What is it like to die from prostate cancer?

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fulltlt
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 190
   Posted 11/3/2010 5:28 PM (GMT -6)   
Does anyone have any second hand knowledge of what it's like to die from prostate cancer?
Obviously I can't ask for any first hand knowledge.


Diagnosed in Feb 2010 with 8.2 psa and 3+4=7, second opinion was 4+4=8.
had 5 weeks of EBRT in Apr-May-Jun 2010 and 91 seeds of palladium 103 in July 2010
3 months later in Oct 2010 the psa was 3.97

Geebra
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 476
   Posted 11/3/2010 6:00 PM (GMT -6)   
I think this is a premature and pessimistic question. Nothing in your info indicates you are even close to pondering this.

My father died from PCa. He lost weight, was very weak in his last days. Then hospice got involved and his last few days were comfortable, but he was unconscious. His heart gave up in the end.

Not the beat way to go, but by far not the worst I can imagine.

Cajun Jeff
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Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 3651
   Posted 11/3/2010 6:04 PM (GMT -6)   
Not sure how to answer this question fultilt. The death process for most cancers is usually very debilitating and painful. From my understnading the progression is usually to the bone. In that case there is usually a great amount of pain. Today pain is managed must better than the past.

That is all I can give you in my knowlede base. You may want to send an e-mail to Paul1955. His Dad passed away from PCa the same wk that Paul got his diagnosis. He is the webmaster at franktalk.org

One other thought, My guess is that you are concerned for yourself. I hope some of the guys here that have dfficult situations here can chime in for you. There are other options to keep you away from the final story. Don't give us keep the fight going!

Cajun Jeff
9/08 PSA 5.4 referred to Urologist
9/08 Biopsy: GS 3+4=7 1 positive core in 12 1% cancer core
10/08 Nerve-Sparing open radicalSurgery Path Report Downgrade 3+3=6 GS Stage pT2c margins clea
r3 month: PSA <0.1
19th month: PSA <0.1
Only issue at this time is ED

Arch
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 178
   Posted 11/3/2010 6:36 PM (GMT -6)   
Who wants to think that way...be positive and enjoy life, even when it serves you setbacks. If you're really morbid...its probably no different than any other chronic disease, we all cope.
 
r
age 56
PSA 5.5
Biopsy, both lobes involved
Gleason 3/4=7
open RP May 18, 2010
Pathology: 15% involved, lymph nodes and v. d. clear, margins clear
June 3-10 10-12 pads/day
2 months 8 pads/day
Aug 1, 2010 5-6 pads/day
Aug 20, 2010 3-5 pads per day
Aug 16, 3 month PSA: undetectable
ED 95% with viagara
Sept 22, 2 pads a day
Oct 12, PSA 0.03
ED, 100% with viagara, just doeable without

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 24280
   Posted 11/3/2010 6:39 PM (GMT -6)   
as a first time poster here, what is your motivation for your question?
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 11/10 Not taking it
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/23/10

Fairwind
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2010
Total Posts : 2352
   Posted 11/3/2010 6:48 PM (GMT -6)   
fulltilt, it could be two years before your PSA reaches "nadir", it's lowest point..PSA anxiety can be VERY destructive..Dying is just the backside of being born..We are ALL going to die, but you don't have to dwell on it or obsess about it..
Age 68.
PSA at age 55: 3.5, DRE normal. Advice, "Keep an eye on it".
age 58: 4.5
age 61: 5.2
age 64: 7.5, DRE "Abnormal"
age 65: 8.5, " normal", biopsy, 12 core, negative...
age 66 9.0 "normal", 2ed biopsy, negative, BPH, Proscar
age 67 4.5 DRE "normal"
age 68 7.0 third biopsy positive, 4 out of 12, G-6,7, 9
RRP Sept 3 2010, pos margin, one pos vesicle nodes neg. Post Op PSA 0.9

60Michael
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Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 1823
   Posted 11/3/2010 7:12 PM (GMT -6)   
Fair question on his part, we just dont discuss that topic readily. It has passed my mind, but like a cloud, it floats away.
Michael
Dx with PCA 12/08 2 out of 12 cores positive 4.5 psa
59 yo when diagnosed, 61 yo 2010

Robotic surgery 5/09 Atlanta, Ga

Catheter out after 10 days

Gleason upgraded to 3+5, volume less than 10%

2 pads per day, 1 depends but getting better,

started ED tx 7/17, slow go

Post op dx of neuropathy

T2C left lateral and left posterior margins involved

3 months psa.01, 6 month psa.4

Ed C. (Old67)
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 2356
   Posted 11/3/2010 11:05 PM (GMT -6)   
That is a question that passes our mind but we never ask. We are all going to die one way or the other and we all wish that when the time comes that it is a painless death. We never know how it will happen so why worry about it? Your situation is not helpless so enjoy your life and move on.
Age: 67 at Dx on 12/30/08 PSA 3.8
2 cores out of 12 were positive Gleason (4+4)
Davinci surgery 2/9/09 Gleason 4+4 EPE,
Margins clear, nerve bundles removed
Prostate weighed 57 grams 10-20% involved
all PSA tests since (2, 5, 8, 11, 15, 18 months) undetectable
Latest PSA test (21 months) .005

Octorobo
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 96
   Posted 11/4/2010 12:17 AM (GMT -6)   
Many may have that asked that question- especially early on the journey. My 83 year old father in law had metastatic PC to the bones. Hospice care and morphine controlled his pain- He just faded away- very peaceful.

I read this last week- It really is becoming my desire.
"I want to be alive when I die. I want to have unfinished business!"

Had heart bypass surgery at 41. Got fired at 42. Started a business two days latter. Diagnosed with PC at 57- three years ago. Have first grandchild at 60.
Great business in terrible economy- awesome wife- daughter got nine month chip at AA tonight- miracles from a loving God abound!

Grateful for everyday of life- I want to dwell on life and be graciously prepared for eternity. Good luck on your journey. Most of us are going to be dealing with PC a very long time.

Glad you found this site and the great information from these wonderful individuals who are learning and sharing valuable information.

Blessings

Aimzee
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Date Joined May 2010
Total Posts : 1183
   Posted 11/4/2010 3:15 AM (GMT -6)   

fulltilt, you have asked a question many do not want to dwell on.  I think it is a fair question.  Sometimes doctors just do not want to address this issue, and without personal experience (a father, a brother) how would we know?   Maybe read up on the Internet?

There is a lot of support here, so feel free to come back and post.  Obviously, death in any form is scary.

Octorobo,  it was nice to read your reply.  Congratulations on the accomplishments in your life.  Grandchildren do provide a new perspective on life!

Worth repeating:

"I want to be alive when I die. I want to have unfinished business!"


Husband Ron, age 63
4/1/10 PSA 5.5 Prostate size = 50 cc.
Biopsy on 4/20/10 12 samples... Adenocarcinoma: 3 positive on right side, one core left base (5% ` 0.5 mm) - two cores of left lateral mid
(20% ~ 2mm, 10%, 10% ~ 1mm) - No Perineural Invasion
Gleason 6 (3+3)
Bone Scan/CT Negative (2 lesions on liver)
8/18/10 - Da Vinci Prostatectomy
Post Op: Gleason 7 (3+4)
Negative surgical margins and lymph nodes
Both nerve bundles spared
Catheter - 13 days
ED / Day time incontinence.
Post Surgery PSA 8 weeks - .01

English Alf
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Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 2087
   Posted 11/4/2010 4:11 AM (GMT -6)   
Welcome to the Forum
And to start with asking perhaps the most awkward question of them all.

All I have been made very aware of since my diagnosis is that we are all going to die one day and it will be for a variety of reasons, and at the moment I have got the question of my own mortality under control. This may not be the case for everyone and I do not wish to say anything that will upset anyone.

I know the general answer to the question you ask and I say "general" because one key aspect is that it is not the same for everyone, so no answer is really appropriate here. I should add that while not qualified medically in any way I come from a very medical family: most relevantly my mother was a nurse who was trained in "care of the dying" at the Royal Marsden Cancer Hospital in London, and my sister is a senior nurse at one of the UK's leading hospices. All I am fairly certain about is that this is an answer that needs to be given with care, understanding and love, and most relevantly it needs to be done at the right time. Being at the early stage of a disease that may not be going to kill you may not be the right time at all, so I am not going to give an answer.

However, as November is "National Hospice and Palliative Care Month", I think the wisest thing to suggest is getting some expert views about the whole business and perhaps a place to start would be these websites.

US
dying.about.com/

UK
www.cancerhelp.org.uk/coping-with-cancer/dying/what-happens-in-the-final-days-of-life

Alf

Post Edited (English Alf) : 11/4/2010 3:18:55 AM (GMT-6)


anxiety out the roof
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2010
Total Posts : 111
   Posted 11/4/2010 5:58 AM (GMT -6)   
My father had a saying when he was alive- " EVERYBODY WANTS TO GO TO HEAVEN, BUT NOBODY WANTS TO DIE."

Steve n Dallas
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 4051
   Posted 11/4/2010 6:08 AM (GMT -6)   
"Have you hugged your child today?"

Tudpock18
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 2714
   Posted 11/4/2010 7:46 AM (GMT -6)   
Fulltilt, I'm a little surprised at some of the answers you hve received but I suspect those answers reflect the anxiety and/or discomfort of the posters concerning the subject.  In any case, as Aimzee said, I thnk it's a fair question that is deserving of an answer.
 
I do not have personal experience at the side of a dying PCa patient so I cannot help you with any second hand personal experience.  However, I can refer you to an excellent website, www.yananow.net.  That site is full of first hand experiences of PCa patients.  Unfortunately some of these men have lost their fights with PCa.  Perhaps by reading some of the stories of the late days of some of the men who are noted as "RIP" you can glean some perspective on your question.
 
Tudpock (Jim)
Age 62 (64 now), G 3 + 4 = 7, T1C, PSA 4.2, 2/16 cancerous, 27cc. Brachytherapy 12/9/08. 73 Iodine-125 seeds. Procedure went great, catheter out before I went home, only minor discomfort. Everything continues to function normally as of 9/10/10. 6 month PSA 1.4, 1 year PSA at 1.0. My docs are "delighted"! My journey:
http://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=35&m=1305643

fulltlt
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 190
   Posted 11/4/2010 8:57 AM (GMT -6)   
Years ago I read the autobiography of Gilda Radner who died from ovarian cancer. I imagine her experiences would be similar in some if not many ways.

Casey59
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 3172
   Posted 11/4/2010 9:00 AM (GMT -6)   

I agree with Jim (Tudpock) and Aimzee on taking the question serious here.  Some men here will have to deal with PC death, but the reality is that most of us won't. 

I think it's helpful for all of us to be better informed and educated about aspects of the disease we have been touched by.  As we become more educated (and help others become more educated), we all more clearly realize that, for example, more PC patients die from heart disease than PC. 

This can be what's called a "teachable moment" for readers to take-away the important lesson that the same plan of committing to a good diet, exercise and lifestyle modification that has been shown to slow or stop the progression of prostate cancer's key marker in some men is also good one's heart...


Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 24280
   Posted 11/4/2010 9:50 AM (GMT -6)   
Most of us don't want to think or sit around thinking about the ultimate morbid side to a death from PC, thus the variety of answers. With modern hospice practices and proper pain management, even such a death as this can be managed, to keep the patient from suffering the worse of the pains associated with. With close to 30k a men in the US alone dying from PC, I am sure the question asker could get a more accurate detailed account of such a death from them. Or, if someone here cared to share a first hand experience with the death of a close loved one from PC.

We are all trying to survive this thing called PC here, and we have men in all stages of the battle, some better off, some much worse. The dying part, however one ultimately dies, will take care of itself at the appointed time.

Speaking for myself only, I have been through so much hell the past 2 years with PC and its after effects, that it takes all my concentration to recover and try to get myself back into the game called life. If I thought too much about the dying part, I would lose all hope and confidence that my fight to make it, was even worth it.


David in SC
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 11/10 Not taking it
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/23/10

Ricky2
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2009
Total Posts : 96
   Posted 11/4/2010 10:16 AM (GMT -6)   
Bravo Octorabo! It is all about attitude. We all have setbacks in life and some a lot more significant than others, but the people that have the right attitude are the ones that will be successful, happiest and probably live the longest.
My dad died of untreated PC at the age of 89. We did not know he had PC until a week before he died. He knew, but never told us. He never suffered much, was not given any pain medication and just sort of faded away. We brought a martini into the hospital, fed it to him with a sponge and we watched him smile. Three days later he died. It was a wonderful death with his whole family around his bedside.. I am not worried about death from PC. I just want to live every day to the fullest and don't want to forget to thank God for all He has given me..

Ricky
Age 70
PSA 7/09- 6.1, retested 9/09-5.1.
Biopsy 9/09 4 of 12 positive.G3+4
RALP 10/09
Path Rep.G3+4 Margins slightly involved <.1mm to .25mm. Perineural invasion present, stage pT2c. Tumor 18%. Seminal Vesicle & nodes - clear. ED: use VED for therapy Trimex and quadmix don't give usable erection. hoping for implant someday.
3 PSA through 8/10 <.1

Steve n Dallas
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 4051
   Posted 11/4/2010 10:52 AM (GMT -6)   
I watched a co-worker lose a four year battle with breast cancer. It was a slow horrible death.
 
Chemo then a year of remission.
Chemo then six months of remission.
Chemo then a couple months of remission.
Then chemo....
 
Not only did she have every side effect a person could have – the side effects were major. She’d get so sick from the chemo they would have to stop it so she could get better....to do more chemo…
 
Then there were the direct radiation treatments to the various tumors that popped up all over....
 
She got accepted into a trial program in Huston in her last few weeks. She got her hopes up – drove down to get some tests done. They sent her home and told her to make peace with God.
 
Her husband and I had many talks about how we couldn’t have dealt with what she went through. Kristi, (age 47) may she rest in peace – didn’t get to see her youngest child graduate from high school.

medved
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Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 968
   Posted 11/4/2010 10:52 AM (GMT -6)   
Here's one person's experience. Just the facts here, since the OP asked and I figure he's entitled to the best answer I can give. I do apologize if this makes anyone feel uncomfortable. I can understand how any discussion of this topic might do that. My father died of prostate cancer. Initially, it spread to his lungs and other organs -- before bone. That's a bit unusual. He had no pain at that point, but as the lungs got worse he had some difficulty breathing, so needed oxygen. Didn't interfere with his going out because he had a portable tank in addition to the "big one" he kept at home. But of course it is annoying. He also got tired and needed to nap a lot. When it spread to his bone, there was more pain, so he went on some painkillers. He also had some "spot radiation" to the site of the bone mets, which helped with bone pain. As the bone mets got worse, and the pain increased, he went on morphine. At that point, he was under hospice care. He was living at home, not in a hospice facility -- but the hospice nurse visited, and was also available for questions by phone. He took the morphine every 6 hours around the clock. The morphine made him a bit foggy, but it killed the pain. As things progressed, the morphine dose was increased. The morphine was quite effective. Over the last several months, he lost a lot of weight. He did not have much appetite. Sometimes he forced himself to eat, mostly at the urging of relatives. But the hospice people said "don't force him to eat -- loss of appetite is a normal part of the process." He often got very thirsty. One doctor told us that might be a side effect of the chemotherapies he previously had. He also started sleeping more. Eventually, he was sleeping something like 80% of the day. He would wake up for a half hour or so, and then go back to sleep. There were a few other symptoms, like constipation, but they were readily dealt with with meds provided by hospice. At the very end, he had a bit of anxiety, and the hospice provided Ativan for that. Seems like the combination of the Ativan and the morphine caused the end. The things that helped my father through this process: (1) visits from family; (2) hospice -- I think many wait too long to get them involved (why suffer? they can help); and (3) a very strong religious faith, which made him accept was was happening (not intended to spur debate about religion -- just one guy's personal experience).
Age 46.  Father died of p ca. 
My psa starting age 40: 1.4, 1.3, 1.43, 1.74, 1.7, 1.5, 1.5
 

bsjoplin
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2010
Total Posts : 291
   Posted 11/4/2010 11:17 AM (GMT -6)   
fulltlt: you mentioned reading of Gilda Radner...if you're a reader, you may be familiar with Cornelius Ryan, author of "THE LONGEST DAY".  he was diagnosed in 1970, died in 1974.  his wife released, after his death, a book called "A PRIVATE BATTLE", a telling of his fight with PCa, as detailed in their separate journals.  it's not fun reading, and it doesn't include the same medical tools that we presently have available, but it does nail down from a historian's point of view, what he was going through.  his last (war/history) book was totally written after his diagnosis, and some of his medical decisions had to be made to accommodate getting his book down on paper if and while he could.
if you really wanted to know, then this is a good resource.  then you have to slide that back to the back of your brain along with a lot of other stuff that you pick up along the way, and enjoy where YOU are RIGHT NOW.  i'm loving my family, and new granddaughter, and 2 grand-dogs, and the beautiful maple trees in Fall, and a strong faith and a good job, and just where i am now...i've got a post SRT PSA coming up in about a week, and it could be bad news, but i'm working on the assumption now that we'll take care of whatever we need to, WHEN we need to. so don't dwell on it...
take care, and don't be a stranger...
bob
 
Age@dx: 55
5/05 PSA: 1.8 ;12/07 PSA: 3.7 ;7/08 PSA:4.7
8/08 Biopsy1: 3 of 6 irreg
11/08 PSA: 6.5; 12/08 Biopsy 2: of 12, 3 cancer, other 9 irreg; Gl:3+3=6.
1/22/09 RRP; 1/25/09 Released; 1/28/09 Pathology: Cancer on 10% of gland, lymph & SV were benign, Gl re-typed 3+4=7, stage T2c
2/13/09 PSA:0.1
3/9/09 back to work
6/09 PSA:0.1; 10/09 PSA:0.1; 2/10 PSA:0.3 ; 4/10 PSA:0.4 Referred to RO
5/4/10 First RT.;6/25/10 Final RT. ended up 36 treatments, 64.8 Gy.
8/10 PSA:0.2

fulltlt
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 190
   Posted 11/4/2010 11:27 AM (GMT -6)   
bsjoplin said...
fulltlt: you mentioned reading of Gilda Radner...if you're a reader, you may be familiar with Cornelius Ryan, author of "THE LONGEST DAY". he was diagnosed in 1970, died in 1974. his wife released, after his death, a book called "A PRIVATE BATTLE", a telling of his fight with PCa, as detailed in their separate journals. it's not fun reading, and it doesn't include the same medical tools that we presently have available, but it does nail down from a historian's point of view, what he was going through. his last (war/history) book was totally written after his diagnosis, and some of his medical decisions had to be made to accommodate getting his book down on paper if and while he could.
if you really wanted to know, then this is a good resource. then you have to slide that back to the back of your brain along with a lot of other stuff that you pick up along the way, and enjoy where YOU are RIGHT NOW. i'm loving my family, and new granddaughter, and 2 grand-dogs, and the beautiful maple trees in Fall, and a strong faith and a good job, and just where i am now...i've got a post SRT PSA coming up in about a week, and it could be bad news, but i'm working on the assumption now that we'll take care of whatever we need to, WHEN we need to. so don't dwell on it...

take care, and don't be a stranger...

bob



I am a reader. This is what I was looking for. I will get the book from the library.

I am also in the middle of writing a book that I want to get finished.

Fairwind
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2010
Total Posts : 2352
   Posted 11/4/2010 11:28 AM (GMT -6)   
Medved gives a pretty accurate account..Our daughter died in our home from breast cancer.. She went pretty fast.. Hospice care was a GREAT help..The morphine pump is the main tool that makes passing go smoothly and quietly..Unable to swallow food or liquid, the actual cause of death was dehydration and organ shut-down...Breathing becomes labored and then just stops....Free at last....
Age 68.
PSA at age 55: 3.5, DRE normal. Advice, "Keep an eye on it".
age 58: 4.5
age 61: 5.2
age 64: 7.5, DRE "Abnormal"
age 65: 8.5, " normal", biopsy, 12 core, negative...
age 66 9.0 "normal", 2ed biopsy, negative, BPH, Proscar
age 67 4.5 DRE "normal"
age 68 7.0 third biopsy positive, 4 out of 12, G-6,7, 9
RRP Sept 3 2010, pos margin, one pos vesicle nodes neg. Post Op PSA 0.9

compiler
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 5230
   Posted 11/4/2010 11:40 AM (GMT -6)   
I also just finished reading "A Private Battle." That was a FANTASTIC BOOK!
The first 40 pages or so went slow (too much descriptive material) but after that I couldn't put it down.
 
It really did capture many of the emotions/fears entailing this disease.
 
I have to say that Ryan performed amazingly well with this rotten disease. I admire his true courage.
 
I often wondered what his pathology would have been. I suspect PSA was non-existent at that time.
 
The subject for this thread is very unpleasant and it is clear from the answers that we tend to avoid dealing with it directly. Yet, despite all the grandiose answers, we KNOW this cuts to the heart of some of our worst fears.
 
From what I know, end-stage cancer in general is very unpleasant and it is certainly true for PC.
 
We also know that hospice care would be invaluable in providing pain relief and in easing our final journey.
 
Mel
PSA-- 3/08--2.90; 8/09--4.01; 11/09--4.19 (PSAf: 24%), PCA3 =75 .
Biopsy 11/30/09. Gleason 4+3. Stage: T1C. Current Age: 64
Surgery: Dr. Menon @Ford Hospital, 1/26/10.
Pathology Report: G 4+3. Nodes: Clear. PNI: yes. SVI: No. EPE: yes. Pos. Margin: Yes-- focal-- 1 spot .5mm. 100% continent by 3/10. ED- in progress. First post-op PSA on 3/10/10-: 0.01. PSA on 6/21/10--0.02. 9/21/10--0.06

Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 7665
   Posted 11/4/2010 11:57 AM (GMT -6)   
I had the opportunity to exchange email with Randy Pausch. The author of the last lecture...Here is his brief version of that lecture on Oprah...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9ya9BXClRw

Randy died of pancreatic cancer in 2008. I don't think it matters what cancer you get, but the terminal state is what you make of it. Randy was very inspirational and courageous. Much like the men that I had the chance to meet with prostate cancer.

Ric Masten was a poet, artist, philospher. Ric wrote this piece many years before he passed in 2007. I wish his website was still up. He had a wonder archive called "Words and One Liner". His art was using a pen and using only one line he could draft a beautiful continuous picture. He continued to write until February of 2007. He died in June that year. He was also very inspirational...

www.yananow.net/troopc.htm#ricmasten

Tony
Disease:
Advanced Prostate Cancer at age 44 (I am 48 now)
pT3b,N0,Mx (original PSA was 19.8) EPE, PM, SVI. Gleason 4+3=7

Treatments:
RALP ~ 2/17/2007 at the City of Hope near Los Angeles.
Adjuvant Radiation Therapy ~ IMRT Completed 8/07
Adjuvant Hormone Therapy ~ 28 months on Casodex and Lupron.

Status:
"I beat up this disease and took its lunch money! I am in remission."
I am currently not being treated, but I do have regular oncology visits.
I am the president of an UsTOO chapter in Las Vegas

Blog : www.caringbridge.org/visit/tonycrispino
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