 and D2. It's long and boring to those of us who are "scientifically challenged", not to mention, it's a lot of reading which isn't easy for some of us lymies who have problems concentrating. But in a nutshell, here is what it says without reading the whole article which I will post a link to:

"To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing vitamins D3 and D2 by mapping the time course of serum 25OHD after a single dose. We showed that vitamin D3 raises and maintains 25OHD levels to a substantially greater degree than does vitamin D2, with a differential potency of at least 3-fold, and more likely closer to 10-fold."

Source to the full study here: jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/full/89/11/5387

Here's another article that supports vitamin D3 over D2 and explains why:

--Vitamin D2 and/or Vitamin D3

There are two types of vitamin D supplements available for over-the-counter purchase (vitamin D2 and vitamin D3).

Vitamin D3 is the type that most experts believe should be utilized in clinical practice (Wolpowitz & Gilchrest, 2006).

Vitamin D2 is also known as "ergocalciferol," and vitamin D3 is also known as "cholecalciferol." This is important for patients who have purchased a dietary supplement that does not indicate the specific type of vitamin D in the product by number but have listed the scientific name.

Most experts now believe that the only form that should be purchased is vitamin D3. Vitamin D2 is also very acceptable, but in the author’s opinion, most individuals should switch to D3. There is a plethora of logical reasons for advocating the use of vitamin D3 over vitamin D2 dietary supplements (Wolpowitz, & Gilchrest, 2006), including:

UVB light from the sun strikes the skin, and humans synthesize vitamin D3, so it is the most "natural" form.

Human beings do not make vitamin D2, and most healthy fish contain vitamin D3.

Vitamin D3 is the same price as vitamin D2.

Vitamin D3 may be less toxic than D2 because higher concentrations of D2 circulate in the blood when consumed (compared to vitamin D3). It does not bind as well to the receptors in the human tissues compared to vitamin D3.

Vitamin D3 is the more potent form of vitamin D, which is a potential benefit. For example, obesity tends to lower blood levels of vitamin D, so a more potent form is needed.

Vitamin D3 is more stable on the shelf compared to D2, and is more likely to remain active for a longer period of time and when exposed to different conditions (temperature, humidity, and storage). This is perhaps why the amount of vitamin D2 in certain fortified food products have been significantly lower than that advertised on the label in numerous instances.

Vitamin D3 has been the most utilized form of vitamin D in clinical trials, and there have only been a few clinical trials of vitamin D2 to prevent bone fractures in adults.

Vitamin D3 is more effective at raising and maintaining the vitamin D blood test (again, D2 binds less tightly to the vitamin D receptors in the body; therefore, D2 does not circulate as long in the body, which means it has a shorter half-life).

Vitamin D2 is a fungus/yeast-derived product, and it was first produced in the early 1920s by exposing foods to ultraviolet light (Wolpowitz & Gilchrest, 2006). This process was patented and licensed to pharmaceutical companies.

Currently, many major prescription forms of vitamin D are actually vitamin D2 and not vitamin D3. Vitamin

D2 is synthetically made from radiating a compound (ergosterol) from the mold ergot.

Vitamin D3 is made commercially and synthetically in a similar way that it is produced intrinsically in human and animal skin when exposed to UVB light. Wool sources of 7-dehydrocholesterol are used (from cholesterol), and irradiatied to form active vitamin D3. Vegetarians or especially vegans may be opposed to the use of vitamin D3 supplementation because it is derived from an animal source, and these individuals should be guided to the vitamin D2 form. Multivitamins have either vitamin D2 or D3, but many companies are now utilizing mostly vitamin D3. Cod liver oil has vitamin D3 in it.

Rickets, a defect in bone growth in infancy and childhood, was first identified in 1650 (Welch, Bergstrom, & Tsang, 2000). It was not until 1922 that medical research demonstrated that something in cod liver oil prevented and cured rickets.

Additionally, vitamin D2 added to milk in the United States and Europe in the 1930s essentially eliminated rickets (disease of weak bones in children) or osteomalacia (same disease of weak bones but in adults). Currently, fortification with vitamin D2 or D3 has continued to keep rickets scarce in North America. The minimum amount of vitamin D needed to prevent rickets is 100 IU (2.5 mcg) per day in infants with little to no sun exposure.--

Source of this article above: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/589256_4

While taking vitamin D2 can be helpful, it's much better to take D3 for all of the reasons stated above. I do agree that you should be tested by a doctor to determine if you are deficient in vitamin D, but I believe getting vitamin D3 drops are far more beneficial and effective than vitamin D2. If you do a google search I believe the evidence supports this.

By the way, speaking of vitamins, Dr. S who wrote the book, "The Lyme Disease Solution" has a list of supplements (D3 included) that he believes all Lyme patients should be taking. I think he's pretty much spot on. I take all of the supplements he has on his list for Lyme patients except for vitamin A. Maybe that's something I might add to my daily supplement intake. Anyone have comments on this?

Source: www.lymebook.com/lyme-disease-diet-and-supplements-vitamin-a-b-c-magnesium

Gary

Post Edited (GWB) : 5/15/2010 6:58:32 PM (GMT-6)


Razzle
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 4130
   Posted 5/15/2010 9:14 PM (GMT -6)   
Gary,

Yes, I totally agree with you that D3 is the superior form of Vitamin D to use. I was just explaining that when a doctor prescribes 50,000IU, it is usually the D2 form. Not saying it is better... Sorry if I was unclear...

Take care,
-Razzle
Chronic Lyme Disease, Chronic Bartonella (clinical dx only), Gluten & Sulfite Sensitivity, Many Food/Inhalant/Medication/Chemical Allergies & Intolerances, Asthma, Gut issues (dysmotility, non-specific inflammation), UCTD ("Secondary Lupus-Like Syndrome"), Osteoporosis, chronic Lymphopenia, etc.; G-Tube; Currently weaning off TPN.
Meds:  Pulmicort, IV Doxycycline, Heparin (to flush PICC line), Claritin, Singulair, Domperidone, Colloidal Silver (topically & nasally), probiotics, Liver support herbs, Ailanthus, digestive enzymes, homeopathy.


GWB
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2005
Total Posts : 571
   Posted 5/15/2010 9:44 PM (GMT -6)   
Razzle, actually you were clear in explaining it. I went back and reread what you wrote and now I see I didn't read closely enough what you were saying and misunderstood you. Sorry bout that! :-)

What I posted is good information for those who may not know the difference between the two. Vitamin D is a very important vitamin, especially for those of us who suffer with chronic diseases.

Gary

Razzle
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 4130
   Posted 5/15/2010 10:06 PM (GMT -6)   
No problem - I appreciate all the info on Vitamin D...it is excellent.

So if a person is allergic to sheep lanolin and/or wool, could they possibly react negatively to Vitamin D3 in supplement form if it is from wool?
-Razzle
Chronic Lyme Disease, Chronic Bartonella (clinical dx only), Gluten & Sulfite Sensitivity, Many Food/Inhalant/Medication/Chemical Allergies & Intolerances, Asthma, Gut issues (dysmotility, non-specific inflammation), UCTD ("Secondary Lupus-Like Syndrome"), Osteoporosis, chronic Lymphopenia, etc.; G-Tube; Currently weaning off TPN.
Meds:  Pulmicort, IV Doxycycline, Heparin (to flush PICC line), Claritin, Singulair, Domperidone, Colloidal Silver (topically & nasally), probiotics, Liver support herbs, Ailanthus, digestive enzymes, homeopathy.


GWB
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2005
Total Posts : 571
   Posted 5/15/2010 11:16 PM (GMT -6)   
Razzle, if a person is allergic to lanolin then D3 obviously isn't the answer for them. It's very possible they would have an allergic reaction to it, but some people who take D3, who are allergic to lanolin, seem to do alright with it. Seems best not to take the risk if a person knows they're allergic to it, I would think.

Some people who are vegans won't take D3 because it comes from an animal source. People like this have two options, they would have to take vitamin D2 (plant source), or as Dr. Mercola suggests, get a tanning bed. cool

http://tanningbeds.mercola.com/tanning-beds/standup-tanning-systems.aspx/?aid=CD411

Gary

Razzle
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Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 4130
   Posted 5/16/2010 2:44 PM (GMT -6)   
Or they could take the fish oil version if not allergic to fish. I haven't been brave enough to try fish oil...allergic to fish. Lanolin and wool both make me break out in a rash. I have tried the D2 supplements but they did nothing to change my low vitamin D blood levels. I guess the tanning bed is my best option (or vacationing in Hawaii ;) )...

Thanks for all the info. Take care,
-Razzle
Chronic Lyme Disease, Chronic Bartonella (clinical dx only), Gluten & Sulfite Sensitivity, Many Food/Inhalant/Medication/Chemical Allergies & Intolerances, Asthma, Gut issues (dysmotility, non-specific inflammation), UCTD ("Secondary Lupus-Like Syndrome"), Osteoporosis, chronic Lymphopenia, etc.; G-Tube; Currently weaning off TPN.
Meds:  Pulmicort, IV Doxycycline, Heparin (to flush PICC line), Claritin, Singulair, Domperidone, Colloidal Silver (topically & nasally), probiotics, Liver support herbs, Ailanthus, digestive enzymes, homeopathy.


Kodak
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2010
Total Posts : 74
   Posted 5/20/2010 11:04 AM (GMT -6)   
I'm taking 20,000 iu per day of liquid D3 in olive oil base. (10 drops at 2000 per drop)
Does that sound like too much? My D level was low at only 27.

GWB
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2005
Total Posts : 571
   Posted 5/20/2010 11:26 AM (GMT -6)   
Kodak,

The most I've ever heard of people taking is 50,000 IU a *week*, unless your doctor instructs you otherwise. Personally, it does seem a bit high for a daily dose. Did your doctor recommend this amount? Too much Vitamin D can be toxic. I get my D levels checked every three months to be on the safe side.

Gary

Kodak
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2010
Total Posts : 74
   Posted 5/21/2010 12:35 PM (GMT -6)   
Gary,
Yes my doctor requested that I take that much since my levels were so low
What would be the side effects of too much vit D?

GWB
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2005
Total Posts : 571
   Posted 5/21/2010 2:11 PM (GMT -6)   
Kodak,

To answer your question "What would be the side effects of too much vit D?" Here's some information that I think answers your question:

*Symptoms of Too Much Vitamin D*

Excessive dosages of Vitamin D can cause nausea, vomiting, constipation, weakness, a decline in appetite and weight loss, anorexia, bone pain and headaches. Since Vitamin D aids in the absorption of calcium, getting too much of it can cause increased blood levels of calcium, a condition known as hypercalcaemai. Over time, this can lead to hypertension and heart and kidney damage. This condition can cause calcium and phosphate deposits in soft tissues, including kidneys. Of normal adults who get an excessive dose of 100,000 IU a day for several weeks or months, researchers conclude 20 percent will develop hypercalcemia.


Source: www.livestrong.com/article/29629-vitamin-d-toxic-effects/

As you can see it would take excessive amounts of vitamin D before it reached toxic levels. The fact that your doctor prescribed you that much vitamin D must mean you are seriously low. Opinions vary on how much is too much. That's why it's important to get your D levels checked every three months (or as often as your doctor suggests). Under your doctor's supervision, you should be fine, as I'm sure he'll keep a watchful eye on your D levels.

One other thing to be cautious about and that would be anything that you might be taking that could possibly interact with Vitamin D. Here's a list of medications that could possibly interact with vitamin D:

www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-929-VITAMIN+D.aspx?activeIngredientId=929&activeIngredientName=VITAMIN+D (Click the interaction tab to see the list.)

Gary

CajunGrl
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Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 4717
   Posted 5/21/2010 6:43 PM (GMT -6)   
Kodak,

That does sound like alot of vitamin D. Did your doctor prescribe that amount? Like Gary said, the highest dose is "usually" 50,000IU a week. I've seen someone taking more, but only under their doctor's guidance.
Lyme disease, Fibromyalgia, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, Adrenal Fatigue
Prescription Meds: Savella, Tramadol, Hydrocortisone
Supplements: Thyro-complex, Magnesium, Calcium, Potassium, Folic Acid, Fish Oil, Vitamin C, Probiotics, GI Repair and Joint Supplement

Co-Moderator Lyme Disease Forum


allieann
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2010
Total Posts : 115
   Posted 5/22/2010 1:17 AM (GMT -6)   
CAUTION for lyme disease patients and Vitamin D. mad
 

Marshall Protocol principles

Vitamin D dysregulation

Also known as calciferol, Vitamin D was misnamed as a vitamin after its discovery in 1922.  A vitamin is a type of organic substance that is required in the diet and essential to nutrition and metabolism.  Vitamin D is unique because it is not required in the diet; instead, it is manufactured by the body via exposure to sunlight or artificial lights. Although we do consume Vitamin D in our diets, it is not technically a vitamin since it is not required in the diet.

For the purpose of explaining the Marshall Protocol, we are less concerned about the technical definition of Vitamin D and more concerned about how it affects chronic disease.  Whether a true vitamin or not, Vitamin D plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Lyme Disease and other illnesses involving infection with cell-wall-deficient bacteria. At the center of the Marshall Protocol is the breakthrough discovery that Vitamin D is not handled correctly in the bodies of people infected with cell-wall-deficient bacteria. Let’s look at how this dysregulated handling of Vitamin D occurs.

As we mentioned, Vitamin D can enter the body in two ways: it is either synthesized in the skin after exposure to sunlight or artificial lights, or it is consumed in the diet. Once Vitamin D is inside the body, not all of it remains in static form. A small portion of Vitamin D is converted to a type of secosteroid known as 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin-D (abbreviated “1,25-D”).  A hormone required for regular body function, 1,25-D is manufactured by the kidneys as a metabolite (or product) of Vitamin D. In healthy people, the body tightly regulates how much 1,25-D is made in the kidneys; although critical to health, too much 1,25-D can be very harmful. If present in excessive quantities, 1,25-D can be immunosuppressive and cause a plethora of physical and psychological symptoms.

In people infected with cell-wall-deficient bacteria, the production of 1,25-D can spiral out of control and rapidly reach damaging levels.  This happens because, as an evolved survival mechanism, cell-wall-deficient bacteria are capable of catalyzing the process by which Vitamin D is converted to 1,25-D.  Instead of a slow, controlled conversion which occurs only in the kidneys, 1,25-D production becomes uncontrolled, occurring throughout the body inside cells infected with cell-wall-deficient bacteria. Specifically, immune system cells harboring cell-wall-deficient bacteria can turn into tiny, unrestrained factories producing excessive amounts of 1,25-D. Bacteria catalyze the 1,25-D conversion process intentionally to cause immune system suppression and create a more favorable living environment in the body.  

The result of catalyzed 1,25-D production is a subclinical yet devastating immunosuppression syndrome that allows Lyme Disease (and other types of cell-wall-deficient) bacteria to persist chronically in the body.  When present in appropriately controlled quantities, 1,25-D is a critical nutrient and is important to health, as we have said.  However, when present in excessive quantities, 1,25-D is immunosuppressive and inhibits the immune system from fighting infections. This process is one of the core survival mechanisms of Borrelia Burgdorferi.  The excessive levels of 1,25-D often present in people harboring chronic infections leads to a greatly inhibited host defense system. By accelerating conversion of Vitamin D to 1,25-D, these tiny bacteria are basically able to neutralize the human immune system.  

Additionally, as we have alluded to, elevated levels of 1,25-D itself (even without infections on board) can cause a plethora of disease symptoms.  So, an elevated level of 1,25-D has a two-fold impact: it suppresses the immune system and also creates numerous other symptoms of malaise. This is why it is so important to address elevated 1,25-D levels when treating Lyme Disease.

The aforementioned principles are at the core of the Marshall Protocol.  One of the primary objectives of the Marshall Protocol is to reduce the excessive levels of 1,25-D in the body.  Since 1,25-D is a metabolite of (or product of) Vitamin D, the process of reducing 1,25-D levels in the body requires that a person suffering from infection with cell-wall-deficient bacteria decrease their consumption of Vitamin D foods and supplements, and also reduce their exposure to sunlight and bright lights. Both of these actions are primary components of the Marshall Protocol that will be examined in a few pages. By curtailing the amount of Vitamin D that enters the body, 1,25-D production is also reduced, bringing the immune system back into balance. While Vitamin D consumption (and exposure to sunlight and other artificial lights) may be neutral or even beneficial to healthy people, it can be poison to people infected with cell-wall-deficient bacteria because of this pathogenic process.

In addition to Dr. Marshall, Dr. James Schaller has also found that 1,25-D is involved in other inflammatory processes. Specifically, 1,25-D levels have been found to be higher in inflamed, damaged, and arthritic joints in comparison with healthy joints. This observation further confirms the principles on which the Marshall Protocol is based.  

VIEW IMAGE


Razzle
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 4130
   Posted 5/22/2010 3:01 AM (GMT -6)   
So one should have both the 25 and the 1,25 Vitamin D level checked first before supplementing with Vitamin D.
-Razzle
Chronic Lyme Disease, Chronic Bartonella (clinical dx only), Gluten & Sulfite Sensitivity, Many Food/Inhalant/Medication/Chemical Allergies & Intolerances, Asthma, Gut issues (dysmotility, non-specific inflammation), UCTD ("Secondary Lupus-Like Syndrome"), Osteoporosis, chronic Lymphopenia, etc.; G-Tube; Currently on TPN due to bowel obstruction.
Meds:  IV Doxycycline - changing to IV Cipro next week, Heparin (to flush PICC line), Claritin, Singulair, Domperidone, Colloidal Silver (topically & nasally), probiotics, Milk Thistle, Magnesium, homeopathy.


Kodak
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2010
Total Posts : 74
   Posted 5/22/2010 11:36 AM (GMT -6)   
THank you all for your input and information. It was very helpful.

The receprionist at my docs office told me My doc may have me on a loading dose for the first few weeks then taper off or discontinue.

But for now, I think I'll just lower that dose until I speak to her myself.

Thanks again. :)

+Lyme
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 1295
   Posted 5/22/2010 12:22 PM (GMT -6)   
Regarding the Vite A question: I USED (keyword) to study the vitamins a lot -- oh, about 30 yrs ago when I worked for the original MOther Earth News. Don't take this as gospel, but here is what I remember about A.

Too much Vite A is toxic/harmful. I don't know/remember what dosages were considered safe. However, you can take all the beta carotene you want-- it is not stored in the body. I used to be able to eat raw carrots til my palms were orange. (supposed to help prevent cancer). Now, I hardly eat carrots, but take 3 betacarotenes per day.

I believe that if I'm taking too much, my body won't save or store it.

I stand to be corrected on this -- it's a supplement I have taken for years, but did not continue to research.
Bit 1972: Acute and chronic tonsillitis, UTI, miscarraige, appendicitis, hypoglycemia,  chronic neck pain w/ crushed vertibrae, chronic severe back pain, mitral valve prolapse, depression, resolution?
 
Bit Mother's Day 2007: Lyme, Babesia microti, hypothyroidism, EBV, HHV6, Parvovirus B19, low adrenals &misc other hormones, depression, anxiety, more of the above.

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