Samadi aside, Prostate Cancer Foundation "His odds of being cured are 40 percent"

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
29 posts in this thread.
Viewing Page :
 1  2 
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

BobCape
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 416
   Posted 3/30/2011 5:23 PM (GMT -6)   
Davidg, others, To show you that I am not taking issue with your dr specifically, I guess I need to take on the Prostate Cancer Foundation.
 
I DONT like taking on either of them. I dont want to fight. Im tired.
 
Prostate Cancer Foundation, I just dont understand how these blanket statements, how absolute numbers can be given. This otherwise decent story about a very good man, causes me concern.. just as the Samadi press release...
 
The following - which looks like another promotional release, ends with the statement "His odds of being cured are 40 percent".
 
Who can make such a statement in a period of perpetually changed medicine, or when each case is unique, 40 y/o kids, 80 y/o men, G6 and G9, etc, etc.. 
 
"Since his diagnosis in April 2010, Zenka had his prostate and some lower lymph nodes removed. His cancer was upgraded to Stage 4 when single Gleason 5 cancer cells were discovered in his lymph nodes. He subsequently underwent seven weeks of radiation therapy and is currently receiving a three-year course of hormone deprivation therapy. His odds of being cured are 40 percent."
 
 
It seems to me, even by these well meaning doctors, patients and orgs, statements that generalize like that, or 'assume" too many factors, end up doing more harm than good.
 
We get again into that word "cured". So with a State 4, with some G5, radiation and now a 3 year course of HT, and they know he has a 40% chance of being cured.
 
I just dont get it.
 
There's a good reason than ANY commercial ad would NATURALLY POST a disclaimer "each case is  different,. each situation is different" etc, etc, etc,,!!
 
Thats my opinion. Samadi, PCF, I dont care who it is.

Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 7663
   Posted 3/30/2011 5:50 PM (GMT -6)   
Bob,
You probably saved Dr. Samadi 20 grand in advertising fees this week alone by placing his name in the subject line of one of the busiest forums on the net. LOL.

I have heard this said and I have repeated it:

There are lies, dam.n lies, and there are statistics.

If I die and get judged in the wrong direction I would challenge the decision knowing that I am certain that I will have available legal representation that has never lost a case. (you know how most lawyers never lose cases even though they fight them against other lawyers...).

The truth be told, any doctor or organization can publish statistical data with whatever twist they can add to get favorable representation of the data. This is why anything below a Level 1 study is subject to interpretation. I remember thinking that Dr. Bruce Trock must be some kind of doctor when he was publishing numerous papers in PuBMed for Johns Hopkins. The problem I later found out was the Dr. Trock is not an MD kind of doctor. He is a PhD specializing on statistics. So all those "Trock et al" studies you see was not compiled by a patient experienced doctor.

Silly me...

Tony
Advanced Prostate Cancer at age 44 (I am 48 now)
pT3b,N0,Mx (original PSA was 19.8) EPE, PM, SVI. Gleason 4+3=7

Treatments:
Da Vinci Surgery ~ 2/16/2007
Adjuvant Radiation Therapy ~ IMRT Completed 8/07
Adjuvant Hormone Therapy ~ 28 months on Casodex and Lupron.
Undetectable PSA.

Blog: www.caringbridge.org/visit/tonycrispino

davidg
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 4093
   Posted 3/30/2011 5:50 PM (GMT -6)   
i don't know how they get these statistics.

I know we are not statistics.

I also know that i soght out statistics when I tried understanding my gleason 6, and sought more when I was upgraded to 3+4 gleason 7.

A lot of what I found was complete bs.

I know that when my sister-in-law was diagnosed with breast cancer that had spread all over 7 years ago she was handed a hospice card. 7 years later she is still fighting a horrific battle. Just today we learned she now has menningitis. She saw her children grow 7 more years than someone had expected.

One of my bosses was told he would die of pancreatic cancer 8 years ago. He's still alive today.

goodlife
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 2616
   Posted 3/30/2011 6:00 PM (GMT -6)   
We made not be statistics in the purest sense of the word, but we are statistical points. Each of us is a statistic in some doctors book.

We have seen studies that have shown Srt within 2 years has UP TO a 40 % chance of success.

However, a stage 4 that is systemic with G5 cells certainly has a much worse chance than a G6 that hasd a positive margin.

I agree Bob. Seems like the FDA or some other agency would be able to limit what a licensed doctor can say in advertising.

Goodlife

Casey59
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 3172
   Posted 3/30/2011 7:03 PM (GMT -6)   

Keep in mind that statistics describe trends in large numbers of people.  More meaningful statistics will separately describe trends of people with similarly characterized cases (for example, low risk cases have better statistical outcomes than high risk cases).  Statistics cannot be used to predict what will actually happen to an individual.

Any specific individual is either 100% alive or 100% dead at any given time.  What the statistics can meaningfully tell that one individual is how big of a “fight” they are in…a great big fight, a medium fight, or a little fight.  People win and lose all three, and so it simply helps tell you what you fighting mind-set should be.  It may also help guide you about the level of treatment risk you are willing to take.

Here’s how what I just described applies to the often-quoted overall survival (OS) rates.  Take the example of a particularly aggressive cancer with a median OS of 8 months after reaching stage 4.  It doesn’t mean that everyone dies at exactly 8 months…there is a distribution of various results which actually occur.  Doctors use the median, rather than the mean (average) because the distribution of results across large numbers of people is skewed to the right, but in the past 50% of people with this disease died before 8 months, and 50% died after.  Elderly, weak, frail, co-morbid people might have been among the first to die within months, maybe within weeks.  Those who eat healthy and exercise, those who might be physiologically younger than their chronological age, are otherwise healthy, or have some other perhaps unknown variant influencing their outcome might generally describe those who tend to live longer than the median OS.  Some of these live much longer which tends to extend the skew-ness of the distribution curve.  See this sample distribution curve HERE.

When I see someone imply that statistics are meaningless, my quick conclusion is that they really don’t understand the statistics.  Statistics do not tell you exactly what will happen to any particular one individual, but they tell you the "size of the fight."

While perhaps this posting will not be beneficial to everyone, I hope that this adds meaning for some readers...


BobCape
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 416
   Posted 3/30/2011 7:14 PM (GMT -6)   
Thats all great and everything, but to take AN individual, regardless of age, and suggest that a given cancer treatment, regardless of of stage, provides him a 40% chance of a cure, as if that is gospel, proven or even provable is not very helpful to those still seeking answers.

Yes, numbers can be used to legitimize most any points. They are based on averages in this case.

I am familiar with numbers and averages, I dealt dice in Las Vegas for 4+ years.. I am quite well awaye of statistics and averages.

When the pca states he has a 40% chance of a cure, I am not sure WHAT they are atributing that 40% to?

Are they taking into account the stage 4 they mention? Are they including the fact they mention that Gleason 5 was found in his lymph nodes? That he already had radiation? That he will do 3 years of HT?

Understand my question? Are they saying that "taking all those patient specific variables into account, we pressume a 40% chance of a cure"?

If not, that's how they make it sound.

If so, what if there was no G5 found, does it become 47% chance of cure? What if he didn't have radiation, would it go to 42%?

What is a newbie to take away from this stiry abnd the 40% number. It IS NOT THAT SIMPLE.

Fairwind
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2010
Total Posts : 2315
   Posted 3/30/2011 8:19 PM (GMT -6)   
Bob, nobody can predict how you or I will do as individuals.. But they CAN predict how a group of 5000 men will fare using a standardized set of parameters..

www.mskcc.org/applications/nomograms/Prostate/SalvageRadiationTherapy.aspx

Here is a Nomogram for salvage radiation patients and you can add HT if you like..
Age 68.
PSA age 55: 3.5, DRE normal.
age 58: 4.5
61: 5.2
64: 7.5, DRE "Abnormal"
65: 8.5, " normal", biopsy, 12 core, negative...
66 9.0 "normal", 2ed biopsy, negative, BPH, Proscar
67 4.5 DRE "normal"
68 7.0 3rd biopsy positive, 4 out of 12, G-6,7, 9
RALP Sept 3 2010, pos margin, one pos vesicle nodes neg. Post Op PSA 0.9 SRT, HT. 2-15-'11 PSA 0.0

John T
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 3716
   Posted 3/30/2011 9:08 PM (GMT -6)   
Bob,
Statistics can only predict the probability of an event occurring, not an individual outcome.
If you flip a coin the probability of getting a head is 50%. Over a long period the number of heads and tails will be equal. You cannot predict with any degree of certainty what an individual flip will be; it is possible to flip 20 tails in a row, but the probability of the 21 flip will still be 50-50.
What they are saying is an individual with certain stats will have a 40% chance of being cured based on the past results of patients with similar stats.
JohnT
65 years old, rising psa for 10 years from 4 to 40; 12 biopsies and MRIS all negative. Oct 2009 DXed with G6 <5%. Color Doppler biopsy found 2.5 cm G4+3. Combidex clear. Seeds and IMRT, no side affects and psa .1 at 1.5 years.

logoslidat
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 2676
   Posted 3/31/2011 3:10 AM (GMT -6)   
Yes but if these same statistics said 90%chance......
Diagnosed 8/14/09 psa 8.1 66,now 67
2cores 70%, rest 6-7 < 5%
gleason 3+ 3, up to 3+4 @ the dub
RPP U of Wash, Bruce Dalkin,
pathology 4+3, tertiary5, 2 foci
extensive pni, prostate confined,27 nodes removed -, svi - margins -
99%continent@ cath removal. 1% incont@gaspass,sneeze,cough 18 mos, squirt @ running. psa std test reported on paper as 0.0 as of 12/14/10 ed improving

BobCape
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 416
   Posted 3/31/2011 6:40 AM (GMT -6)   
First off folks, I am not a coin.
Secondly, I fully aware that the 40% is a statistical probability number, and desperately aware of the fact that they cannot predict individual outcome. I've read all the monograms, over a year ago.

I dont take this lightly and I dont post statements or concerns lightly. Let me ask you this, getting back to the statement I have concern over;

*had his prostate and some lower lymph nodes removed.
*His cancer was upgraded to Stage 4.
*single Gleason 5 cancer cells were discovered in his lymph nodes.
*underwent seven weeks of radiation therapy.
*currently receiving a three-year course of hormone deprivation therapy.
***His odds of being cured are 40 percent***

1) So are they saying that THIS PATIENT'S factors result in 40% "cure" rate based on ALL of those factors, statistically?

2) Or, if you change ANY of his elements (No G5, or No Lymph node, etc).. that they would adjust that 40% upward or downwards accordingly?

"Statistics can only predict the probability of an event occurring, not an individual outcome."

John, I guess that's my point. THE DO IN FACT STATE THE 40% WITH REGARD TO THIS GUY'S OUTCOME. Without adding that qualifyer.

You know that, I know that, WE know that, But how is NEWBIE to know that?

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 24179
   Posted 3/31/2011 8:23 AM (GMT -6)   
Bob,

I read this whole thread, and will answer in a simple way. Based on your last post above, I feel that your #1 is most correct. With those factors listed, if anything, for that patient, the 40% chance of a cure would be overstated somewhat, not understated, other words, a bit on the optomistic side.

David in SC
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 2/11 1.24
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/10,

Dan Zenka
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2011
Total Posts : 44
   Posted 3/31/2011 1:31 PM (GMT -6)   
Bob, fellow readers of this post, this is Dan Zenka speaking... No need to fight over my numbers.
 
Yes, every case is different (especially with 24 known sub-types of this cancer). That's a point I have stated many times in my blog since I was diagnosed last April 13.  In my case, I asked my oncologist for some guidelines. He is willing to apply the words cancer-free to me in five years. When I pressed for potential percentages, MY POSSIBLE percentages, he gave me the 40 cured/60 I will face recurrence at some point. I rely on my oncologist for guidance and want to have a realisitic grasp on what I am dealing with. As you know, we patients like to live to in context for OUR INDIVIDUAL case. We know these estimates are based on a physician's own clinical experience and interpretation of outcomes data. I know and patients know there are no guarantees.  
 
Believe me, I am focused on staying in the 40 percent as my goal and doing everying I can to avoid the 60 percent area. If my 40 percent seems a bit optimistic, I'll take it! I share my story so others can pick and choose what they find to be useful and develop their context, their approach to their new reality with prostate cancer.
 
Wishing every diagnosed man, every family and every caregiver strength and abundant health.
Dan

On March 29, I also posted:   ...navigating through prostate cancer can be confusing and frustrating–a fact that is exacerbated by the fact there are 24 known subtypes of this cancer. Some types are non-life-threatening while others are very aggressive. With this recent discovery and other breakthroughs including whole genome sequencing and the ability to capture circulating tumor cells, among others, we can now say there will indeed be a day when we can discern between the types of prostate cancer and match the right treatment plan to the right person. This will provide clarity, direction and much needed stress reduction for all. Until that day, patients need to be their own best advocates and make informed decisions with a physician and they trust. Right now, one size does not fit all when it comes to treatment. Progress continues.
 

James C.
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 4452
   Posted 3/31/2011 1:49 PM (GMT -6)   
For those who may not be following along, Dan Zenka the the subject of BobCape's original post, in the link he posted. Here's a little of his bio.

"Dan Zenka is the vice president of communications for the Prostate Cancer Foundation, and after helping fight the disease through his role with PCF, his battle recently became personal: he himself was diagnosed with prostate cancer."

Dan, welcome to HW, by the way. an honor and pleasure for myself personally
James C. Age 63
Gonna Make Myself A Better Man tinyurl.com/28e8qcg
4/07: PSA 7.6, 7/07 Biopsy: 3 of 16 PCa, 5% involved, left lobe, GS6
9/07: Nerve Sparing open RP, Path: pT2c, 110 gms., clear except:
Probable microscopic involvement-left apical margin -GS6
3 Years: PSA's .04 each test until 04/10-.06, 09/10-.09, 12/10-.09, 02/11-.08
ED-total-Bimix 30cc

Post Edited (James C.) : 3/31/2011 12:53:35 PM (GMT-6)


Dan Zenka
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2011
Total Posts : 44
   Posted 3/31/2011 2:04 PM (GMT -6)   
Thank you, James. It seems that we are all in good and sympathetic company!

As I approach my one-year anniversary, I created a personal tribute to prostates:

Pity the Poor Prostate
One year after mine spoke up, it’s time to pay tribute to prostates everywhere.

April is fast upon us. The 13th of the month will mark the one year anniversary of my diagnosis–365 days since my little gland volleyed a shot that was heard around my world and rocked it. During these 12 months–a measure of time that defies characterization in my mind–I have had a good amount of time to consider the life of a prostate. By my assessment, it’s not a glamorous one.

The male prostate plays a vital role in human sexuality, yet, unlike the female breast, no one is inclined to immortalize it in works of art. It stirs no sense of reverence or enticement. Certainly, no one is getting rich publishing photos of it on the web or in publications that tend to be hidden from sight. When folks do engage in discussion of internal body parts, we hear about livers, kidneys, gall bladders and an array of other fleshy parts, but rarely–if ever–about the prostate. In the rare cases it is talked about, many insist on changing its name by adding an “r” and calling it a “prostrate” instead of its proper name, prostate, which rhymes with late. No matter how ”prostrate (incapacitated) with grief” Miss Scarlett may have been in Gone with the Wind, it certainly wasn’t an ill prostate adding to her woes.

To add insult upon injury, consider its place in life…

Every prostate is destined to live in the industrial part of town. With a bladder hanging over its head and the rectal wall to its back–it is constantly being pushed around and bullied by our bodily tides without so much as an excuse me, coming through or a thank you. Oh, how it must shudder at the thought of beer and chili outings with the guys.

Its professional life isn’t much to brag about either. It is forced into the workforce early in life to produce copious amounts of seminal fluid, long before a young man can even comprehend, much less find, a meaningful relationship. Then, with the assistance of miracle drugs such as Cialis and Viagra, it is often forced to work well beyond what was once considered–by some obliging partners–a respectable retirement age.

It’s only when a series of biological events triggers a potential health problem that prostates get any respect. If they are lucky, they are treated with antibiotics for bacterial infection (prostatitis) and given a reprieve. As they age (like many of us) they can lose their youthful shape and grow in mass (benign prostatic hyperplasia). If they are unfortunate enough to be suspected of harboring renegade cells (prostate cancer), they are poked, prodded and bombarded by needles. This often leads to the spectre of being subjected to radiation, toxic chemical substances and powerful drugs. Often, they are separated from the only life they have ever known by a cold, razor-sharp scaple. REALLY… they’re just doing their job, not asking for much in return when their environment turns on them. It’s just not fair. What’s more, once they heal from their surgery, many men who are glad to resume their sex lives without the prostate’s standard contribution (depending on age, physical fitness and treatment) do so without giving much thought to a once loyal but now lost friend.

In short, prostates everywhere are misunderstood, underappreciated, overworked and forced to live in the shadows. If I could, I’d personally train them to belt out a good round of “R-E-S-P-E-C-T, DON’T KNOW WHAT IT MEANS TO ME” at full party volume… I believe it would certainly become the most preferred vocal uttered by male derrieres around the world.

Yes, one year after diagnosis and ten months following my surgery, I miss my prostate. I wish I never had to let the little guy go. But I did. I remain grateful for its years of service and remain steadfast in my assumed role as Defender of Prostates. So, this April, I pay tribute to prostates everywhere and ask that their owners take a moment to familiarize themselves with this amazing little part of their anatomy. Appreciate it and learn how to care for it. Because, all too often, we don’t fully appreciate what we have until it’s gone.

clocknut
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 2311
   Posted 3/31/2011 2:40 PM (GMT -6)   
Hey, Dan, nice essay and tribute. After reading your post, I propose this old Ral Donner song as the anthem for the prostate: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qc6JR7oraeU&feature=related

Post Edited (clocknut) : 3/31/2011 1:46:27 PM (GMT-6)


Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 24179
   Posted 3/31/2011 2:45 PM (GMT -6)   
Dan, welcome, nice essay on your prostate. I don't miss mine, I just wished its cancerous friends had entirely left with it.

David in SC
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 2/11 1.24
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/10,

Dan Zenka
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2011
Total Posts : 44
   Posted 3/31/2011 2:49 PM (GMT -6)   
David,

Totally agreed. But I still feel for the little guy... he was just a victim of biology!

Dan

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 24179
   Posted 3/31/2011 2:54 PM (GMT -6)   
Mine went in the trash along with my apendix (part of the urostomy surgery) and my gall bladder back in 1981, due to pancreatitis. Losing my parts one at at time, lol.

David
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 2/11 1.24
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/10,

Tudpock18
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 2687
   Posted 3/31/2011 3:06 PM (GMT -6)   
Was Ral Donner just Elvis' alter ego or was he a real person?  Let's hear from the conspiracy theorists?
 
Tudpock (Jim)
Age 62 (64 now), G 3 + 4 = 7, T1C, PSA 4.2, 2/16 cancerous, 27cc. Brachytherapy 12/9/08. 73 Iodine-125 seeds. Procedure went great, catheter out before I went home, only minor discomfort. Everything continues to function normally as of 12/8/10. PSA: 6 mo 1.4, 1 yr. 1.0, 2 yr. .8. My docs are "delighted"! My journey:
http://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=35&m=1305643&g=1305643#m1305643

clocknut
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 2311
   Posted 3/31/2011 3:14 PM (GMT -6)   
Hey, Jim
If you go to YouTube and listen to "Ral Donner-the Original Voice of Elvis," you might really begin to wonder.  But then, one day Elvis will come out of hiding and all will be revealed.  Maybe we'll find out he developed prostate cancer and decided to go into permanent seclusion 'cause he wasn't so good with chicks anymore.
 
 

BobCape
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 416
   Posted 3/31/2011 6:20 PM (GMT -6)   
Dan, I hope that if you've read any of my posts, you know that I would happy to be wrong a million times, if it would help a single one of us. My pride is nothing compared to my compassion for other peoples feeling and lives.

I hope you KNOW that my post wasn't at all about you. Really. Actually , it was an offshoot post from another where I took issue with a md entity stating results as if they were somehome standard.

My good friend called me 2 days ago and tells me about his biopsy with a n 18 psa.... "Bob, bad news, it is cancer. Dr says it's a Gleason 7, like you. We must have dome something or gone somewhere together along the way for that to happen. It cant be a coincidence".

HONEST, that was what he tells me.

So when he saw a blanket statement in a press release by a leading uro talking about a "97% cure rate" - I knew it was more complicated than that. Otherwise, I would have said "Dave, there's a doctor that can cure 97% of prostate cancers". There isnt.

Likewise, when I saw your story and they say "40% chance of cure" stated as a fact, I take issue with that. How does one measure that? Your case is so unique. EACH case is so unique.

I guess I feel like a disclaimer should always be used when numbers like that are thrown out there. Because theyre are alot of them, and they're ALL OVER THE PLACE.

But My buddy dave with his G7, he might see Samadi's and think he's got a 87% chance of being cured. Or he might see the PCA story about you and understand that is chances are 40% of being cured.

Or he might see so many different and often conflicting plays of numbers, statements, stats and odds, that he doesn't know what to think.

Know what I mean? Hope so.

Thanks for sharing that awesome post.
So sorry if I offended you personally.
I pray that you live long and remain content.

Bob, Cape Cod.

Dan Zenka
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2011
Total Posts : 44
   Posted 3/31/2011 6:35 PM (GMT -6)   
Bob, No offense taken. Just wanted to let everyone know that I CONSTANTLY try to explain how complicated this disease is. All cases are unique. Believe me... given where I work and the patients and families that I meet, I have a full understanding of where all of this might take me. It's why I was encouraged to read this week's study data about the advantages of neoadjuvant ADT before AND after radiotherapy. But still, it is read with a grain of salt.

Glad you liked the post.

Paryers and wishes for you and all of us.
Dan

Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 7663
   Posted 3/31/2011 10:57 PM (GMT -6)   
Dan,
Thank you for dropping in and thank you for all you, and the Prostate Cancer Foundation do for prostate cancer research, support and education. I know what it is like to have bad "percentages" but I too plan on staying on the good side of them. If you ever make it out to Las Vegas drop in. And if you will be at this years PCRI meeting, I'll see you there.

Tony Crispino
Chapter President
UsTOO Las Vegas
Advanced Prostate Cancer at age 44 (I am 48 now)
pT3b,N0,Mx (original PSA was 19.8) EPE, PM, SVI. Gleason 4+3=7

Treatments:
Da Vinci Surgery ~ 2/16/2007
Adjuvant Radiation Therapy ~ IMRT Completed 8/07
Adjuvant Hormone Therapy ~ 28 months on Casodex and Lupron.
Undetectable PSA.

Blog: www.caringbridge.org/visit/tonycrispino

logoslidat
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 2676
   Posted 4/2/2011 9:58 PM (GMT -6)   
Welcome DanZenka, thats a kinda indian name aint it? Think Little Big Man and follow the links, lol
Diagnosed 8/14/09 psa 8.1 66,now 67
2cores 70%, rest 6-7 < 5%
gleason 3+ 3, up to 3+4 @ the dub
RPP U of Wash, Bruce Dalkin,
pathology 4+3, tertiary5, 2 foci
extensive pni, prostate confined,27 nodes removed -, svi - margins -
99%continent@ cath removal. 1% incont@gaspass,sneeze,cough 18 mos, squirt @ running. psa std test reported on paper as 0.0 as of 12/14/10 ed improving

Dan Zenka
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2011
Total Posts : 44
   Posted 4/3/2011 2:44 PM (GMT -6)   
logoslidat said...
Welcome DanZenka, thats a kinda indian name aint it? Think Little Big Man and follow the links, lol
Actually it's Lithuanian. Must admit I must be a bit slow today because I am not following the links!
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
29 posts in this thread.
Viewing Page :
 1  2 
Forum Information
Currently it is Tuesday, September 30, 2014 6:46 AM (GMT -6)
There are a total of 2,230,139 posts in 248,274 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 157093 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, asifsolanki877.
317 Guest(s), 17 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
sayyadina, MarieLS, MissGigi, babaji, Zoarie, THE HAPPY TURTLE, asifsolanki877, Probiotic, Hep 97, Rachel1200, Happychick, beachbumcindylou, soystud, nvrthesame98, electracat, Gwn, LanieG


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest  Follow HealingWell.com on YouTube
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2014 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer