Clothing for Parkinsons

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Noam
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Date Joined Feb 2006
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 2/27/2006 4:45 PM (GMT -6)   
I'd like to find clothing that is adaptable to someone with PD who does not have a lot of tremors, but who does have a lot of problems with fine motor skills.
 
The guides say velcro and drawstrings, but that kind of clothing would not work for someone who works in a profession that demands a certain formality in clothing. Should I just go to a tailor and ask him to refit existing clasps with larger hooks and eyes, and some occasional velcro?
 
 

yekkimo
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Date Joined Apr 2003
Total Posts : 1280
   Posted 2/27/2006 7:41 PM (GMT -6)   
Noam,

Welcome to healing well.I have tremors as well as lack of manual dexterity.I have found button shirts to be a horror show,and before long the shirts are buttonless.I use snaps on my shirts and that seems to work when I can't deal with buttons.Ditto for tie shoes which I often replace with velcro shoes.There are quite a few sites advertising this clothing.Try google and search clothing for manual handicapped.I have found both male and female clothing to be readily available.Stay in touch.glad you found us and remember the light is always on at healing well.Ed
Ed-Diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease in 1998.I am also Diabetic,and have major arthritis issues.As long as I can fish life is good.
 
support Healing Well thru the sponsors and with donations.The light is always on stay well,and listen to your neurologist.


Noam
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2006
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 2/28/2006 8:27 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks Ed -- really appreciate the advice and kind words. We've done the shoes thing, and am looking into snap button shirts.

lizzy4451
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 327
   Posted 3/8/2006 2:52 AM (GMT -6)   
Noam,
I'm not sure whether you are looking for male or female clothing. Either way, slip-on type of clog-type shoes are an option - ones that don't have to be tied. I have a male friend who had a tailor make dress shirts for him that only have one button on each sleeve (vs. 2+) which minimizes the amount of effort required to button sleeves. In a non-button-shirt environment, pull-over shirts or elasticized pants work well. Any dress options that minimize the use of fingers and fine-motor-skills are good.
 
Best of luck!
lizzy4451
Life is a dance. Don't sit it out. --- H. Jackson Brown


tingaling
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 12/29/2010 4:55 PM (GMT -6)   
Noam,
One way around the button on the sleeve problem is
step 1) take the button off, and stitch the button ON TOP of the buttonhole.
2) stitch a 1/2" of 1/4" elastic to one end where the button was originally stitched, the other to the back of the button hole (inside of the cuff).
Your hand is able to slide through the cuff now, but it appears closed, to the eye.
You can make your dress shirt a pull-on by keeping the bottom 4 buttons done up and using velcro on the top 3 buttons, again stitching the button on top of the buttonhole, and cheating the velcro underneath. Regarding the collar of the shirt....this is the challenge. A slightly larger button, with a shank of elastic stitched to it, attached it to the shirt,where the button originally was, should make it more accessible. It can still hide neatly behind a tie.

We use this trick for quick changes in the theatre.

Re dress pants: Most pants for Parkinsons seem to like elastic waistbands and drawstrings. My thought is, that you could get a tailor to cut the front of your suit pants as you would traditionally, but explain that you need the back of the pant cut with an elasticized waist. This will give you enough room to get them down fast. The other thing you might ask him to employ is a " pant hook" rather than button on the waistband. This is about 1" long and flat. Ask him to give you a discreet tab at the waistband front to help you pull the hook open. Consider 3 velcro 1" squares instead of a zipper in the fly.
Hope this helps,
Good luck!!!

Cheerbabe14
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2011
Total Posts : 8
   Posted 1/12/2011 4:07 PM (GMT -6)   
Noam said...
I'd like to find clothing that is adaptable to someone with PD who does not have a lot of tremors, but who does have a lot of problems with fine motor skills.



The guides say velcro and drawstrings, but that kind of clothing would not work for someone who works in a profession that demands a certain formality in clothing. Should I just go to a tailor and ask him to refit existing clasps with larger hooks and eyes, and some occasional velcro?


My dad has Parkinson's and what works for him is snaps. Also a sweatshirts are casual but really good for him cause he can move around in them

Hoagy
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2014
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 4/8/2014 8:09 AM (GMT -6)   
I have cbgd not sure what the onset date is could be 2010 so I may be around 3 years into it. Left foot and hand is turned in and left arm, shoulder and neck is giving me problems. I am using forearm crutches and rolater walker. Doctor told me I will end up in a wheel chair. My right arm and leg jump at night according to my wife. I have started seeing a naturopath
He has changed my breakfast to star along with the water I drink. I am not to eat anything that grows underground, and anything with sugar or yeast. He will change what I eat at lunch next and then dinner. I am told I will need to be tested for driving every 6 months. My wife said I need to stop now because I get confused in town with stop lights and stop signs. I am a 56 male. My understanding is people with cbgd last about 8 years from onset of the disease. I am current getting everything in order including talking my wife into selling our house and moving into a condo complex so when I am gone she won't have to worry about yard work and snow removal.
Just wondering if anyone can tell me what to expect next.
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