New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

uppitycats
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 2135
   Posted 12/5/2006 6:26 AM (GMT -6)   
Well, you already know I'm "not a doctor nor a medical professional".  Well, I'm not a scientist, either! tongue
 
But I do ascribe to Occam's Razor, a theory that says, "when you have more than one competing answer to a problem, look for the simplest explanation first, and it's more likely accurate."  Well, at least that's the version my first neuro taught me.
 
Here is a web page that explains it more eloquently than I ever could, and relatively easy reading, too!: http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/General/occam.html
 
What's my point?  We already have a complex chronic disease (or diseases).  Let's not ascribe everything to the disease, especially if there is a simpler, more evident answer that can resolve it. Another way of talking about this is something another doctor told me:  "When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not zebras!".  In other words, eliminate all the obvious and common reasons for something, and if that doesn't work, then start digging deeper.
 
Now of course this can be taken too far, and we've all encountered doctors or other people who are dismissive of symptoms, "...oh, that's just.... (fill in blank: anxiety, headache, body ache). EVERYBODY has that!!"
 
But also remember that the skeptic may just be right! It MAY just be a common problem, that everybody has, and there is a relatively simple solution.
 
So if you get a new strange "symptom"...step back a bit from it, and examine it. Could it indeed be something relatively common, relatively ordinary, that people just deal with because it's part of being alive?  Like...an itchy scalp might just be dry skin, and if the skin is flaky, dandruff...nothing to do with MS, just dandruff.  Or the spider running up the leg might just be a spider...I slaughtered one just the other day that set  up housekeeping under my desk.  Or a sore back because backs are notorious fragile, sometimes, and even the slightest movement can trigger sciatica...and so on.
 
That's what I try to do, certainly for myself, and when I read others posts: Is there a common ordinary explanation for what I'm experiencing?  If so, what should I do about it? (Like, "back the heck up out of here(my desk), grab a vacuum, and suck up momma and her next of babies!!")  And then do it.  If that doesn't solve the problem, then dig deeper.
 
Anyway.  I found the article while I was wasting time doing something else, and thought I'd share..   :-)
...I am not a doctor, nor health professional, and don't pretend to be one, here.....


Nemekke
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 309
   Posted 12/5/2006 10:06 AM (GMT -6)   

Thank you thank you thank you Uppitycats :)

Your post shows an excellent perspective for dealing with any chronic illness.  I tend more to dismiss symptoms until things get so bad I can't ignore them anymore.

I like reading your posts because you provide a lot of insights.

*Hugs*

Michelle


Though we live in a world where anger and hatefulness seem to be the norm, we CAN make a difference, one person at a time.


Shashi
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 156
   Posted 12/5/2006 10:28 AM (GMT -6)   
I used to be a hostess on a women's health board for hysterectomy support. I was always having to remind the post-op ladies that not every symptom they had could be blamed on their surgery. Sometimes a sore throat is just a sore throat!

Like Michelle though, I have a tendency to ignore symptoms until they escalate into something that could probably have been prevented or minimized if I'd paid attention sooner.
Hugs,
 
Lisa ~
 
Living in Limboland!
 
Negative MRIs + Negative LP + Positive symptoms = A lot of confusion + A ton of frustration!


uppitycats
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 2135
   Posted 12/5/2006 2:25 PM (GMT -6)   

Well, yes, the "flip side" of Occam's Razor would be that:  a symptom crops up, you ascribe it to MS, and ignore it...and it turns out to be something either much worse, or something that, if you'd brought it to the attention of your doctor, could have been "fixed" much sooner.

I think it's all a matter of balance. Of taking a deep breathe, stepping back, examining all the possibilities, then going with what seems most logical at the time.  Do I get it right every time? Certainly not.  But it does save me a lot of worrying.

And of course there's the uppity's law of worrying:  I try to worry about those things over which I have some control...and let go of everything over which I have NO control.  Saves a few grey hairs.. :-)


...I am not a doctor, nor health professional, and don't pretend to be one, here.....


Nemekke
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 309
   Posted 12/5/2006 5:10 PM (GMT -6)   

Woohoo!!!!  I finally know the name of my philosophy in life....Uppity's Law!!!!!

You ought to start charging royalties....but not from me....since I came up with the idea...LOL

 

Michelle


Though we live in a world where anger and hatefulness seem to be the norm, we CAN make a difference, one person at a time.


DFC
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 136
   Posted 12/5/2006 5:12 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Everyone,

Has anyone heard the expression...pseudo flareups or attacks. I have been doing much research on them and the subject is very interesting. Has anyone else been following the subject at all. Would really like your input....

Dale

uppitycats
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 2135
   Posted 12/5/2006 7:21 PM (GMT -6)   

Are you talking about symptoms that intensify, problems that increase, when you're overheated, and/or tired, and/or sick (with a fever) with something else, like flu?  Yes, that can happen. Usually once the fever is reduced, and you're otherwise well again, the symptoms will subside.

If you're talking about something else, let us know!  :-)


...I am not a doctor, nor health professional, and don't pretend to be one, here.....


Mezazinine
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 100
   Posted 12/5/2006 8:36 PM (GMT -6)   
Hey DFC,

I've been reading up on those myself because I think I experience them. I'll get tingling in places that I was numb in during my flare in addition to tingling in places where I've never experienced symptoms before. I'm not sure that they're really exacerbations because they don't last long, only from a few min to maximally a day. I'm not sure what my trigger is exactly either. I don't consider myself to be heat sensitive as of yet because I can take billion degree showers or wait for the AC repair man all day in a Las Vegas condo in 120 degree heat with no symptoms. However, I had a cold a few days ago and I did not get a fever from it but I had the paresthesias coming out the wazoo. It was a weird experience because I'd get tingling in a few places for a while, stop and then start in other places. I'm starting to think my symptom trigger is stress. While I didn't have a fever during that episode, I was stressed out because I needed to study for a test but felt sick and could really get much done. Anyway, I'm not sure if that's what you're looking for. Just my random experiences.

DFC
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 136
   Posted 12/7/2006 4:52 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Uppity and Mezazinine,

Thanks both for your timely reply. I am know Uppity of the flareups you are referring to as I think they are the norm. However I have more of those flreups with sudden changes in temperature ( whether hot or cold) and the seasonal changes prevalent in my neck of the woods. However I am referring more to the type that Mezazinine refers to. They appear to be random however I am thinking that stress may be a trigger but my stress is so insidious sometimes it is just the flareups that warn me that I am stressed out. These flareups last for a short time and can lead to total loss of the use of my legs for a day or two. I used to worry about them but not anymore so maybe it is useful for us to look at the bigger picture. Keep track of our flareups and how long they last and if they are new or old symptoms. I am seeing an MS specialist at the MS clinic in Halifax in January and will take all my Mri discs and hardcopies and the results of all my other tests over the years. Actually he has them now so he can read them over before I see him. Any helpful hints of what ask him about. Thanks guys...you are the best.

Dale
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Thursday, September 21, 2017 8:52 PM (GMT -6)
There are a total of 2,871,529 posts in 315,110 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 156617 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, wusibenjk3.
422 Guest(s), 15 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
PeteZa, Wings of Eagles, MDNative, PeterDisAbelard., sebreg, cspivak, Bodan, The Dude Abides, Girlie, WalkingbyFaith, Lynnwood, ebonyeyez06, MK1965, wusibenjk3, Tim Tam


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2017 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer