PROTON THERAPY VERSUS SURGERY

WOULD YOU CHOOSE PROTONS OR SURGERY???
17
PROTONS - 53.1%
10
SURGERY - 31.3%
5
OTHER - 15.6%

 
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teb829
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 2/5/2007 10:36 PM (GMT -6)   
I'M 55-JUST DIAGNOSED 2 WEEKS AGO-PSA WAS 1.5 NO PALPABLE TUMOR-GLEASON SCORE OF 3+3=6-CT AND BONE SCANS WERE NEGATIVE-1 OF 12 BIOPSY SAMPLES WITH A 10% OR LESS INFILTRATION-HAD BIOPSY BECAUSE OF BLOOD IN MY SEMEN-I AM THINKING about SURGERY OR PROTON THERAPY AT LOMA LINDA-I'M CONCERNED about THE LONG TERM PROGNOSIS WITH PROTON THERAPY AND THE SIDE EFFECTS AND RISKS OF SURGERY -SOMEONE PLEASE ENLIGHTEN ME ON BOTH-I'M FRUSTRATED AND CONFUSED AND SCARED TO DEATH-THANK YOU-TOM

M. Kat
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 715
   Posted 2/6/2007 9:39 AM (GMT -6)   
Tom, welcome to this site where no one wants to be. Take your time and research everything. I saw from another thread where you mentioned the proton therapy. if it's convenient to do, then do it. unfortunately, Jeff could not take the time away from his business to have treatments since it would have meant him being gone for so long. he's happy that he had the surgery because he knows the cancer is gone, but is dealing with erectile dysfunction. we are pretty sure that will get back to 100% eventually, but it is frustrating. and by the way...you're scared to life...not death. :) kat
Husband Jeff 56 years old diagnosed July 27, 2006
PSA 6.5, 2 positive areas in biopsy, Gleason 3+3=6
Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy August 30, 2006
pathology report - all clear - cancer gone
1st post-surgery PSA test 0.1, 2nd post-surgery PSA test 0.1
no more pads Oct 12, 2006
first "real" erection with use of pump 12/16/06


Tamu
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 626
   Posted 2/6/2007 10:19 AM (GMT -6)   
Tom,

Okay, those of us that have been diagnosed with PC know exactly the feelings that are bombarding you. Let me help you some with information. A probabliity table has been developed by Dr. Partin at John Hopkin's and updated. This table predicts the extent of the cancer based upon the PSA and Gleason score. Your low PSA definitely helps the progression and your Gleason indicates the cancer is not aggressive. I took your numbers and compared them to the table. The reults indicate that there is a 90% chance that your cancer is confined to the prostate organ and another 9% that it is confined to the prostate capsule. The table indicates that the chances of it spreading to the seminal vessels or the lymph nodes is 0%. All of this means that first, your PC is curable, and second, that you have plenty of time to do your research and choose a treatment.

Unfortunately this forum by far is populated by experiences with surgical treatment. If you have not found it I would suggest you go to www.yananow.net and when you enter the site click on mentor experiences and scroll down. You will find the stories of men that were diagnosed with PC listed by the type of treatment they chose. There are several under the proton radiation treatment.

From a surgical point of view you will find experiences here for both the robotic (Da Vinci) and the open. Also, in general you will find that the choice of surgery was made for two primary reasons. The first is that taking the prostate out and having the pathology done on it is the only way to know that the cancer was confined and it is gone or it was not confined and further treatment is required. The second is that with any type of radiation treatment the resultant tissue damage done in the prostate area in almost al cases precludes any following surgical treatment. This means that after radiation treatment the only measure of whether or not the cancer has been killed is the PSA and if the PSA indicates reoccurance then you are into hormone therapy and chemo.

Your age makes a difference to the type of treatment you may choose. Again, in general, the reoccurance rate for a radiation treatment and a surgical one are about the same out to 10 years. Beyond 10 years it begins to favor the surgical treatment. In my case if I had been say upper 60's or early 70's I probably would have chosen the proton treatment. Since I was 56 when diagnosed and with my family history expect to live into my 80's I chose surgery.

As to surgery you have the open and Da Vinci procedures. In either one the key is to find a surgeon that has done a lot of them and is up to date on all of the new techniques. A local urological surgeon that does 15 or 20 a year is not what you want. The side effects/complications are highly dependent upon the skill of the surgeon. The incontinence and impotence are scary and deflating. To see my journey go to Tamu Update on this forum and you can read my story. There are many others and I am sure that they will chime in shortly.

Good luck on your journey and ask any question that you want on ths forum. There are only people that want help and want to help here and we have been very open about any subject.

Tamu
Diagnosed 7/6/06
1 of 10 core samples, 40%
Stage T1c, Gleason 3+3
Da Vinci on 11/01/06
Catheter out on 11/13/06
56 Years Old
Post Op Path
Gleason 3+3
Approx. 5% of prostate involved
Prostate Confined, margins clear
Undetectable PSA on 12/18/06
No more pads as of 1/13/07


bluebird
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 2542
   Posted 2/6/2007 1:22 PM (GMT -6)   

Tom *teb829  &  Family,

  

       A   “Special”  Warm Welcome  to  You!

 

I know we can “all” make Your Journey smoother just by being here for you! 

This is truly a great forum!!! ~ You have joined! You are now part our forum family ~ a group of wonderful individuals who are so willing to share their journey with you! 

 

It helps “all of us” ~ to help you ~ if we know where you are on your path.

So ~ Please stay with us and take our hand when you need it!  Keep posting.... OKAY!!

 

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER... and POWER conquers fear

YOU MAKE THE DECISIONS… YOU HAVE OPTIONS…

~ and ~

Your decision will be the right decision for you!!!

 

We invite you to visit our personal thread listed in our Signature below… It will let you know why we chose surgery….

 

Our thoughts and prayers will be with you as you continue your search for answers…

In Friendship ~ Lee & Buddy

 

“God Bless You”

 

It's a little prayer  ~  "God Bless You"

...but it means so much each day,

It means may angels guard you

and guide you on your way.

 

 

(Direct Link ~ just click on the title below and a new window will open!  

Reminder … click on the REFRESH icon once you get there)

Helpful Hints for New Members... Hope this helps you! :) Updated 02-05-2007


mama bluebird - Lee & Buddy… from North Carolina

Link to our personal journey…>>>     Our Journey ~ Sharing is Caring 

April 3, 2006  53 on surgery day

RRP / Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy with "wide excision"

PSA 4.6   Gleason  3+3=6    T2a   Confined to Prostate

June 29th ~ PSA Less than 0.1 Non-detectable


bluebird
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 2542
   Posted 2/6/2007 1:31 PM (GMT -6)   

Hi ~ Tom *teb829,

 

Yes ~ this truly is a very confusing and scary time.  We are so thankful you found this forum because we will “all” help you through this.  This journey is best traveled with friends…  So ~ stay with us okay!!

 

“Our Journey” has a link in our signature below.  I really hope you have time to check it out. 

 

This will be a time where you’ll probably hit OVERLOAD. 

Stop…. and take a nice deep breath and re-group.  Each stepping-stone is leading to becoming cancer free… so take each one as it comes into your path and know that we are there with helping hands to help hold you steady.

 

KNOWLEDGE is POWER………..  POWER conquers the fear!!!!

 

In New Friendship ~ Lee & Buddy


mama bluebird - Lee & Buddy… from North Carolina

Link to our personal journey…>>>     Our Journey ~ Sharing is Caring 

April 3, 2006  53 on surgery day

RRP / Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy with "wide excision"

PSA 4.6   Gleason  3+3=6    T2a   Confined to Prostate

June 29th ~ PSA Less than 0.1 Non-detectable


Dutch
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 400
   Posted 2/7/2007 12:24 AM (GMT -6)   

Tom:

With your age and diagnosis, it would seem that you would be a perfect candidate for proton.

Have you visited protonbob.com, read the testimonials and talked to some of the men who have had proton?  Loma Linda has been doing proton since 1990 and the results are comparable to those of surgery.  My treatment was 5yr ago and I have had no side effects.  Think it would be worth your looking into.

Good luck in your search.

Dutch

 


M. Kat
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 715
   Posted 2/7/2007 8:49 AM (GMT -6)   
Dutch, thank you for your response. I saw your post at another thread, too. it's great to have someone here who has gone a different route than surgery. would you consider starting a new thread with your journey? kat
Husband Jeff 56 years old diagnosed July 27, 2006
PSA 6.5, 2 positive areas in biopsy, Gleason 3+3=6
Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy August 30, 2006
pathology report - all clear - cancer gone
1st post-surgery PSA test 0.1, 2nd post-surgery PSA test 0.1
no more pads Oct 12, 2006
first "real" erection with use of pump 12/16/06


jetguy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 697
   Posted 2/7/2007 12:03 PM (GMT -6)   
Hello Tom, I also suggest that you go to protonbob.com.  In addition to Loma Linda, there are new proton beam facilities in Houston and Boston.  A neighbor of mine had proton beam four years ago at Loma Linda and is very happy with the result.  You might consider Image Guided Radiation Therapy.  For information, Google IGRT and IMRT.  The side effects of proton beam and IGRT seem to be similar.  The difficulty with the decision process is that surgery, or radiation, or whatever is that none of them are perfect.
 
Regars,
 
Bill
Gleason 3+3=6, T1c, one core in twelve, another pre-cancerous.
62 years old and good health.  Married 37 years.  To same woman!


gralestel
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 2/8/2007 7:44 PM (GMT -6)   
my husband is trying to make the same decision right now. we have surgery scheduled at sloan-kettering with dr peter scardino, but we have heard positive things about proton radiation so we are looking into that right now too.
people seem to be so positive about protons - i just wonder what gives??? if it has no side effects and is as effective as surgery (from what i read at protonbob.com), then why isn't this the standard procedure?

teb829
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 2/8/2007 7:57 PM (GMT -6)   
There are only 3 places doing proton therapy in the country (2 more are being built ) Most doctors will only recommend what they are familiar with or what is local-E-mail some of the people from the www.protonbob.com web site (testimonials) and ask questions-Some of the people will call you personnally and answer questions-After doing a lot of research,talking to people who have gone through surgery,brachytherapy and proton treatment,I've just today, made my appointment to go to Loma Linda on March 13th-Another good we site is www.proton-therapy.org Good luck-Tom

jetguy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 697
   Posted 2/8/2007 8:04 PM (GMT -6)   

Proton therapy does often have side effects.  Similar to IGRT.  Ain't no free lunch with prostate cancer.  It's just that the new radiation therapies are much better than they were a few short years ago.  If the stats you read go back more than a few years, they are out of date.  You can find out tons of info about IMRT, but not a lot about IGRT, which is much better. 

Ya'll hang in there,

Bill


Gleason 3+3=6, T1c, one core in twelve, another pre-cancerous.
62 years old and good health.  Married 37 years.  To same woman!


Dutch
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 400
   Posted 2/8/2007 9:38 PM (GMT -6)   

Jetguy:

Would be interested in the side effects of proton that you have heard of.  IGRT is radiation and the radiation (photon) I would assume would go clear through the body where the proton energy enters the body at 2/3 speed of light, doing very little damage to cells on way to tumor(these cells heal in 6 hr) and the bulk of proton energy is deposited into the tumor at what is called the Bragg Peak.

I agree there is no free lunch.

Dutch

 


gralestel
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 2/9/2007 3:41 PM (GMT -6)   
i would also be very much interested in any info that you hear regarding proton radiation I have found one post from a fellow that seemed to have server incontinence problems, but the forum where i found it was closed so i could not get addtional information Thanks for any help

diagnosed late november
gleason (3+4)
psa 26
5/10 cores positive
perneural invasion in 2 cores

Dutch
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 400
   Posted 2/9/2007 4:07 PM (GMT -6)   
gralestel:
 
My treatment with protons was 5yr ago at Loma Linda.  During the past 5yr I have talked to many men who have gone to Loma Linda, referred 13, sponsor 23 who do not have computers, receive a monthly newsletter from our Loma Linda Prostate Support group and get minutes of the weekly support meeting held at Loma Linda which has alot of alumni reports and I have never seen or heard one mention of incontinence.
 
Now I am not saying it could not happen, but the numbers would have be to so low as to be negligible.
 
Dutch
 
 

pcdave
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 444
   Posted 2/10/2007 3:59 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Tom and everyone

I am happy to see that a Proton Therapy thread has been started! I am starting 8 weeks of Proton Therapy on 2/22/07 because I think it is the right decision for me. My purpose is not to promote any type of treatment, but to educate all prostate cancer patients in the various treatment options, so that they can make their own decision. The majority of men still select surgery as their form of treatment which is very obvious at this message board. Many prostate cancer patients don't know about Proton Therapy or don't know enough about it to fully assess whether or not it may be appropriate for them. I think this is a mistake. Age and PC stats should play a major role in any treatment decision. In the end analysis you have to go with your heart after an exhaustive research of all of the treatment options, their potential for cure based on your PC stats and the potential risk of negative side effects which you are willing to live with if they occur. The rest is in God's hands! I do not believe that there is any perfect treatment for prostate cancer at this time!

After extensive research and networking, i decided on Proton Therapy. My two choices were robotic surgery with one of the top surgeons and Proton Therapy with one of the top radiation oncologists. After much thought and considering my age (notwithstanding that I am still healthy and youthful in many respects), I decided against surgery because I didn't want to take the risk of almost certain impotence (possibly permanent at my age) and possibly total or some degree of incontinence. If I were substantially younger, I might well have elected robotic surgery. I did not want to have to deal with what i thought could well be 100% immediate impotence and the potential difficultly of regaining some degree of potency. I was even more concerned about the possibility of some degree of incontinence. In my final years, i want a reasonable hope for a cure, but also a good quality of life. Having to wear pads and diapers potentially for the rest of my life was not for me. i have read some of the heart breaking stories in these message boards of men struggling with the nasty side effects of surgery. Some side effects improve or go away, but sometimes they don't. Let's face it, choosing a treatment for prostate cancer is a gambling game--you have to weigh the odds. I also felt that Proton Therapy would be non-invasive compared to surgery, and is considered one of the safest forms of radiation, offering hope for minimal side effects. There is no question that radiation (including proton) can eventually lead to some degree of impotence down the road. However, in those cases, drugs such as viagra have been known to overcome the impotency in many cases which is not always true with surgery. Incontinence usually does not happen after proton therapy.

I met with a top medical oncologist and the conclusion was that the chances of a potential cure for me were about the same with surgery, radiation and brachytherapy (seed implants), but the potential negative side effects vary greatly among the various treatments. Quality of life is very important to me--I would rather live fewer years and live them well without having to deal with treatment side effects that make life miserable. I concluded that Proton Therapy offers as good a chance of success as surgery (the supposed gold standard) for me, with the potential for little or no negative side effects short and longer term. It is true with radiation therapy that longer term side effects may occur, especially some form of impotence. However, I believe with radiation therapy, that viagra and other similar pills can overcome impotence in many cases which is not always true with surgery. The problem with brachytherapy is the potential for some nasty urinary problems (e.g., strictures of the urethra making is impossible or difficult to urinate without some medical procedures). IMRT photon (x-ray) therapy is the most sophisticated type of x-ray radiation today, but not as safe as proton radiation. Proton radiation enters the body at a low dose and the high dose is directed to the cancerous area and stops there; x-ray radiation enters and leaves the body at the full dose. It has more potential for damaging good tissue surrounding the prostate. I believe that IMRT x-ray radiation has the potential for greater negative side effects than proton radiation. It is true with radiation therapy (either proton or photon), that it will take up to two or more years for the PSA to get to its lowest level compared to surgery where the PSA usually goes to zero immediately. It is true with surgery that it makes future radiation treatments possible if the cancer recurs. It is not necessarily true that the prostate cannot be removed if the cancer recurs after radiation therapy if the cancer has not escaped the prostate capsule. Some surgeons just refuse to do the surgery, but surgeons at such top hospital as Sloan-Kettering in Manhattan have removed the prostate after radiation therapy if the cancer recurs, depending on the circumstances.

The more usual side effects from proton therapy are as follows:

Short-term (the feeling of a need to urinate more often than usual; could experience some burning upon urination; stools may be more watery; possible tiredness). Most of the short-term side effects, if experienced at all, tend to disappear after treatment. Many proton therapy patient claim no short-term side effects.

Long-term (many of these symptoms may not appear until after a year or much longer; a certain percentage of patients will become impotent (usually substantially less than with surgery), but it is often overcome with viagra and other similar drugs; minor rectal bleeding which may ultimately disappear). Severe urinary and rectal problems are usually considered rare with proton therapy.

I suggest that you visit these websites:

http://www.mskcc.org/mskcc/html/10088.cfm

http://jco.highwire.org/cgi/content/full/21/21/3979

The first website relates to Prostate Nomograms developed by Sloan-Kettering in New York City. You can input various information relating to your stage of cancer (i.e., PSA, Gleason Score, Tumor Stage based on DRE, etc.). The end result will give you 5-year progression free probability statistics comparing radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation therapy and branchytherapy.The second website is an interesting study, again comparing the success rates of the various prostate cancer treatments and related side effects. Keep in mind that EBRT (external beam radiation therapy) is an older form of radiation therapy and IMRT is the most sophisticated form of photon (x-ray) radiation today with the potential for fewer negative side effects. This should be taken into consideration when evaluating this data.

I suggest that you visit these websites for more information on Proton Therapy if you have not already done so.

http://www.protonbob.com/proton-treatment-homepage.asp

http://www.proton-therapy.org/

http://www.oncolink.com/treatment/article.cfm?c=9&s=70&id=211

With respect to Proton Therapy, I suggest that you also consider reading a new book entitled "You Can Beat Prostate Cancer (and you don't need surgery to do it) by Robert J. Marckini. He was treated for prostate cancer at Loma Linda in the year 2000 and started the Proton Bob website above which will give you reference to his book. While his book is very oriented to the proton treatment he received at Loma Linda, I believe it gives a very fair and unbiased discussion of each kind of prostate cancer treatment, including the advantages and disadvantages (i.e., potential for negative side effects). If this book had been available to me when I started my exhaustive research to determine the best treatment option for me, it would have saved me an enormous amount of time and stress. Most prostate cancer patients don't know where to turn to when they first hear their diagnosis of prostate cancer. There are many other excellent books on the market as well as a vast amount of information on the internet. Books offer a good summary and a good starting place because you can otherwise get quickly overwhelmed on the internet. Message boards such as Healing Well and others are a great asset and comfort to prostate cancer patients while they attempt to gain knowledge about prostate cancer, share their knowledge with other patients and ultimately make their treatment decision.

There are now several Proton Therapy centers in the United States for treating prostate cancer and other cancers. Loma Linda University in California has been performing proton radiation treatments since 1990 and has successfully treated thousands of men with prostate cancer. Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in Boston opened a new proton center in 2001 (replacing a smaller one in affiliation with Harvard) which was established in the 1950's. Two new proton centers were opened in 2006, one at the MD Anderson Cancer center in Houston, Texas and one at the University of Florida in Jacksonville. The University of Pa. is expected to open a new proton center in the next two years. The only reason that proton radiation centers have been slow to develop in the United States is the tremendous cost ($100 million or more). Even though Proton Therapy is presently the most expensive type of prostate cancer treatment because of the cost of developing a proton beam facility, it is significant that Medicare has approved and will pay for the cost of this treatment.

God bless all and best of luck in your treatment for prostate cancer!

Dave
68, Biopsy 9/27/06, Stage T1c, PSA 7.1, Gleason 6 [less than 5% in two areas], Gleason 7 (3+4) [less than 20% in third area], negative DRE, bone scan and MRI. Starting proton radiation therapy 2/22/07.

Post Edited (pcdave) : 2/10/2007 6:12:24 PM (GMT-7)


Dutch
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 400
   Posted 2/10/2007 5:33 PM (GMT -6)   

Just a clarification to Dave's post above.

X-ray (photon) does both enter and exit the body but proton DOES NOT exit the body.  The beam is stopped at the tumor site.  The proton beam enters the body at 2/3 the speed of light, doing very little damage to cells along the way (these cells repair themselves in 6 hr) and the bulk of the energy is deposited into the tumor at what is called the Bragg Peak.  The proton beam goes no further.

I have also been told that if the cancer should return, surgery can be done in some cases as the damage to surrounding tissue is minimal.  Cure rates for proton are comparable to those of surgery.

In the future, as more facilities become available, I think proton will be more widely used.

Dave, I wish you the best and know you will have a good experience at Loma Linda.

Dutch


Diagnosed Feb 2001  (Age 65)
PSA 4.8
Gleason 3 + 3 = 6
T2
Completed Proton therapy @ Loma Linda - Aug 2001
5yr PSA   0.17
Have had no side effects.


pcdave
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 444
   Posted 2/10/2007 7:04 PM (GMT -6)   
Dutch

Thanks for the clarification on how the proton beam works. Actually, I am having my proton therapy at MGH because it is closest to my home. I think I will get just as good radiation treatment there as Loma Linda, but the special bonding experience among patients, staff and doctors at Loma Linda will be sorely missing. As you well know, as proton therapy comes into the forefront for treatment of prostate cancer with so many new proton centers emerging, many patients will go to a center closest to their home. I only hope that other proton centers will ultimately offer the Loma Linda experience or something close thereto. many thanks for your good wishes. best of luck to you in keeping your PSA low!

Dave
68, Biopsy 9/27/06, Stage T1c, PSA 7.1, Gleason 6 [less than 5% in two areas], Gleason 7 (3+4) [less than 20% in third area], negative DRE, bone scan and MRI. Starting proton radiation therapy 2/22/07.

Post Edited (pcdave) : 2/10/2007 6:13:36 PM (GMT-7)


Pete42
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 114
   Posted 3/21/2007 11:28 AM (GMT -6)   
Teb- Havebn't heard from you in a while, have you made your decision yet? If you would you mind sharing your thought process? Thanks in advance - Pete

Izzyblizzy
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 402
   Posted 3/25/2007 6:58 PM (GMT -6)   
this is just a test to see if i can vote after posting a post
Significant other diagnosed: 10/30/06
PSA: 3.7 (up from 3.4 prior year)
Gleason: 3+3
Biopsy: 1/10 positive, 5% cancerous, right apex.
Da Vinci Scheduled: 4/10/07


teb829
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 3/28/2007 10:30 PM (GMT -6)   
Pete-I've chosen Loma linda but have a dilemma-I had my slides reviewed by Cleveland Clinic-they say they can't diagnose cancer only atypical cells not diagnostic of but suspicious of cancer.I took the slides to Loma Linda and they came back with the original diagnosis of cancer-So,I sent the slides to Dr. Epstein at Johns Hopkins and he came back with the same "no cancer" only atypical cells diagnosis as the Cleveland Clinic-I'm so fed up with this whole ordeal I don't know which way to turn. Cleveland Clinic and John's Hopkin's both recommend another biopsy,which I'm told doesn't mean I don't have cancer because 20% to 25% of cancers are missed during a biopsy.Dr. Bush at Loma Linda stands by his reccomendation of starting treatment April 10th- I've also scheduled another biopsy at the Cleveland Clinic on April 2nd-I'm ready to jump off a bridge!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Dutch
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 400
   Posted 3/29/2007 12:25 AM (GMT -6)   

Teb:

Another area of research might be the color doppler - think it is supposed to be a fairly new machine and supposed to show up any tumor in the prostate.  You can google prostate cancer color doppler.

Hope this helps.

Dutch


Diagnosed Feb 2001  (Age 65)  Currently 71
PSA 4.8
Gleason 3 + 3 = 6
T2b
Completed Proton therapy @ Loma Linda - Aug 2001
5yr PSA   0.17
Have had no side effects.


Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 7665
   Posted 3/29/2007 1:43 AM (GMT -6)   
I've heard of that Dutch.
In fact, my radiaologist told me that there is a "tracer" that can be injected and can gather at the site of the tumor. It is able to see if the radiation area should be expanded. I don't understand this technology much, but perhaps Tom should ask about it at the biopsy.

Tom I don't know why I did not add this on your other post because I discussed it today in a "matter of fact" discussion with my Radiologist. But please stay on the bridge...You still might not have this disease.

Tony

Cedar Chopper
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 432
   Posted 3/29/2007 4:14 AM (GMT -6)   
Teb,

I think you are thinking as clearly as possible in your situation.
I agree the second biopsy is warranted.
The level of care/opinions you have sought out is phenomenal.
The information gathered from a second biopsy will give more data
(size, spread, speed of growth, absence!, etc.)
The fact that your current data is inconclusive can be good news.
Still, an aggressive watch is best for you.

Remember Whose you are.

Cedar Chopper
~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*
2 Years of PSA between 4 and 5.5
Biopsy 23DEC06 
Only 5 percent cancer in one of 8 samples.
Gleeson 3+3=6
Radical Prostatectomy 16FEB07 at age 54.
1+" tumor - touching inside edge of gland.
Confined:)
***************
Texas Hill Country
FRESH Produce Department Manager
Have you had your 5 colors today?


Dutch
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 400
   Posted 3/29/2007 1:03 PM (GMT -6)   

Tony:

This color doppler works just like the doppler weather machines on TV that show the rain in green for instance.  Cancer cells need blood so, from what I understand, the tumor area will show up as red on the scan.  There is one in Ventura, CA and think the cost is about $200-300 for the scan.

Dutch


Diagnosed Feb 2001  (Age 65)  Currently 71
PSA 4.8
Gleason 3 + 3 = 6
T2b
Completed Proton therapy @ Loma Linda - Aug 2001
5yr PSA   0.17
Have had no side effects.


bronco
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2007
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 10/8/2007 7:47 AM (GMT -6)   
Hey Tom,
In your same boat do not know what do.
 
Lewis B......... Age 50
PSA 1.2
Stage T2a A1 right
Gleason 3+3=6
 
leaning towards Proton Radiation Loma Linda Hospital.
 

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Post Edited By Moderator (bluebird) : 10/14/2007 1:13:58 PM (GMT-6)

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