Treatment for New Daily Persistent Headache

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kandjmomy
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 40
   Posted 7/14/2009 10:46 AM (GMT -6)   
I've had a headache for 4 months and feel like I've been through hell and back with tests and treatments. After ruling out other diagnoses, my headache doc thinks it's New Daily Persistent Headache. I understand that it's one of the most difficult headaches to treat, so I'm wondering if anything has worked for others? I've been on countless meds and am now going to try beta-blockers. Doc said admission with IV Lidocaine may be my last hope after we've exhausted everything else. I'm not ready for that yet.

Can you tell me what you've tried for this diagnosis and what has worked?

Thanks, Amanda

tysmyboo
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2004
Total Posts : 921
   Posted 7/14/2009 9:41 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Amanda!
You may want to try the IV Lidocaine, one of my best girlfriends has been doing that for her NDPH and has had great results. What other types of things have you tried so far?!

(I will see if I can have my friend stop by and post a message)
Sara-Migraine/Headache Forum Moderator
Battling headpain for 17 years.
DX: occipital neuralgia-radiofrequency nerve ablation every 6mo
 
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kandjmomy
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 40
   Posted 7/15/2009 6:41 AM (GMT -6)   
Thanks for replying, Sara. I've tried: the IV cocktail of DHE, Benadryl, Toradol, Zofran; a lot of IV and oral steroids, trigger point injections, Topamax, Indocin, Cymbalta, Nortriptyline, antibiotics, Lyrica, many different NSAIDS and pain meds. I think I'm forgetting some meds, but none of them worked. Now I'm trying beta-blockers and I'm still on Lortab (although I only take that once a day when it's really bad).

I'm worried about the IV lidocaine admission, honestly. It's such a time commitment, and with 2 small children, it would be difficult. Plus, I've had some bad experiences being hospitalized during these 4 months, and it makes me nervous to do it again.

It would be great if I could hear your friend's experience as well as anyone else who has been treated for NDPH. Thanks!
Amanda

srheadale
New Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 7/17/2009 1:51 AM (GMT -6)   
Your headaches sound slightly different than what I deal with but I tried several of those medications also. My Dr finally found one that works for me. Its called Avenza it is a time released morphine.
 
 My migraines lasted about 6 months then a couple of days of freedom till the next one would kick in. I dont know where I would be had we not played with all the meds. It being their test subject but once you find something that works its worth it.
 
Just keep trying it will be worth it!

Krista07
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 7/17/2009 1:19 PM (GMT -6)   
I just got back from a visit with my neurologist. He just pinpointed to me as well that he believes that I too have New Daily Persistent Headaches. He as well, said it is one of the toughest diagnoses to treat as it's so "new".
I told him that I'm sorry doc but I'm just not going too...and cannot go about living a normal life when I have a headache everyDAY....some I can deal with and move along with my day....and then there are the others....the ones where I feel like I am being shocked by an electric bolt in my temple area that just make me want to die.
I told him I don't want anything to do with narcotics....been down that road to no uveil.
He suggested we give Ultram a shot....anyone have any luck with this?
Krista
 
DX:  Migraines w/o aura, NDPH, Meniere's Disease, vertigo, insomnia, and anxiety.
 
RX:  Propanolol, Compazine, Buspar, Celexa, Zofran, Midrin, Ultram, Toradol IM, and Benadryl IM.
 
"It isn't what you have, or who you are, or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy....it is what you think about"


Tatyanna
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 7/20/2009 2:45 PM (GMT -6)   

I also have terrible headaches almost daily...and although many of them don't feel like full-blown migraines, I have had success with Imitrex and a couple of the other class called Triptans.  Not sure whether you all have tried that.

I've also used Ultram, both the regular and Extended-Release versions.  It was really, really effective and worked quite well for me in combination with my preventatives.  At the least, it would keep my headaches at such a low level that I COULD function.  Usually it would take them away completely.  However, after about 3 years of using it, I feel it has lost some of its ability to fight my headaches.  Worth a try for those who have not been on it though!!!


TATYANNA :)


Krista07
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 7/21/2009 1:51 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Tatyanna.
Yep....been down the road of triptans and what seems to be every possible preventative available to man kind!! YIKES!!
My problem is that since I have extreme vertigo and Meniere's Disease my body is ultra sensitive to meds so I'm limited at what I can and cannot take.
So far the Ultram hasn't done too much. I still have the excruciating "lighting bolt" pains into my right temple.
As you know, it's frustrating....so so frustrating. If you can think of anything else please let me know.

P.s....the Ultram ER....did you try that after using the regular Ultram?

Thanks Tatyanna!!
Krista
 
DX:  Migraines w/o aura, NDPH, Meniere's Disease, vertigo, insomnia, and anxiety.
 
RX:  Propanolol, Compazine, Buspar, Celexa, Zofran, Midrin, Ultram, Toradol IM, and Benadryl IM.
 
"It isn't what you have, or who you are, or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy....it is what you think about"


kandjmomy
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 40
   Posted 8/3/2009 6:35 PM (GMT -6)   
Isn't Ultram a narcotic as well? I don't know much about it.

I go to the headache neuro. tomorrow but I'm not optimistic. Beta-blockers didn't do much. I don't know what he'll try next.

Amanda

tysmyboo
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2004
Total Posts : 921
   Posted 8/5/2009 2:10 AM (GMT -6)   
I have taken ultram before and it seemed a lot less effective for me...but I have a very high tolerance...:-(

Do you all ever feel like if you could just "break the cycle" you would be in a lot better place? I'm in a funk and very much to that point right now.

Amanda, let us know what s/he suggests! Good luck
Sara-Migraine/Headache Forum Moderator
Battling headpain for 17 years.
DX: occipital neuralgia-radiofrequency nerve ablation every 6mo
 
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kandjmomy
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 40
   Posted 8/5/2009 2:57 PM (GMT -6)   
I know how you feel, Sara. It's been a long several months, especially for someone who has never had bad headaches before (other than short menstrual ones). I'd love to break the cycle.

The doc put me on much higher doses of beta-blockers to see if that would help, but he reminded me that hospitalization isn't out of the question. When I said I'd rather not do that yet, he said that he still had some options (i.e., meds) to try before we get to the hospitalization point. It's just hard to feel hopeful when you feel like a guinea pig with all of these meds.

He suggested melatonin to help fall asleep. Anyone use it? I tried it last night and I felt lousy, but it could have been a coincidence. I'll try it again tonight.

Krista07
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 8/6/2009 11:35 AM (GMT -6)   
What exactly does the IV Lidocaine do? "Break" the cycle of consistent headaches? Is this out-patient??
 
Anyone who has done this before could you please fill me in on the details.....thank you!!
Krista
 
DX:  Migraines w/o aura, NDPH, Meniere's Disease, vertigo, insomnia, and anxiety.
 
RX:  Propanolol, Compazine, Buspar, Celexa, Zofran, Midrin, Ultram, Toradol IM, and Benadryl IM.
 
"It isn't what you have, or who you are, or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy....it is what you think about"


kandjmomy
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 40
   Posted 8/6/2009 6:58 PM (GMT -6)   
Hey Krista,
I know that several people on this board have done the IV Lidocaine treatment, which is inpatient and most likely continuous for the full hospital stay. If you search IV Lidocaine, you'll get good descriptions of it. Here's one:
http://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=31&m=1290659
I know that Ben has done it at Jeff before (where I go as well). Hopefully he'll see this and answer any questions we have.

tysmyboo
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2004
Total Posts : 921
   Posted 8/7/2009 5:18 PM (GMT -6)   
WHERE IS BEN!?!??!? I meant to ask yesterday but I have really been struggling...
Sara-Migraine/Headache Forum Moderator
Battling headpain for 17 years.
DX: occipital neuralgia-radiofrequency nerve ablation every 6mo
 
Thanks for Visiting HealingWell.com, Please Donate to keep Healingwell alive!
 
 
ER Treatment Form
 
 


kandjmomy
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 40
   Posted 8/8/2009 12:32 PM (GMT -6)   
Is everything okay, Sara? I'm so sorry that you are having a hard time. Hope it gets better soon!

Amanda

korbnep
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 326
   Posted 8/9/2009 12:01 AM (GMT -6)   
tysmyboo said...
WHERE IS BEN!?!??!? I meant to ask yesterday but I have really been struggling...


I'm sorry to have disappeared. I got out of the hospital on July 14th or 15th, having withdrawn from oxycontin and undergone a second course of IV ketamine infusion. My thought had been that the benefit of not having to deal with the side effects of narcotic painkillers would be greater than the resultant increase in pain. After all, what's a bit more pain when on a very good day you don't drop below an 8 out of 10 on the pain scale? After more than six years of this my perception of pain has become rather...obfuscated?--at the very least it can only be evaluated on my own terms as I've long since lost any memory of what "pain free" feels like to compare my current status to.

However, it turns out that when pain reaches a certain intensity, a change in its magnitude, which I felt would be experienced as a quantitative increase (which wouldn't mean very much given a wholly relative pain scale, having lost all points of reference), instead caused a rather qualitative change, increasing my suffering far beyond what I expected.

One thing that I've learned is to differentiate between the concepts of pain and the perception of pain (or pain and suffering). My pain level has been unceasingly very severe for years but the deggree to which I've suffered has varied a great deal even when the pain levels have gone unchanged for some periods of time. While I haven't given up all hope of a solution to my persistent headaches, realistically I have no expectation that they will abate any time soon. It's fair to say that I have very little control of the pain itself (having tried every treatment available {though not every treatment that there is...a point I may get to later}). But through actions such as exercise, meditation, rest, activity, drug therapy, etc. I have significantly more control over my suffering, or how the pain affects me.

Thanks to the neurally inhibitory and dissociative effects of ketamine I was able to try to take control of my suffering after I was discharged from the hospital with significantly greater pain. Though I initially felt that the pain was wholly unbearable, I did find that moderate low-impact aerobic exercise could, at least temporarily, break up the almost petrified state that my brain was going into from the uncontrolled pain. The first week that I was out of the hospital I went to the gym every day, more out of necessity than commitment. I was able to cope initially because of the "reset" of sorts that the ketamine treatment gave my mind--a reset not of the pain but more of the trauma that my brain endures in the accumulation of nonstop pain over long periods of time. Unfortunately, in enduring very severe pain for more than a week after my hospitalization it all started stacking up again, reestablishing that sort of "second-order" suffering that develops from having suffered so long in the first place. I'm sure this is something that many of us have experienced and is, in my opinion, the essence of the problem of chronic pain.

So I really became overwhelmed and have been trying very hard to deal with it. Unfortunately the pain is so great that even when I can bring myself to endure the primary experience of it I find that my personality is all but absent. I disengage socially and rarely speak even when something crosses my mind that I would normally share. I knew that ceasing painkiller use would make things harder but I expected it to get slowly easier as I acclimated to the increase of a pain that was already very much there, and also regained between mental acuity. But, again, this hasn't been the case as the continuous suffering accumulates into a level of mental trauma greater than what I had experienced before the hospitalization. So I think I will probably start taking pain medication again, though hopefully at a lesser dosage and frequency. And I admit this with no shame--realistically it seems like the only rational choice at this time, as much as I wish that the circumstances that necessitate it were different. And I do have some interesting new ideas about some new direction in my treatment.

Anyway, this has mostly been a mashup of describing the hospitalization as well as what 'm going through now, but I'd like to say a few things about the ketamine treatment itself. First I want to say that I think that ketamine is very possibly the best treatment for severe intractable pain available. I say this even as one suffering a great deal now despite having had ketamine infusion twice in the last 13 months. When I went in last year for the first time my reaction to the treatment was regarded by my neurology team as rather strange--that I experienced no decrease in pain whatsoever but reported that it was the best treatment that I had been given for my chronic pain in six years. Now this is not looked at as abnormal. Research has begun to be published that suggests that ketamine actually is not often very good at treating pain but is an indispensable tool for pain management.

It's primary use is still for the treatment of CRPS (which, by the way, I believe works almost exactly the same way as new daily persistent headache does--if you're interested in learning more read up on "wind-up pain" or "central sensitization") but it has shown a great deal of promise for a wide array of other neurological disorders, notably in treating trauma patients. I credit this success, in many ways, to ketamine's dissociative properties. It has the effect of dissociating, or breaking up (so to speak), our conscious thought patterns, or our mindsets. I think it goes without saying how destructive our mindsets can become from the continued experience of severe pain (or other trauma). To look at this is a more scientific way, ketamine is a strong NMDA receptor antagonist. It blocks the excitatory neurotransmitter Glutamate which is released en mass in response to pain stimulation (nociception). Most daily preventative medications for headaches work, at least in part, by decreasing the activity of glutamate.

As some of you may know, ketamine therapy is actually carried about in two very different protocols. The first is what was used for my ketamine infusion and the ketamine infusions of every other patient in the US who receives ketamine therapy. It is administered at a low dose (not to exceed 1mg/kg/hr) over a period of five days. Generally this type of ketamine therapy is helpful to patients but rarely, if ever, has any substantial long-term or curative effect. The other protocol is the administration of ketamine at anesthetic levels--levels high enough to induce coma. This much high dosing is closely monitored and the patient is kept in a coma state for, I believe, 7-10 days. It has been reported that nearly half of patients who undergo this more radical treatment experience FULL recovery and more or less all of the rest experience substantial long-term relief. This type of treatment is illegal in the US. Currently medically induced comas may last no longer than 3 days. The FDA will not consider approving ketamine induced coma due to (in their words) the absence of any double blind trials being published (yes, that does beg the question of what exactly could be used as a placebo for a coma). Also, it has been pointed out that the cost of operating centers to administer this type of therapy would be very very high. Given the influence of insurance company lobbying I do not doubt that these financial considerations are given equal weight to safety concerns. As it is, many of those who can afford it fly to Germany for this treatment, frequently at the advice of their American neurologists. However, with the cost exceeding the level of tens of thousands of dollars very few have the opportunity.

Well, I've said a lot and I'm sorry for the utter lack of organization in my post. There's a good deal more that I've learned about the pathophysiology of chronic pain as well as potential treatments. If anyone wants to learn more, please let me know. But in the interest of keeping this post "readable", I'll leave it at that.

Ben
DX: NDPH, Recovered CRPS
RX: Lamictal, Concerta (Methylphenidate), Clonazepam, Wellbutrin XL, Namenda, Oxycontin, Oxycodone, Melatonin, Magnesium supplements.
PRN: Ketamine nasal spray, Celebrex, Migranal, Haloperidol, Zyprexa, Lodine, Zofran, Phenergan, Thorazine, DHE IM, Droperidol IM, Toradol, Reglan, Ambien CR, Provigil, and all triptans


snowflake
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 587
   Posted 8/9/2009 10:36 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi i have been suffering severe migraines and cluster migraines for 22yrs most times have been admitted to hospital for up to a week on seeveral occassions .i have been given iv pethadine and maxalon on numerous admissions sometimes this has helped othertimes its just a matter of letting them take teir course .in recent years i find by putting an ice pac over my eyes for several hours does help relieve the severe pain and throbbing .
One dr had prescribed sandomigraine but i found it useless after being on it for many months ,then finally i was given a drug used to treat hight bood pressure called Minax  i take 75mg twice daily and it has reduced the frequency of the migraines . I do not have high but this drug is used to dilate the blood vessels in the brain allowing the blood to flow freely . Just  thought i woul share what has relieved the severity of my migrains in a hope that it may help someone .
Good luck Snowflake

Chuckvstar
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 11/23/2009 8:13 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi, I have been suffering from what has just been diagnosed as "New Daily Persistant Headache" for over 2 years.  I have tried about every drug out there for treatment without success.  My neurologist is now recommending botox injections, which she says they have had quite a bit of success with.  Has anyone out there tried that yet.  If so what has been your experience.
Chuck

styxmark
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2009
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 12/3/2009 10:57 AM (GMT -6)   

On Friday, September 25th, 2009 my 43 year old wife Karen got a headache that quickly progressed into the first migraine of her life.  By the following Monday, I had taken her into the emergency room for the first time when her migraine reached a six on a pain scale of 1-10.  It is now the beginning of December and she has had this one continuous migraine headache for more than two months, usually at a pain level of 3 to 5!

A little history… about one week before this all started, my wife had what our primary care physician diagnosed as a viral infection.  She was also taking Trazadone and Budeprion  at the time, which she had started approximately two weeks before the migraine began and has since stopped taking the Trazadone as of October 16th and the Budeprion as of November 23rd.  It is still too soon to see if the Budeprion is a contributing factor.   It should also be noted that Karen started her period on September 25th, the same day the migraine started.

The first time Karen was in the emergency room, they diagnosed her as having a cluster migraine.  The hospital sent her on her way, but by the next weekend she was seen in the ER again and this time was admitted. 

She has been seen by a neurologist, as well as by the Medical Director of the Mercy Health Research and Ryan Headache Center.  A question came up a few weeks ago about whether or not Karen had an MRI and spinal tap.  The doctor seemed surprised that she had not; only a CT scan.   We were told that the MRI would have only been ordered if the CT scan would have shown an abnormality… is the MRI/spinal tap something that should be done to rule something/anything out?   I’m also wondering if this headache may be more “physical”, i.e. a pinched nerve, etc?   Karen started seeing a chiropractor a couple of weeks ago, and his treatments give her a little relief.

The doctors are continuing to prescribe preventative medications for her head, but if the headache NEVER goes away, are the preventatives doing any good?  In your experience, what is the worst case scenario that Karen is facing… we have come to terms that this headache may last the rest of her life (by which she is very depressed about), but could it be something worse?

The prescriptions that the doctors currently have Karen on are Piroxicam 20mg, Methocarbamol 750mg, Clonazepam 0.5mg, and Topiramate 25mg.  As I mentioned, until November 23rd, she was also taking Budeprion XL 150mg.  The doctor replaced the Budeprion with Cymbalta.  Karen can take Maxalt-MLT 10mg for the very severe headaches.  Additionally, she is taking magnesium supplements and 5-HTP.  She is also taking Lipitor 20mg to keep her cholesterol under control.  Light definitely makes the headache worsen as well as noise…  We have not been able to determine if any foods, smells, etc. are affecting her adversely.

Karen has taken several other medications such as Frova (Frovatriptan), but it didn’t offer any relief.   We have heard some information, and we are wondering if Imitrex would work, but her doctors have not prescribed it to her?

It should also be noted that around this same time, an 11cm (4.33 inch) cyst was found on my wife’s right ovary that was believed to possibly be cancerous.  On October 27th, a total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH-BSO) was performed.  The cyst was benign, which was the first piece of good news we had gotten in over a month.


Chuckvstar
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 12/3/2009 12:47 PM (GMT -6)   

To Styxmark: Sorry to hear your wife is having so many issues going on in her life.  Has to be tough on you also. 

Regards to the MRI and spinal tap.  Definitely should have both done.  The CT scan is more for structural issues and the MRI is more for soft tissues and for vessels.  Sometimes they need to follow with a CT angio if the vessels on the MRI look to be abnormal.  The spinal tap should be done form chemistry imbalance and also to see what the pressure is and to determine if there is a spinal leak or a small vessel leak in the brain.   As far as the medications are concerned to take preventative medications it is a waste of time and money.  The headache needs to break first before they will do any good.  I went to two neurologists in my home town without success and then went to the medical university of South Carolina headache clinic without success.  I have just recently been referred to Duke and their headache clinic where she finally diagnosed it as new persistant daily headache and the symptoms do fit.  We have tried several medications to date without success, she is now talking about botox injections saying they have had considerable success with that.  Should make me look younger anyway, ha ha. 

Would strongly suggest you go to a university medical center where there is some research going on regarding headaches.  Keep shopping for someone who can help.  Medical science knows little about headaches.  Hope she finds help and gets better

Chuck


styxmark
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2009
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 12/3/2009 12:53 PM (GMT -6)   
Thank you Chuck... we'll talk to her doctor.  Her doctor is the head of a headache research center, so hopefully they are on the leading edge of knowledge!

timur
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 86
   Posted 12/28/2009 6:30 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi, my last diagnoses was NDPH (mid 2008) and iv had some sort of headache(medium-high in severity) for 8 years with severe back/tmj pain which was non-relenting. I never really had luck with meds and treatment (such as chiropractors, acupuncture, phsiotherapy etc) which were not very helpful and money draining. My real improvement started a year back when i discovered the HUGE psychological link with my headache when I read the book "pain free for life"(brady scott). Its incredible how much emotions are burried or even caused when you suffer with such a condition. My mind was under immense amount of stress due to chronic pain that I couldn't even think (i actually thought the headache is causing some sort of brain damage). Since i realised this connection I followed it further by attending classes that teach this form of meditation & intense special breathing exercises (AOL sudarshan kriyas). The first week of this class i felt a real relief especially in my back. I have been practising these excercises for 5 months now and my back pain is practically disappeared (hasn't returned), my tmj tension is only very mild and my headache is quite mild-medium now which i am sure will improve over time & practise. I can manage to live my life more "normal" having a clearer mind and much more energy...some advice for anyone with NDPH, in my opinion it is important to accept that you live with this first and then find a way to deal with it...please don't give in to it or it can rule your life....

Post Edited (timur) : 12/29/2009 12:46:52 AM (GMT-7)


Femmer
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2009
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 12/31/2009 11:10 AM (GMT -6)   
My 13 yr. old son has had a headache since Oct. 26. Teachers insisted it was too much extra curricular activities- music and drama. The doctors are running a number of tests- blood work, CT scan (we are waiting for results) but are leaning heavily towards NDPH as the diagnosis. Has anyone found chiropractic care to help? Due to his age and medication allergies, there is a more limited amount of medications available to him. Any information/suggestions you can provide, would be greatly appreciated.

timur
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 86
   Posted 1/3/2010 5:31 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi femmer,
 
When i went to a chiropractor for my headaches, they had told me that my hip was "imbalanced" as one leg was longer than the next which put pressure on my body and muscles. I was certain this was the cause and i scheduled myself for many appointments. After each session, i did feel a difference with a short feeling of some relief (maybe an hour or so) but it always came back to normal. As i was determined to get my body balanced (and thus get rid of my headache) i went so many times which cost a smalll fortune. To cut a long story short, it was a waste of time, money and effort (which got me more frustrated than ever). I am sure there are people out there who have benefited but this was my experience with chiropractors and is not recommended by me.....
I really wish your sons test results come back normal...

givenup
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 94
   Posted 1/5/2010 1:49 PM (GMT -6)   
BEN just wondering where did you receive these ketamine infusions? Thomas Jefferson?
GIVENUP

tmjpain
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 2021
   Posted 1/11/2010 1:15 PM (GMT -6)   
tysmyboo said...
Hi Amanda!
You may want to try the IV Lidocaine, one of my best girlfriends has been doing that for her NDPH and has had great results. What other types of things have you tried so far?!

(I will see if I can have my friend stop by and post a message)

I AM LOOKING INTO THIS AS WELL, TO SEE IF IT IS DONE IN ONTARIO AND WHO CAN DO IT FOR ME. i HAVE ALSO HEARD THAT THE KETAMINE INFUSION WORKS AS WELL.

DID YOU GET ANY INFO FROM YOUR FRIEND? I WILL READ FURTHER DOWN THE POSTS IN CASE YOU DID ALREADY ANSWER ON THAT.

I AM READY TO TRY ANYTHING THAT WILL TAKE AWAY THIS DAILY HORRIBLE PAIN. IT'S VERY DIFFICULT TO LIVE WITH CONSTANT PAIN. WELL I WOULDN'T CALL IT LIVING WHAT I AM DOING RIGHT NOW. I HAVE LOST MY LIFE DUE TO THIS PAIN. THANKS FOR LISTENIN.

 

SUZANE

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