Different types of migraines/headaches?!

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tysmyboo
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Date Joined Dec 2004
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   Posted 5/30/2009 2:15 AM (GMT -6)   
Did you know there are many different types or classifications of migraines?
 
Some of them are:

Migraine without Aura-This would be a classic migraine or migraine without "aura" symptoms (generally visual, but can also be sensory or motor disturbances)

Migraine with Aura- Classified with visual symptoms, blind spots, hallucinations, smelling odors that aren't there, change in taste and feeling.-sometimes numbness.  Loss of words or inability to speak properly

Hemiplegic Migraine- Rare, generally a family history. MOTOR paralysis, sensory disturbances. "pins and needles"

Ophthalmoplegic Migraine- generally pain near/around/behind the eye

Retinal Migraine-generally classified with loss of vision, then dull headache behind the eye

Basilar Artery Migraine-very rare form, clasified by pain in the back of the head, ringing in the ears, nausea/vomiting, dizziness, confusion or lack of balance and is strongly related to hormonal influences which primarily strikes young adult women/adolescent girls

Abdominal Migraine-mostly in children, generally 5-9 years old, pain in the abdomen also with nausea and vomiting

Figuring out which type is difficult at times as they can be very similar, however, it is necessary so the best course of treatment can be followed.

Take note of what your headache feels like and what area of the head hurts. Try to use words like "sharp, stabbing, dull, aching, drilling, poking, shooting, pulsating, gnawing,  burning, intense, nagging" these will help your physician understand what it feels like.

Keeping a food diary is a great way to see if there are patterns affecting your head pain. (this is also good for emotional state, sleep patterns, chemically induced head pain etc)

There are many things to consider...I hope this has helped some!


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DadofPainboy
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Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 45
   Posted 5/30/2009 7:10 PM (GMT -6)   
And there are lots of things which look like migraine and are not.

If you are a parent and you see a kid vomiting and having unexplained serious abdominal pain that doesn't look like an infection -- if the doctors tell you 'this is theater' ask about abdominal migraine. It would have saved us years of doubting a kid in pain. (These often go on to have more typical migraines later in adolescence -- buckle your seatbelt...)

tysmyboo
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Date Joined Dec 2004
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   Posted 5/30/2009 10:12 PM (GMT -6)   

exactly!!!

If you feel like what your doctor is saying is not "fitting" what you are feeling, feel free to get a second or even third opinion.

Great point :-)


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Annuk
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   Posted 6/1/2009 4:55 AM (GMT -6)   
tysmyboo said...
exactly!!!

If you feel like what your doctor is saying is not "fitting" what you are feeling, feel free to get a second or even third opinion.

Great point [img]/community/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]




I second that!!! yeah Sadly Docs are not very good at listening to what is actually happening they only seem to hear what they 'perceive' is happening!!!!
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DadofPainboy
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Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 45
   Posted 6/1/2009 11:27 AM (GMT -6)   
Remember that doctors are closer to scientists than they are to psychologists.  They are not mind readers and if you are less than clear about what's going on and when it happened they have no choice but to try to work with the unclarity or uncertainty.
 
There are no electronic or biological tests for many sorts of pain.  If you are unclear about the changing nature, timing and extent of your pain you are going to get care that is less good than you might be getting from any doctor.   This isn't about your fault or their fault, it's like the weather so you just have to work with it.
 
Migraines are a fearsome illness since the first thing to go out the window when you are in pain is attention to detail and accuracy -- but that's exactly what the doctors need to help the most.
 
So:  Keep a diary on a calendar.   Set it up so you can make shorthand notes '5x23' means --> same as May 23'.  Write the details only when there isn't a good match to another day.  Even if the doctors don't read it, you will be able to be alot more clear when you have your chance to explain it.
 
Does the pain alter with your heartbeat?   Does it change if the area is massaged?  Improved by cold?  warmth?   Food likes/dislikes prior/after?  Mood/Energy changes prior after?     What is the shape of the painful region?  Same level of pain over the whole painful region or more concentrated in one spot and easing off as you move away from that spot?   Does chewing change it?  Vision affected?  Numbness/other senses affected?   
 
What really helps is to see what changes medications bring.  I've learned that really fine-tuning the doses of various medications and even lower doses of medications in combination can do more than they did at larger doses or alone in the past.  
 
Anyhow, details matter and you'll do better if you work at really being accurate about them.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

korbnep
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Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 327
   Posted 6/1/2009 12:42 PM (GMT -6)   
This is a little technical but the International Headache Society has created a web based edition of their classification guide. I've used the classification information a lot in the past to learn about less common types of headache disorders:

The International Headache Classification (ICHD-2)
DX: NDPH, Recovered CRPS
RX: Lamictal, Methylphenidate, Clonazepam, Wellbutrin XL, Namenda, Oxycontin, Oxycodone, Magnesium sup.
PRN: Ketamine nasal spray, Celebrex, Migranal, Haloperidol, Zyprexa, Lodine, Zofran, Phenergan, Thorazine, DHE IM, Droperidol IM, Toradol, Reglan, Ambien CR, Provigil, and all triptans


tysmyboo
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Date Joined Dec 2004
Total Posts : 921
   Posted 6/4/2009 11:00 PM (GMT -6)   

Thanks Ben!

I use this often, I was trying to break things down a little for "beginners" (if I can say that without it coming off wrong) so that they can see that what their doctors may call "migraines" could be a variation and give ideas of things they can look up.

I appreciate the link tongue


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