Rebiject II injector or needle?

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snowdog
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 137
   Posted 9/11/2006 5:26 PM (GMT -6)   
Anybody had experience with this? (Rebif)

uppitycats
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 2135
   Posted 9/11/2006 7:03 PM (GMT -6)   
Is that the autoinjector?  I've not had experience with the Rebif version of it, but there's one for Betaseron, too -- which I tried, once, and rejected outright.  It seemed cumbersome and complicated to use, left a nasty bruise.  I just simply inject.
 
Some folks swear by it, though...
...I am not a doctor, nor health professional, and don't pretend to be one, here.....


shellypoo
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 896
   Posted 9/11/2006 7:09 PM (GMT -6)   
It really depends on how comfortable you are injecting yourself!  I used the rebif autoinjector because I couldn't do it without!  I also had a friend inject me without it once and there wasn't any difference pain or reaction wise, so it's up to you.
 
Rebif pays to have a home health nurse (actually all of them do) to come and teach you how to give the injections.  Your neuro has to request it though.
 
Take care,let us know what you decide and how it goes.  BTW...with rebif I used to take all 3 syringes out for the week and keep them in a plastic container so I didn't have to worry about taking them out early enough to warm up.
Michelle ><>
 
Don't be so busy doing good
that you neglect to do what's right!


snowdog
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 137
   Posted 9/12/2006 9:39 AM (GMT -6)   
Michelle,
I noticed that it (autoinjector) says you can adjust the needle length? What benefit does that give you? Less pain, redness, or what?

My Neuro already put the call in for the nurse to stop by later in the week. I appreciate the warm up tip. Thanks for all your help.

shellypoo
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 896
   Posted 9/12/2006 10:32 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Dogday,
The needle depth is designed for comfort.  I tried all the depths and the deepest one was best for me.  The shallow one seemed to cause more topical reactions.  It also depends on your build, if you're very thin, you may need the shallowest one.
 
If I can walk you through any of it I'll be glad to do so, just email me.  When my home health nurse came for Rebif, I had to teach her how to use the auto injector!!!
 
One tip, get some Tucks pads or witch hazel, it helps a little with reactions.  Also, cortisone cream helps a little.  I realied on an icepack over the site area before the injection but that is personal  preferrence.
 
Be sure to rub the area really well with the tucks or witch hazel pad after your injection.
 
Take care.  Keep us posted!
 
 
Michelle ><>
 
Don't be so busy doing good
that you neglect to do what's right!


snowdog
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 137
   Posted 9/12/2006 11:39 AM (GMT -6)   
Ok Michelle, Uppity......I don't think I have ever seen a discussion or comments on using a local anthesia before the shots. With kids they use BLT cream for B12 shots, sometimes Amethone swipes before vacinations on baby's legs, etc etc. (this coming from a guy that just had a Solu-Medrol treatment 2 hours ago and it didn't phase me, but this self injection thing is hard to visualize and certainly makes me nervous)

shellypoo
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 896
   Posted 9/12/2006 11:54 AM (GMT -6)   
Dogday,
I tried the lidocaine patches and they didn't do anything!!  Very expensive and so disappointing!  The ice pack helps some.  I pray you will not have the pain I had from the injection.  The medicine is what burns not the injection.  Lots of people have no pain whatsover.  Think good thoughts!
Michelle ><>
 
Don't be so busy doing good
that you neglect to do what's right!


Counting My Blessings
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 53
   Posted 9/12/2006 12:02 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi - I actually wanted to go on Rebif because they offerred an auto injector but my neuro said that he thought Avonex was the way to go for me. I didn't know then that they didn't have an auto injector at that time (maybe they do now, not sure) so I learned to just do my own injections. Now, I'm glad that I was kind of "forced" into learning that because I am comfortable with it. As Michelle said, it all depends on your comfort level with the injection style. I also use an ice pack prior to injecting but have never used any of the topicals before hand. It will be a year in November that I will have been injecting once a week and I really don't have much of a problem anymore.

Best of luck to you with whatever you decide - I hope it goes smoothly for you.
Karla

photogirl1358
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 299
   Posted 9/14/2006 6:42 AM (GMT -6)   

Hi there,

I am on Betaseron which also comes with an autoinjector.  The nurse who taught me made me learn how to do it both ways which I'm glad about.

For the first while I used the autoinjector because it seemed less scary.  But I tried manual injections, and I now find them much better for me.  The autoinjector seemed to force the medicine in very quickly, which was painful.  Doing it manually I can inject the medicine slowly.  Like Michelle said, it's the medicine that burns a bit, not the needle.

I didn't notice any difference in the injection site reactions or bruising with either method. 

It is totally normal to be nervous at first.  But I'm sure in no time you'll just do it and not even think about it anymore  yeah You'll feel better once you see the nurse, and can see for yourself how simple and quick it is.

Best of luck,

Shar

 


If it's meant to be, it will happen


Dinafo
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2013
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 8/6/2013 4:16 PM (GMT -6)   
I started with the auto-injector, switched to self-injection and here's why. If you're auto-injecting, for example, 50 units of trimix, when you hit the auto-injector button, 50 units of trimix is going to be injected quickly wherever the tip of the needle is. If that's in the Corpus Cavernosa then you'll get good results. If you did it incorrectly, like maybe holding the injector at the wrong angle or having it slip from the spot at which you were aiming, you will get 50 units of trimix outside the Corpus Cavernosa. There's no turning back once you hit that button. With self-injection, you can "feel" around a little until you're in exactly the right spot. The plunger should depress easily. I prefer taking my time and hitting the "sweet spot" every time.
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